Learn about the Yukon First Nations Procurement Policy

The Yukon First Nations Procurement Policy enhances economic outcomes for Yukon First Nations people and businesses. It does this by providing Yukon First Nations people and businesses with better opportunities to take part in Government of Yukon contracts (procurements).

The policy will achieve these benefits while maintaining a competitive procurement process for all Yukon businesses.

Developed together

We co-developed the policy with Yukon First Nations. We've now approved it and Yukon First Nations have formally endorsed it.

Reconciliation

The policy honours Chapter 22 of the Yukon First Nations Final Agreements. This is a critical step in the territory’s journey towards reconciliation.

Growing together

The policy encourages Yukon First Nations businesses and non-Yukon First Nations businesses to partner for the territory’s benefit. By working together, we can:

  • grow our businesses;
  • create jobs; and
  • generate new and better economic opportunities.

Working with industry

Together with Yukon First Nations, we're working with industry to develop the tools and processes needed to implement the policy.

Continuous improvement

We'll be establishing a committee to:

  • monitor and review the policy; and
  • make recommendations for potential changes and improvements.

Implementation

The policy came into effect on February 22, 2021. Implementation is being phased to:

  • give Yukon businesses and Yukon First Nations time to prepare; and
  • get all the required tools and templates in place.

Yukon First Nations Business Registry

The Yukon First Nations Business Registry is a publicly accessible database. It helps Yukon First Nations businesses to advertise their goods and services to:

  • the public;
  • governments; and
  • other businesses.

Yukon First Nations business owners can add themselves to the database by visiting the registry.

Access training

Our Procurement Support Centre offers training on the new policy to:

  • businesses;
  • Yukon First Nations businesses; and
  • people who are interested in learning more about the policy.

Pre-recorded tutorials are available on our training website, YGLearn. You'll need a YGLearn account to access the videos. Instructions on how to create an account are included below. You can watch the videos at any time.

Creating a YGLearn account

To create a YGLearn account, follow these steps:

  1. Use a browser other than Internet Explorer such as Chrome, Firefox or Safari.
  2. Go to the public course catalogue.
  3. Select the orange Enrol button.
  4. Register for the YGLearn platform by selecting Register.
  5. Enter your name, email and a password, then select Sign-up.
  6. Once the page reloads, select Enrol again.
  7. You're now enrolled.
What does the new policy mean for non-Yukon First Nations businesses in Yukon

We designed the policy with Yukon First Nations so it supports a competitive procurement process for all Yukon businesses. The policy represents a genuine opportunity for non-Yukon First Nations Yukon businesses.

By partnering with Yukon First Nations, these businesses will have an edge over competitors from outside the territory. These partnerships can take many forms, including:

  • having Yukon First Nations employees; or
  • sub-contracting to a Yukon First Nations business.
What's a bid value reduction?

Bid value reductions are a mathematical way of re-ranking bids to reflect increased participation by Yukon First Nations businesses and people.

How will the bid value reductions work?

Both Yukon First Nations and non-Yukon First Nations businesses can benefit from bid value reductions.

Bid value reductions are a win-win for all businesses in Yukon. They will:

  • incentivize partnerships among Yukon businesses that will grow the territory’s economy; and
  • increase competition for bids that benefit Yukon taxpayers.

The bid value reduction, which will not come into effect before April 26, 2021, will apply to:

  • price- and value-driven procurements; and
  • invitational and open tenders.

The use of bid value reductions will be:

  • continually tracked and assessed by the PS Centre and the government's Monitor and Review Committee; and
  • reviewed every 2 years.

Yukon First Nations are eligible in 4 areas:

  • the level of Yukon First Nations ownership;
  • the level of Yukon First Nations ownership of a subcontractor;
  • whether the business’s primary location is in a community; and
  • the level of additional Yukon First Nations labour.

Non-Yukon First Nations businesses can benefit from:

  • partnering with Yukon First Nations businesses;
  • subcontracting to Yukon First Nations businesses; and
  • employing additional Yukon First Nations labour.
How does the policy work with the new vendor performance review system?

The vendor performance review system, which is currently under development, establishes a record for each supplier that provides goods or services to the government in relation to 5 performance indicators.

1 of the indicators the program tracks is a supplier’s performance in meeting commitments under the policy. The likelihood of winning future contracts is increased for companies that:

  • perform well in terms of meeting commitments to use Yukon First Nations subcontractors; and
  • hire Yukon First Nations people.

We'll work with suppliers to help them improve performance. We'll collect scores through Yukon bids&tenders, which will be used by procurement authorities. We're aiming for it to begin in the fall of 2021.

What are the eligibility criteria for a Yukon First Nations business?

A Yukon First Nations business needs to meet 1 of the following criteria to be eligible:

  1. A corporation or not-for-profit corporation where 1 or more Yukon First Nations is the direct or beneficial owner of 100% of the shares of the corporation.
  2. A sole proprietorship owned by a Yukon First Nation person.
  3. A partnership or limited partnership where at least 50% of the partnership is owned by a Yukon First Nation person or an organization described in 1 or 2.
  4. A corporation with at least 51 per cent of the corporation’s voting shares owned by a Yukon First Nation person or an organization described in 1 or 2.
  5. A not-for-profit organization in good standing under the Societies Act with Yukon First Nations people comprising at least 51% of its membership.

