Information current

October 16, 2020

We're in Phase 3 of lifting COVID-19 restrictions. Watch the latest video update.

For non-medical questions, email covid19info@gov.yk.ca or phone 1-877-374-0425.

For medical questions or if you feel ill, phone 811, or launch the COVID-19 self-assessment tool.

Border restrictions during COVID-19

Yukon has no travel restrictions, but there are self-isolation requirements

Anyone may enter Yukon, but some people will have to self-isolate when they arrive in the territory. Learn more by reading the "Find out if you have to self-isolate" section, below. 

Federal travel restriction measures

The federal government has travel restrictions measures in place that could affect your travel. Find out about Canadian travel restrictions.

Download the Information for People Entering Yukon brochure.

Enforcement numbers updated: October 14, 2020 – 15:20
Total travellers 54,305
CEMA complaints 913
Charges laid under CEMA 18
   

We started tracking these figures on April 29, 2020.

CEMA is the Civil Emergency Measures Act

Find out if you have to self-isolate in Yukon

If an outbreak occurs, we can change or revoke these self-isolation exemption measures.

Who does not need to self-isolate when they arrive in Yukon?

  • Critical workers
  • Residents of Yukon, British Columbia, Northwest Territories and Nunavut as long as they:
    • can prove they’re a resident of 1 of those 4 jurisdictions by showing valid identification; and
    • complete a declaration to confirm they have not travelled outside of Yukon, British Columbia, Northwest Territories or Nunavut in the 14 days before they enter Yukon.

Minor children travelling with their parents do not need to show proof of residency. 

Who has to self-isolate in Whitehorse?

  • All residents of Canada who do not live in Yukon, British Columbia, Northwest Territories or Nunavut; this applies even if the person has been in 1 of those 4 regions for 14 days, or longer.
  • Residents of Yukon living in Whitehorse who’ve travelled outside of Yukon, British Columbia, Northwest Territories or Nunavut.
  • Residents of British Columbia, Northwest Territories or Nunavut who've travelled outside out these 3 regions and Yukon in the 14 days before arriving in Yukon.
  • Residents of Yukon, British Columbia, Northwest Territories or Nunavut, who fly into Yukon on a flight that has a stopover outside of these 4 regions.

If you're a Yukoner living in a Yukon community

Yukoners living in communities outside Whitehorse who’ve travelled outside Yukon, British Columbia, Northwest Territories or Nunavut can self-isolate in their home communities.

If you have to self-isolate, you may be eligible for an alternative self-isolation plan.

Where can you self-isolate in Whitehorse?

You’re responsible for covering the cost of your self-isolation accommodation. You cannot self-isolate at a Government of Yukon campground, but you can self-isolate in a hotel or similar accommodation. Email us and we can help you to figure out your self-isolation plan: covid19info@gov.yk.ca.

What information is required for travelling to Yukon?

When you stop at the check station, you will need to provide:

  • valid ID;
  • your name;
  • your cell phone or home phone number;
  • your home address or address where you will be self-isolating; and
  • confirmation that you do not have any symptoms consistent with COVID-19.

Every person has to provide this information when crossing into Yukon.

Proof of residency

If you are a resident of BC, NWT, or Nunavut, you must provide proof of residency. The list below provides some common examples, but other documents that prove your place of residence may be accepted by border enforcement officers.

A government-issued picture ID that also shows your address, such as a:

  • Driver’s license; or
  • BC Services Card. 

Other government-issued ID, together with a:

  • Utility bill from the past month (cell phone bills are not accepted);
  • Signed residential tenancy agreement;
  • Mortgage documentation or property tax bills; or
  • Social assistance benefit confirmation.

All ID must be valid; expired ID is not accepted.

