Information current

August 3, 2021

Read exposure notices.

As of August 4, 2021, you will not have to:

  • wear a mask in a public indoor space; and
  • self-isolate when returning from domestic travel.

Restaurants and bars can open at full capacity with no physical distancing at bar tops and counters.

Wearing a mask in Yukon during COVID-19

The best way to stop the spread of COVID-19 is through preventative measures, such as physical distancing and frequent hand washing. Read the mandatory mask order, Ministerial Order 2020/71 and the frequently asked questions about mask use.

Why we’re wearing masks

As of Tuesday, December 1, 2020, you must wear a mask in all indoor public spaces in Yukon. 

These guidelines do not apply to K–12 school settings.

Wearing a mask is an additional tool that, when combined with the Safe 6, can help to reduce the risk of transmitting COVID-19.

Masks alone cannot stop the spread of COVID-19.

Always:

  • stay home when you’re sick;
  • physically distance; and
  • wash your hands.

By wearing masks and following the Safe 6, Yukoners will have the greatest impact on limiting the spread of COVID-19. 

Where you have to wear a mask

You must wear a mask in all common areas and public indoor spaces. 

What’s a common area?

  • An area in a building that is regularly used and accessed by people. This includes:
    • lobbies;
    • hallways;
    • waiting rooms;
    • public bathrooms; and
    • elevators. 
  • A common area can also be part of an indoor public space.

What's a public space?

The following list includes examples of what's considered an indoor public space:

  • Shopping centres, malls and retail businesses such as grocery stores, pharmacies, clothing stores, sporting good stores, liquor stores.
  • Service businesses such as mechanics, dry cleaners and bookkeepers.
  • Locations that provide personal services or healthcare provider services, except if you need to remove the mask to provide or receive the service.
  • Restaurants, bars and other places selling food or drink, except while you’re seated at a table.
  • Places of public worship or a faith gathering.
  • Places for sports, fitness and dance activities, except during a physical activity.
  • Places where non-profit organizations provide goods or services to the public.
  • Movie theatres, art centres, concert halls, billiard halls, museums and libraries.
  • Conference centres, community centres, community halls or other places that host events, courses or workshops.
  • Indoor common areas of:
    • office buildings;
    • government buildings, other than a school;
    • multi-unit residential buildings;
    • hospitals;
    • hotels, bed and breakfasts, rental cabins; and
    • Yukon university campuses, such as libraries, classrooms and hallways.
  • Entrances of daycare centres and day homes.
  • Taxis, vehicles used for commercial ride sharing, shuttles or other vehicles for hire.
  • Public transit bus, or other vehicles transporting the public whether or not a fee is charged.
When you do not have to wear a mask

There are situations or settings that do not require people to wear a mask. These include the following situations:

  • Inside workplaces that do not have public access or provide services to the public.
  • While you're seated at a table in an indoor restaurant or bar or another place selling food or drink.
  • For the time that someone's doing a physical activity including sport, fitness or dance.
  • If someone needs to remove a mask to provide or receive a service. For example, a dental procedure.

Despite the exceptions listed above, nothing prevents an employer or owner of an indoor public space from having reasonable masking requirements.

Who does not have to wear a mask?
  • Children under the age of 5 do not have to wear a mask.
    • Children under the age of 2 should not wear a mask.
    • Children between the ages of 2 and 4 are encouraged to wear a mask if they're supervised. This will depend on their ability to tolerate it, as well as put it on and take it off.
  • People who may be unable to wear a mask or understand the need to wear a mask because of a psychological or health condition, cognitive impairment or an intellectual disability.
  • People speaking during a television or other media news interview or conference, to facilitate communication.

Be respectful of people who cannot wear a mask.

Are masks mandatory and enforceable?

Non-medical masks must now be worn in indoor public places.

This is on the advice of Yukon’s Chief Medical Officer of Health and in accordance with Ministerial Order 2020/71.

With COVID-19 cases increasing across Canada, it’s more important than ever that all Yukoners work together to slow the spread of the virus.

Our most useful tools to ensure people are wearing their masks are:

  • education;
  • reminders;
  • guidance; and
  • support.

These tools are more effective than enforcement but enforcement and fines are possible when required.

What do you do if someone’s not wearing a mask? Can you report them?

We’re asking that everyone consider the health and safety of not only themselves but also that of their family, friends and communities.

The best response to someone not wearing a mask is to show, by example, the desired behaviour.

Business operators should tell clients they must wear a mask in indoor public spaces. Businesses may deny service to customers who refuse to wear a mask.

If someone is not wearing a mask in a public space, you can report them to our enforcement team. They will investigate and encourage voluntary compliance.

Enforcement and fines are the last option.

If you’re concerned for your or someone else’s safety and need an immediate response, contact the RCMP at 911.

What’s a non-medical mask?

Well-designed and well-fitting masks can prevent the spread of your infectious respiratory droplets. They may also help protect you from the infectious respiratory droplets of others.

