Information current

November 29, 2020

We're in Phase 3 of our COVID-19 Path Forward plan. Watch the latest video update. For medical questions or if you feel ill, phone 811, or launch the COVID-19 self-assessment tool.

Read our self-isolation rules for everyone entering Yukon.

Sport and recreation guidelines: COVID-19

Yukoners are seeking guidance on actions that enable sport organizations and activities to operate while lowering the risk of exposure to COVID-19 and spread of the virus. It's important that people responsible for outdoor and indoor sport and recreation activities:

  • consider possible risks when operating during the COVID‑19 pandemic; and
  • implement risk-mitigation measures.

This guidance encourages sports and recreation organisations to engage in non-contact activities in a safe and responsible manner. See Contact Sports guidelines released August 26, 2020, for sports like hockey and soccer where there's contact during play.

Make sure you have read and incorporated the Safe 6 into your planning as recommended by the Chief Medical Officer of Health. In particular:

  • maintain physical distancing – keep 2 metres (6 feet) away from anyone who’s not a member of your social bubble;
  • wash your hands frequently with soap and water, or use hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol; and
  • stay home if you’re feeling sick, even if your symptoms are mild.

COVID-19 is most commonly spread from someone who's infected through:

  • respiratory droplets generated when a person coughs or sneezes;
  • close prolonged personal contact, such as touching; or
  • touching something with the virus on it, such as shared equipment, then touching your mouth, nose or eyes without washing your hands.

Where possible, follow guidance provided by your sport’s national governing body, and your local sports governing body so long as these meet the Chief Medical Officer of Health's recommendations:

  • physical distancing;
  • cleaning procedures; and
  • gathering limits

What else you need to know

These are public health guidelines. Organisers still need to consider other factors, such as requirements or advice from their insurance providers, when planning activities.

Close interactions

  • Organise activities to minimize close interactions.
  • Eliminate team huddles and fist-bump or handshake routines at the beginning and end of games.

Travel within Yukon

Within Yukon, coaches or facilitators travelling between communities should follow current guidance from the Chief Medical Office of Health. It's important to honour the wishes of the municipalities and First Nations whose land you intend to visit. Check whether the local community or First Nation has requested that people refrain from visiting their community.

Coaches or facilitators travelling from outside of Yukon must adhere to all current Yukon public health measures.

Who needs an operational plan

Sports and recreation organizations that employ staff (for example, coaches, referees or coordinators) need to create an operational plan for workplace health and safety reasons.

Public recreation centres and other communal facilities should all have operational plans in place. User groups such as sports teams are required to follow the venue’s operational plan.

How many people can attend a sports event

Organised gatherings, including sports events, are limited to 50 people indoors and 100 people outdoors, with physical distancing. Applications for events involving larger numbers will be assessed on a case-by-case basis.

  • Activities that can be conducted with appropriate physical distancing of at least 2 metres (6 feet) between participants, unless the people are from the same household.
  • Indoor or outdoor activities that can be conducted in groups of not more than 50 athletes indoors and 100 athletes outdoors, and with adequate spacing (1 person per 5 square metres or 54 square feet).
  • Many groups of not more than 50 people indoors and 100 people outdoors may be present in the same area as long as there is enough space for proper physical distancing. Different groups cannot intermingle.
  • Some sharing of sporting equipment is permitted such as kicking a soccer ball, hitting a tennis ball, use of a skipping rope, weights, and mats. Encourage participants to bring their own personal equipment where possible, such as yoga mats, to limit sharing of equipment.
  • Non-contact skills training is permitted. Accidental contact may occur but no deliberate body contact drills. No wrestling, holding, tackling or binding.
  • Activities in fitness studios and commercial gyms, including bootcamps, yoga, Pilates, dance classes (for example, barre, ballet, hip hop, not-partnered), cycling spin classes are permitted if other measures are met.