People who'll have to self-isolate

Once through the check station, you must:

  • follow the instructions listed on signage, or given to you by a border officer when you enter Yukon;
  • proceed directly to your home or another suitable safe place;
  • do not stop for groceries or do errands on your way;
  • arrange for someone else to drop off food or provisions for you;
  • avoid unnecessary stops and limit essential stops, such as for gas, as much as possible;
  • if you do stop, practise proper physical distancing by staying 2 metres (6 feet) away from others you may encounter.

Find out how to self-isolate.

Exception to self-isolation 

All people who are not residents of Yukon, British Columbia, Northwest Territories or Nunavut have to self-isolate for 14 days upon arrival in Whitehorse, unless:

  • they're visiting a family member in which case they can self-isolate at their residence in Yukon; or
  • they have a home on a mine or work site that they can self-isolate in with family members only. Learn more about self-isolating at work camps. 
Who can you contact about self-isolation?

Phone us toll free between 7:30 a.m. and 8 p.m., 7 days a week, 1-877-374-0425.

Email us between 7:30 a.m. and 8 p.m., Monday through Friday, covid19info@gov.yk.ca.

If you:

  • do not have a place where you can safely self-isolate; 
  • you require support, such as picking up medication or groceries; or
  • are in need of mental wellness or substance use care while self-isolation:
Who can you contact with questions about enforcement?

Report an infraction

Report a possible infraction of Civil Emergency Measures Act.
Complete the online form
Phone toll free: 1-877-374-0425

Questions

If you have questions about borders and enforcement, email:covid19enforcement@gov.yk.ca.

Anyone with information on suspicious cross-border activities is encouraged to call the CBSA Border Watch Line 1-888-502-9060.

Travelling through Yukon to Alaska, Northwest Territories or elsewhere

The border between the United States and Canada is closed to all non-essential travel. Americans can travel into Canada if they’re travelling:

  • to Alaska; or
  • from Alaska to the rest of the United States.

Americans travelling through Yukon have to follow a designated travel corridor. We give travellers a map of this route at Yukon borders. 

If you're travelling through Yukon

You're able to transit through Yukon so long as you do so in 24 hours. If you're in transit through Yukon, you'll need to provide confirmation that you do not have any symptoms consistent with COVID-19.

You must also:

  • follow the instructions listed on signage, or given to you by a border officer when you enter Yukon;
  • not stay at territorial campgrounds.
  • avoid stopping in rural communities;
  • avoid stopping for non-essential reasons;
  • practise physical distancing when buying essentials by staying 2 metres (6 feet) away from other people;
  • self-isolate by staying in your room if you must stay in a hotel;
  • pay at the pump if you must stop for gas; and
  • phone 811 if you develop any COVID-19-like symptoms (cough, fever, or difficulty breathing) after making a declaration at the check station.

If you're travelling to Alaska 

The state of Alaska introduced travel guidance. Read Alaska’s health guidance for travellers during the COVID-19 pandemic.

If you're travelling to Northwest Territories

Before you travel, read Northwest Territories travel guidelines.

What are the restrictions for crossing the Yukon-Alaska borders?

The Canada Border Services Agency and U.S. Customs are temporarily restricting all non-essential travel across its borders to limit the spread of COVID-19. This is a precautionary measure. Find out about what is considered essential travel

Anyone with information on suspicious cross-border activities is encouraged to call the CBSA Border Watch Line 1-888-502-9060.

What is a self-isolation plan?

You have to have a self-isolation plan if you are not a resident of:

  • Yukon;
  • British Columbia;
  • Northwest Territories; or
  • Nunavut.

You'll be asked to fill this information out on a declaration form when entering Yukon. A self-isolation plan includes:

  • details of the place where you plan to stay in Yukon for the 14-day period of self-isolation;
  • details of any place where you plan to be after the period of self-isolation; and
  • personal contact information.

Find out more about self-isolation.

Where can you find the Civil Emergency Measures Act (CEMA) orders?

All Civil Emergency Measures Act orders can be found on Legislation changes for COVID-19.

What is the difference between an order and a direction?

Orders were put in place under the Civil Emergency Measures Act. Orders are the law and you're required to follow them. If you do not comply you may be fined or face the possibility of imprisonment.