A non-medical mask is any mask that's:

  • homemade or commercially made: and
  • not regulated for medical use.

A non-medical mask should be:

  • large enough to completely and comfortably cover your nose and mouth without gaping;
  • allow for easy breathing;
  • fit securely to your head with ties or ear loops;
  • maintain its shape after washing and drying;
  • be changed as soon as possible if damp or dirty; and
  • be comfortable.

A non-medical mask can be made of 2 or 3 layers of material fabric, such as cotton or linen, to make sure that droplets do not pass through the fabric.

3 layers are best, but masks with 2 layers are still effective.

What's not a non-medical mask?

Non-medical masks do not include:

  • balaclavas;
  • bandanas;
  • neck warmers;
  • scarves; or
  • other similar face coverings.

Other tools that do not replace non-medical masks include face shields.

Face shields are not masks

Face shields do not replace non-medical masks.

A face shield is used to protect the eyes of the person wearing it.

Using a face shield without a mask does not protect:

  • you from potentially inhaling infectious respiratory droplets exhaled by others; or
  • others from your infectious respiratory droplets, as they can escape around the face shield.
Wearing, removing and looking after your mask

Masks should only be used by 1 person and should never be shared.

When you're wearing a mask, it's important that you try not to touch it. If you do touch your mask or face, make sure you immediately wash your hands.

See the How to wear a non-medical mask poster for more information on how to properly put on and take off a mask or watch this video.

How to put on your non-medical mask 

  1. Wash your hands:
    • in soap and water for at least 20 seconds; or
    • with a hand sanitizer containing at least 60% alcohol.
  2. Inspect the mask and make sure it's clean and dry.
  3. Make sure your hair is away from your face.
  4. Place the mask over your nose and mouth and secure it to your head or ears with ties or elastic loops.
  5. Wash your hands.

How to remove your non-medical mask

You should remove and change your mask if it becomes damp or soiled. You should clean and change non-medical masks often. Holes and damage to cloth masks will further reduce their protective benefits.

  1. Wash your hands.
  2. If you're disposing of your mask, put it in a wastebasket lined with a plastic bag.
  3. If you plan to reuse your mask, remove the mask and put in the washing machine. You can also put the mask in a paper bag if you do not have immediate access to a washing machine.
  4. Wash your hands.

How to clean your mask

  1. Wash it according to the directions of the original material; warmer water is better.
  2. Dry it completely, if possible, in a dryer and on a warm or hot setting.
  3. In order to minimize the spread of germs and particles, do not shake dirty masks.
Find more information

These trusted organizations provide accurate information about masks and face coverings.

How to make your own cloth mask

Download patterns from the Government of Canada.

Hand hygiene

Download our hand washing sign to put up in your workplace or in your home.

Physical distancing

Download our physical distancing posters to put up in your workplace or your home.

As of Tuesday, December 1, 2020, you must wear a mask in all indoor public spaces in Yukon. 

These guidelines do not apply to K–12 school settings.

Wearing a mask is an additional tool that, when combined with the Safe 6, can help to reduce the risk of transmitting COVID-19.

Masks alone cannot stop the spread of COVID-19.

Always:

  • stay home when you’re sick;
  • physically distance; and
  • wash your hands.

By wearing masks and following the Safe 6, Yukoners will have the greatest impact on limiting the spread of COVID-19. 

You must wear a mask in all common areas and public indoor spaces. 

What’s a common area?

  • An area in a building that is regularly used and accessed by people. This includes:
    • lobbies;
    • hallways;
    • waiting rooms;
    • public bathrooms; and
    • elevators. 
  • A common area can also be part of an indoor public space.

What's a public space?

The following list includes examples of what's considered an indoor public space:

  • Shopping centres, malls and retail businesses such as grocery stores, pharmacies, clothing stores, sporting good stores, liquor stores.
  • Service businesses such as mechanics, dry cleaners and bookkeepers.
  • Locations that provide personal services or healthcare provider services, except if you need to remove the mask to provide or receive the service.
  • Restaurants, bars and other places selling food or drink, except while you’re seated at a table.
  • Places of public worship or a faith gathering.
  • Places for sports, fitness and dance activities, except during a physical activity.
  • Places where non-profit organizations provide goods or services to the public.
  • Movie theatres, art centres, concert halls, billiard halls, museums and libraries.
  • Conference centres, community centres, community halls or other places that host events, courses or workshops.
  • Indoor common areas of:
    • office buildings;
    • government buildings, other than a school;
    • multi-unit residential buildings;
    • hospitals;
    • hotels, bed and breakfasts, rental cabins; and
    • Yukon university campuses, such as libraries, classrooms and hallways.
  • Entrances of daycare centres and day homes.
  • Taxis, vehicles used for commercial ride sharing, shuttles or other vehicles for hire.
  • Public transit bus, or other vehicles transporting the public whether or not a fee is charged.