A sole proprietorship owned by a non-Yukon First Nations person, which supports a Yukon First Nations spouse or common law partner, and/or a Yukon First Nations family, may qualify as a Yukon First Nations business.

We'll engage the relevant Yukon First Nation government during its review.

How will we ensure businesses fulfil the requirements to be eligible for the 15% bid reduction?

There's a contract enforcement section in the policy. We'll use the vendor performance review program to assess whether businesses are meeting their commitments under the policy. The system will include penalties for those that do not.

How will we ensure businesses fulfil the commitments made in bids regarding First Nations benefits?

We'll have a verification process to determine which businesses meet the definition of a Yukon First Nations business.

There's a contract enforcement section in the policy. The PS Centre will add specific enforcement terms to contract templates to link the contract back to the commitments that businesses make when bidding.

Also, we'll use the vendor performance review program, once it's ready, to assess whether businesses are meeting their commitments under the policy. We'll then use the results of the vendor performance review program in future procurements. This will affect the likelihood of businesses winning future contracts.

We designed the policy with Yukon First Nations so it supports a competitive procurement process for all Yukon businesses. The policy represents a genuine opportunity for non-Yukon First Nations Yukon businesses.

By partnering with Yukon First Nations, these businesses will have an edge over competitors from outside the territory. These partnerships can take many forms, including:

  • having Yukon First Nations employees; or
  • sub-contracting to a Yukon First Nations business.

Bid value reductions are a mathematical way of re-ranking bids to reflect increased participation by Yukon First Nations businesses and people.

Both Yukon First Nations and non-Yukon First Nations businesses can benefit from bid value reductions.

Bid value reductions are a win-win for all businesses in Yukon. They will:

  • incentivize partnerships among Yukon businesses that will grow the territory’s economy; and
  • increase competition for bids that benefit Yukon taxpayers.

The bid value reduction, which will not come into effect before April 26, 2021, will apply to:

  • price- and value-driven procurements; and
  • invitational and open tenders.

The use of bid value reductions will be:

  • continually tracked and assessed by the PS Centre and the government's Monitor and Review Committee; and
  • reviewed every 2 years.

Yukon First Nations are eligible in 4 areas:

  • the level of Yukon First Nations ownership;
  • the level of Yukon First Nations ownership of a subcontractor;
  • whether the business’s primary location is in a community; and
  • the level of additional Yukon First Nations labour.

Non-Yukon First Nations businesses can benefit from:

  • partnering with Yukon First Nations businesses;
  • subcontracting to Yukon First Nations businesses; and
  • employing additional Yukon First Nations labour.

The vendor performance review system, which is currently under development, establishes a record for each supplier that provides goods or services to the government in relation to 5 performance indicators.

1 of the indicators the program tracks is a supplier’s performance in meeting commitments under the policy. The likelihood of winning future contracts is increased for companies that:

  • perform well in terms of meeting commitments to use Yukon First Nations subcontractors; and
  • hire Yukon First Nations people.

We'll work with suppliers to help them improve performance. We'll collect scores through Yukon bids&tenders, which will be used by procurement authorities. We're aiming for it to begin in the fall of 2021.

A Yukon First Nations business needs to meet 1 of the following criteria to be eligible:

  1. A corporation or not-for-profit corporation where 1 or more Yukon First Nations is the direct or beneficial owner of 100% of the shares of the corporation.
  2. A sole proprietorship owned by a Yukon First Nation person.
  3. A partnership or limited partnership where at least 50% of the partnership is owned by a Yukon First Nation person or an organization described in 1 or 2.
  4. A corporation with at least 51 per cent of the corporation’s voting shares owned by a Yukon First Nation person or an organization described in 1 or 2.
  5. A not-for-profit organization in good standing under the Societies Act with Yukon First Nations people comprising at least 51% of its membership.

A sole proprietorship owned by a non-Yukon First Nations person, which supports a Yukon First Nations spouse or common law partner, and/or a Yukon First Nations family, may qualify as a Yukon First Nations business.

We'll engage the relevant Yukon First Nation government during its review.

There's a contract enforcement section in the policy. We'll use the vendor performance review program to assess whether businesses are meeting their commitments under the policy. The system will include penalties for those that do not.

We'll have a verification process to determine which businesses meet the definition of a Yukon First Nations business.

There's a contract enforcement section in the policy. The PS Centre will add specific enforcement terms to contract templates to link the contract back to the commitments that businesses make when bidding.

Also, we'll use the vendor performance review program, once it's ready, to assess whether businesses are meeting their commitments under the policy. We'll then use the results of the vendor performance review program in future procurements. This will affect the likelihood of businesses winning future contracts.

Contact: 

For more information, phone us at 867-667-5385.