Directions are strong suggestions from the Chief Medical Health Officer that people are asked to follow to ensure public health and safety. Directions are not enforceable. 

Find out the orders and directions in Yukon.

What does a CEMA enforcement officer do?

A Civil Emergency Measures Act (CEMA) enforcement officer enforces all orders under CEMA. They:

  • are stationed at Yukon points of entry that are not staffed by the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA);
  • collect contact information of all travellers coming through Yukon or returning home such as details of their 14-day self-isolation plans and declarations of any symptoms of COVID-19; and
  • have the ability to investigate and lay charges to any person in violation of an order under CEMA.
How to report a person breaking a Civil Emergency Measures Act order?

Report a possible infraction of a Civil Emergency Measures Act Order online or phone the toll-free InfoLine at 1-877-374-0425.

Please include all details of your complaint and an investigator will be assigned your file. This investigator will contact you if more information is required.

Anyone with information on suspicious cross-border activities is encouraged to call the CBSA Border Watch Line 1-888-502-9060.

What happens if someone breaks a CEMA order?

If a complaint is received and an offence has occurred, then a Government of Yukon enforcement officer will follow up. Our approach to enforcement is to educate the public and ask for voluntary compliance before laying any charges.

When should you contact the RCMP?

If there is an emergency or dangerous situation that requires an immediate police response, phone 911.

Do not contact the RCMP for any possible infraction of a CEMA order. Instead, report online

Where are enforcement officers located?

Check stations are a measure to ensure that all travellers have the information they need to:

  • prevent the spread of COVID-19; and
  • keep themselves and other Yukoners safe.

Enforcement officers are located:

  • At the Yukon-British Columbia border at the Watson Lake weigh station, or the Yukon-British Columbia border at Junction 37. Enforcement officers are on duty at both locations from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. 7 days a week. 
    • Travellers arriving outside of these hours will be required to stop at an on-site kiosk.
    • They must sign a declaration and submit their self-isolation plan, along with a contact number when they arrive from outside of BC, the NWT or Nunavut.
    • Completing the self-declaration is required by law.
  • Erik Neilson International Airport when flights arrive.
  • Enforcement officers are also collaborating with the Canada Border Services Agency for the following border crossings:
    • Fraser, British Columbia, border crossing;
    • Pleasant Camp, British Columbia, border crossing; and
    • Beaver Creek, Yukon, border crossing.

We also have enforcement staff available to investigate complaints in Whitehorse and other Yukon communities.

How to get a visitor decal

As of July 20, 2020, a person with an out-of-province licence plate can get a decal to show their vehicle is allowed in Yukon. Decals are only issued is certain situations. Find out if you can get a decal

Total travellers 54,305
CEMA complaints 913
Charges laid under CEMA 18
   

We started tracking these figures on April 29, 2020.

CEMA is the Civil Emergency Measures Act

If an outbreak occurs, we can change or revoke these self-isolation exemption measures.

Who does not need to self-isolate when they arrive in Yukon?

  • Critical workers
  • Residents of Yukon, British Columbia, Northwest Territories and Nunavut as long as they:
    • can prove they’re a resident of 1 of those 4 jurisdictions by showing valid identification; and
    • complete a declaration to confirm they have not travelled outside of Yukon, British Columbia, Northwest Territories or Nunavut in the 14 days before they enter Yukon.

Minor children travelling with their parents do not need to show proof of residency. 

Who has to self-isolate in Whitehorse?

  • All residents of Canada who do not live in Yukon, British Columbia, Northwest Territories or Nunavut; this applies even if the person has been in 1 of those 4 regions for 14 days, or longer.
  • Residents of Yukon living in Whitehorse who’ve travelled outside of Yukon, British Columbia, Northwest Territories or Nunavut.
  • Residents of British Columbia, Northwest Territories or Nunavut who've travelled outside out these 3 regions and Yukon in the 14 days before arriving in Yukon.
  • Residents of Yukon, British Columbia, Northwest Territories or Nunavut, who fly into Yukon on a flight that has a stopover outside of these 4 regions.