There are situations or settings that do not require people to wear a mask. These include the following situations:

  • Inside workplaces that do not have public access or provide services to the public.
  • While you're seated at a table in an indoor restaurant or bar or another place selling food or drink.
  • For the time that someone's doing a physical activity including sport, fitness or dance.
  • If someone needs to remove a mask to provide or receive a service. For example, a dental procedure.

Despite the exceptions listed above, nothing prevents an employer or owner of an indoor public space from having reasonable masking requirements.

  • Children under the age of 5 do not have to wear a mask.
    • Children under the age of 2 should not wear a mask.
    • Children between the ages of 2 and 4 are encouraged to wear a mask if they're supervised. This will depend on their ability to tolerate it, as well as put it on and take it off.
  • People who may be unable to wear a mask or understand the need to wear a mask because of a psychological or health condition, cognitive impairment or an intellectual disability.
  • People speaking during a television or other media news interview or conference, to facilitate communication.

Be respectful of people who cannot wear a mask.

Non-medical masks must now be worn in indoor public places.

This is on the advice of Yukon’s Chief Medical Officer of Health and in accordance with Ministerial Order 2020/71.

With COVID-19 cases increasing across Canada, it’s more important than ever that all Yukoners work together to slow the spread of the virus.

Our most useful tools to ensure people are wearing their masks are:

  • education;
  • reminders;
  • guidance; and
  • support.

These tools are more effective than enforcement but enforcement and fines are possible when required.

We’re asking that everyone consider the health and safety of not only themselves but also that of their family, friends and communities.

The best response to someone not wearing a mask is to show, by example, the desired behaviour.

Business operators should tell clients they must wear a mask in indoor public spaces. Businesses may deny service to customers who refuse to wear a mask.

If someone is not wearing a mask in a public space, you can report them to our enforcement team. They will investigate and encourage voluntary compliance.

Enforcement and fines are the last option.

If you’re concerned for your or someone else’s safety and need an immediate response, contact the RCMP at 911.

Well-designed and well-fitting masks can prevent the spread of your infectious respiratory droplets. They may also help protect you from the infectious respiratory droplets of others.

A non-medical mask is any mask that's:

  • homemade or commercially made: and
  • not regulated for medical use.

A non-medical mask should be:

  • large enough to completely and comfortably cover your nose and mouth without gaping;
  • allow for easy breathing;
  • fit securely to your head with ties or ear loops;
  • maintain its shape after washing and drying;
  • be changed as soon as possible if damp or dirty; and
  • be comfortable.

A non-medical mask can be made of 2 or 3 layers of material fabric, such as cotton or linen, to make sure that droplets do not pass through the fabric.

3 layers are best, but masks with 2 layers are still effective.

Non-medical masks do not include:

  • balaclavas;
  • bandanas;
  • neck warmers;
  • scarves; or
  • other similar face coverings.

Other tools that do not replace non-medical masks include face shields.

Face shields are not masks

Face shields do not replace non-medical masks.

A face shield is used to protect the eyes of the person wearing it.

Using a face shield without a mask does not protect:

  • you from potentially inhaling infectious respiratory droplets exhaled by others; or
  • others from your infectious respiratory droplets, as they can escape around the face shield.

Masks should only be used by 1 person and should never be shared.

When you're wearing a mask, it's important that you try not to touch it. If you do touch your mask or face, make sure you immediately wash your hands.

See the How to wear a non-medical mask poster for more information on how to properly put on and take off a mask or watch this video.

How to put on your non-medical mask 

  1. Wash your hands:
    • in soap and water for at least 20 seconds; or
    • with a hand sanitizer containing at least 60% alcohol.
  2. Inspect the mask and make sure it's clean and dry.
  3. Make sure your hair is away from your face.
  4. Place the mask over your nose and mouth and secure it to your head or ears with ties or elastic loops.
  5. Wash your hands.

How to remove your non-medical mask

You should remove and change your mask if it becomes damp or soiled. You should clean and change non-medical masks often. Holes and damage to cloth masks will further reduce their protective benefits.

  1. Wash your hands.
  2. If you're disposing of your mask, put it in a wastebasket lined with a plastic bag.
  3. If you plan to reuse your mask, remove the mask and put in the washing machine. You can also put the mask in a paper bag if you do not have immediate access to a washing machine.
  4. Wash your hands.

How to clean your mask

  1. Wash it according to the directions of the original material; warmer water is better.
  2. Dry it completely, if possible, in a dryer and on a warm or hot setting.
  3. In order to minimize the spread of germs and particles, do not shake dirty masks.

These trusted organizations provide accurate information about masks and face coverings.

How to make your own cloth mask

Download patterns from the Government of Canada.

Hand hygiene

Download our hand washing sign to put up in your workplace or in your home.

Physical distancing

Download our physical distancing posters to put up in your workplace or your home.