  • Participants should not attend if they're experiencing a cough, fever, shortness of breath, or are feeling unwell.
  • If a participant develops any COVID-19 like symptoms during the activity, they should leave immediately, and all equipment they used should be disinfected.
  • Organizers must provide hygiene education, supervised hand hygiene as appropriate, and hygiene supplies such as soap and water, hand sanitizer, and paper towels.
  • All common areas and high touch surfaces should be cleaned and disinfected at the end of each day or if visibly dirty. This includes washrooms, common tables, desks, light switches, handrails and door handles.
  • Equipment including sticks, pucks, and balls should be disinfected after use. Some shared equipment that's touched less often, such as nets, can be cleaned when set-up or taken down, or at the end of each day.
  • "Get in, train and get out" – be prepared for training prior to arrival at venue, as much as possible. Minimize the need to use or gather in change rooms or bathrooms.
  • Physical distancing must be respected in change rooms. Consider staggering change times to accommodate this, or wear a mask when physical distancing is not possible.
  • Have cleaning protocols in place for equipment and facilities.
  • Follow spacing and gathering requirements: no more than 50 people indoors and 100 outdoors for organized events.
  • Social gatherings where sports are being played (for example, pick-up hockey), as opposed to organized sports activities (for example, a game organized by  Whitehorse Minor Hockey), should not have more than 10 participants indoors or 50 participants outdoors.
  • The wearing of masks is recommended in common areas such as change rooms and hallways where physical distancing cannot be maintained.
  • Items such as towels or water bottles should not be shared.
  • First aid attendants should use appropriate personal protective equipment.
  • A record of participants should be kept to enable contact tracing if the need arises. These records should be kept for a minimum of 21 days.

Athletes require individualised consideration and assessment at all stages of a return to sport. Some athletes will have medical conditions that will require detailed planning and consultation with their regular treating medical team prior to a return to formal training and competition or at different stages of a return to sport.

Specific equipment (for example, wheelchairs or prostheses) may require regular cleaning.

Athletes and spectators should be separated. Spectators should:

  • sanitise their hands when they arrive and when they leave a venue;
  • maintain physical distancing of at least 2 metres (6 feet) from other spectators and athletes; and
  • not attend if they’re feeling sick, even if their symptoms are mild.

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Why we provide guidance

Yukoners are seeking guidance on actions that enable sport organizations and activities to operate while lowering the risk of exposure to COVID-19 and spread of the virus. It's important that people responsible for outdoor and indoor sport and recreation activities:

  • consider possible risks when operating during the COVID‑19 pandemic; and
  • implement risk-mitigation measures.

This guidance encourages sports and recreation organisations to engage in non-contact activities in a safe and responsible manner. See Contact Sports guidelines released August 26, 2020, for sports like hockey and soccer where there's contact during play.

Make sure you have read and incorporated the Safe 6 into your planning as recommended by the Chief Medical Officer of Health. In particular:

  • maintain physical distancing – keep 2 metres (6 feet) away from anyone who’s not a member of your social bubble;
  • wash your hands frequently with soap and water, or use hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol; and
  • stay home if you’re feeling sick, even if your symptoms are mild.
What you need to know about the spread of COVID-19

COVID-19 is most commonly spread from someone who's infected through:

  • respiratory droplets generated when a person coughs or sneezes;
  • close prolonged personal contact, such as touching; or
  • touching something with the virus on it, such as shared equipment, then touching your mouth, nose or eyes without washing your hands.
General guidelines

Where possible, follow guidance provided by your sport’s national governing body, and your local sports governing body so long as these meet the Chief Medical Officer of Health's recommendations:

  • physical distancing;
  • cleaning procedures; and
  • gathering limits

What else you need to know

These are public health guidelines. Organisers still need to consider other factors, such as requirements or advice from their insurance providers, when planning activities.

Close interactions

  • Organise activities to minimize close interactions.
  • Eliminate team huddles and fist-bump or handshake routines at the beginning and end of games.

Travel within Yukon

Within Yukon, coaches or facilitators travelling between communities should follow current guidance from the Chief Medical Office of Health. It's important to honour the wishes of the municipalities and First Nations whose land you intend to visit. Check whether the local community or First Nation has requested that people refrain from visiting their community.