If you're a Yukoner living in a Yukon community

Yukoners living in communities outside Whitehorse who’ve travelled outside Yukon, British Columbia, Northwest Territories or Nunavut can self-isolate in their home communities.

If you have to self-isolate, you may be eligible for an alternative self-isolation plan.

Where can you self-isolate in Whitehorse?

You’re responsible for covering the cost of your self-isolation accommodation. You cannot self-isolate at a Government of Yukon campground, but you can self-isolate in a hotel or similar accommodation. Email us and we can help you to figure out your self-isolation plan: covid19info@gov.yk.ca.

When you stop at the check station, you will need to provide:

  • valid ID;
  • your name;
  • your cell phone or home phone number;
  • your home address or address where you will be self-isolating; and
  • confirmation that you do not have any symptoms consistent with COVID-19.

Every person has to provide this information when crossing into Yukon.

Proof of residency

If you are a resident of BC, NWT, or Nunavut, you must provide proof of residency. The list below provides some common examples, but other documents that prove your place of residence may be accepted by border enforcement officers.

A government-issued picture ID that also shows your address, such as a:

  • Driver’s license; or
  • BC Services Card. 

Other government-issued ID, together with a:

  • Utility bill from the past month (cell phone bills are not accepted);
  • Signed residential tenancy agreement;
  • Mortgage documentation or property tax bills; or
  • Social assistance benefit confirmation.

All ID must be valid; expired ID is not accepted.

People who'll have to self-isolate

Once through the check station, you must:

  • follow the instructions listed on signage, or given to you by a border officer when you enter Yukon;
  • proceed directly to your home or another suitable safe place;
  • do not stop for groceries or do errands on your way;
  • arrange for someone else to drop off food or provisions for you;
  • avoid unnecessary stops and limit essential stops, such as for gas, as much as possible;
  • if you do stop, practise proper physical distancing by staying 2 metres (6 feet) away from others you may encounter.

Find out how to self-isolate.

Exception to self-isolation 

All people who are not residents of Yukon, British Columbia, Northwest Territories or Nunavut have to self-isolate for 14 days upon arrival in Whitehorse, unless:

  • they're visiting a family member in which case they can self-isolate at their residence in Yukon; or
  • they have a home on a mine or work site that they can self-isolate in with family members only. Learn more about self-isolating at work camps. 

Phone us toll free between 7:30 a.m. and 8 p.m., 7 days a week, 1-877-374-0425.

Email us between 7:30 a.m. and 8 p.m., Monday through Friday, covid19info@gov.yk.ca.

If you:

  • do not have a place where you can safely self-isolate; 
  • you require support, such as picking up medication or groceries; or
  • are in need of mental wellness or substance use care while self-isolation:

Report an infraction

Report a possible infraction of Civil Emergency Measures Act.
Complete the online form
Phone toll free: 1-877-374-0425

Questions

If you have questions about borders and enforcement, email:covid19enforcement@gov.yk.ca.

Anyone with information on suspicious cross-border activities is encouraged to call the CBSA Border Watch Line 1-888-502-9060.

The border between the United States and Canada is closed to all non-essential travel. Americans can travel into Canada if they’re travelling:

  • to Alaska; or
  • from Alaska to the rest of the United States.

Americans travelling through Yukon have to follow a designated travel corridor. We give travellers a map of this route at Yukon borders. 

If you're travelling through Yukon

You're able to transit through Yukon so long as you do so in 24 hours. If you're in transit through Yukon, you'll need to provide confirmation that you do not have any symptoms consistent with COVID-19.