Coaches or facilitators travelling from outside of Yukon must adhere to all current Yukon public health measures.

Who needs an operational plan

Sports and recreation organizations that employ staff (for example, coaches, referees or coordinators) need to create an operational plan for workplace health and safety reasons.

Public recreation centres and other communal facilities should all have operational plans in place. User groups such as sports teams are required to follow the venue’s operational plan.

How many people can attend a sports event

Organised gatherings, including sports events, are limited to 50 people indoors and 100 people outdoors, with physical distancing. Applications for events involving larger numbers will be assessed on a case-by-case basis.

Permitted activities
  • Activities that can be conducted with appropriate physical distancing of at least 2 metres (6 feet) between participants, unless the people are from the same household.
  • Indoor or outdoor activities that can be conducted in groups of not more than 50 athletes indoors and 100 athletes outdoors, and with adequate spacing (1 person per 5 square metres or 54 square feet).
  • Many groups of not more than 50 people indoors and 100 people outdoors may be present in the same area as long as there is enough space for proper physical distancing. Different groups cannot intermingle.
  • Some sharing of sporting equipment is permitted such as kicking a soccer ball, hitting a tennis ball, use of a skipping rope, weights, and mats. Encourage participants to bring their own personal equipment where possible, such as yoga mats, to limit sharing of equipment.
  • Non-contact skills training is permitted. Accidental contact may occur but no deliberate body contact drills. No wrestling, holding, tackling or binding.
  • Activities in fitness studios and commercial gyms, including bootcamps, yoga, Pilates, dance classes (for example, barre, ballet, hip hop, not-partnered), cycling spin classes are permitted if other measures are met.
Cleaning, hygiene and public health
  • Participants should not attend if they're experiencing a cough, fever, shortness of breath, or are feeling unwell.
  • If a participant develops any COVID-19 like symptoms during the activity, they should leave immediately, and all equipment they used should be disinfected.
  • Organizers must provide hygiene education, supervised hand hygiene as appropriate, and hygiene supplies such as soap and water, hand sanitizer, and paper towels.
  • All common areas and high touch surfaces should be cleaned and disinfected at the end of each day or if visibly dirty. This includes washrooms, common tables, desks, light switches, handrails and door handles.
  • Equipment including sticks, pucks, and balls should be disinfected after use. Some shared equipment that's touched less often, such as nets, can be cleaned when set-up or taken down, or at the end of each day.
  • "Get in, train and get out" – be prepared for training prior to arrival at venue, as much as possible. Minimize the need to use or gather in change rooms or bathrooms.
  • Physical distancing must be respected in change rooms. Consider staggering change times to accommodate this, or wear a mask when physical distancing is not possible.
  • Have cleaning protocols in place for equipment and facilities.
  • Follow spacing and gathering requirements: no more than 50 people indoors and 100 outdoors for organized events.
  • Social gatherings where sports are being played (for example, pick-up hockey), as opposed to organized sports activities (for example, a game organized by  Whitehorse Minor Hockey), should not have more than 10 participants indoors or 50 participants outdoors.
  • The wearing of masks is recommended in common areas such as change rooms and hallways where physical distancing cannot be maintained.
  • Items such as towels or water bottles should not be shared.
  • First aid attendants should use appropriate personal protective equipment.
  • A record of participants should be kept to enable contact tracing if the need arises. These records should be kept for a minimum of 21 days.
Athletes with disabilities

Athletes require individualised consideration and assessment at all stages of a return to sport. Some athletes will have medical conditions that will require detailed planning and consultation with their regular treating medical team prior to a return to formal training and competition or at different stages of a return to sport.

Specific equipment (for example, wheelchairs or prostheses) may require regular cleaning.

Spectators, additional personnel

Athletes and spectators should be separated. Spectators should:

  • sanitise their hands when they arrive and when they leave a venue;
  • maintain physical distancing of at least 2 metres (6 feet) from other spectators and athletes; and
  • not attend if they’re feeling sick, even if their symptoms are mild.