You must also:

  • follow the instructions listed on signage, or given to you by a border officer when you enter Yukon;
  • not stay at territorial campgrounds.
  • avoid stopping in rural communities;
  • avoid stopping for non-essential reasons;
  • practise physical distancing when buying essentials by staying 2 metres (6 feet) away from other people;
  • self-isolate by staying in your room if you must stay in a hotel;
  • pay at the pump if you must stop for gas; and
  • phone 811 if you develop any COVID-19-like symptoms (cough, fever, or difficulty breathing) after making a declaration at the check station.

If you're travelling to Alaska 

The state of Alaska introduced travel guidance. Read Alaska’s health guidance for travellers during the COVID-19 pandemic.

If you're travelling to Northwest Territories

Before you travel, read Northwest Territories travel guidelines.

The Canada Border Services Agency and U.S. Customs are temporarily restricting all non-essential travel across its borders to limit the spread of COVID-19. This is a precautionary measure. Find out about what is considered essential travel

Anyone with information on suspicious cross-border activities is encouraged to call the CBSA Border Watch Line 1-888-502-9060.

You have to have a self-isolation plan if you are not a resident of:

  • Yukon;
  • British Columbia;
  • Northwest Territories; or
  • Nunavut.

You'll be asked to fill this information out on a declaration form when entering Yukon. A self-isolation plan includes:

  • details of the place where you plan to stay in Yukon for the 14-day period of self-isolation;
  • details of any place where you plan to be after the period of self-isolation; and
  • personal contact information.

Find out more about self-isolation.

Orders were put in place under the Civil Emergency Measures Act. Orders are the law and you're required to follow them. If you do not comply you may be fined or face the possibility of imprisonment.

Directions are strong suggestions from the Chief Medical Health Officer that people are asked to follow to ensure public health and safety. Directions are not enforceable. 

Find out the orders and directions in Yukon.

A Civil Emergency Measures Act (CEMA) enforcement officer enforces all orders under CEMA. They:

  • are stationed at Yukon points of entry that are not staffed by the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA);
  • collect contact information of all travellers coming through Yukon or returning home such as details of their 14-day self-isolation plans and declarations of any symptoms of COVID-19; and
  • have the ability to investigate and lay charges to any person in violation of an order under CEMA.

Report a possible infraction of a Civil Emergency Measures Act Order online or phone the toll-free InfoLine at 1-877-374-0425.

Please include all details of your complaint and an investigator will be assigned your file. This investigator will contact you if more information is required.

Anyone with information on suspicious cross-border activities is encouraged to call the CBSA Border Watch Line 1-888-502-9060.

If a complaint is received and an offence has occurred, then a Government of Yukon enforcement officer will follow up. Our approach to enforcement is to educate the public and ask for voluntary compliance before laying any charges.

If there is an emergency or dangerous situation that requires an immediate police response, phone 911.

Do not contact the RCMP for any possible infraction of a CEMA order. Instead, report online

Check stations are a measure to ensure that all travellers have the information they need to:

  • prevent the spread of COVID-19; and
  • keep themselves and other Yukoners safe.

Enforcement officers are located:

  • At the Yukon-British Columbia border at the Watson Lake weigh station, or the Yukon-British Columbia border at Junction 37. Enforcement officers are on duty at both locations from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. 7 days a week. 
    • Travellers arriving outside of these hours will be required to stop at an on-site kiosk.
    • They must sign a declaration and submit their self-isolation plan, along with a contact number when they arrive from outside of BC, the NWT or Nunavut.
    • Completing the self-declaration is required by law.
  • Erik Neilson International Airport when flights arrive.
  • Enforcement officers are also collaborating with the Canada Border Services Agency for the following border crossings:
    • Fraser, British Columbia, border crossing;
    • Pleasant Camp, British Columbia, border crossing; and
    • Beaver Creek, Yukon, border crossing.

We also have enforcement staff available to investigate complaints in Whitehorse and other Yukon communities.

As of July 20, 2020, a person with an out-of-province licence plate can get a decal to show their vehicle is allowed in Yukon. Decals are only issued is certain situations. Find out if you can get a decal