This is our shot

Sleeves up, Yukon. The future is looking bright.

A safe and effective COVID-19 vaccine has arrived in Yukon and suddenly there’s light on the horizon.

Yukon is getting enough vaccine to immunize 75% of the eligible population within the 1st 3 months of the year.

Priority groups were identified by the National Advisory Committee on Immunization (NACI) and are supported by Yukon’s Chief Medical Officer of Health.

Starting January 18, vaccine clinics will begin in rural Yukon communities and limited clinics will start in Whitehorse.

For these 1st weeks in Whitehorse, immunizations will be available to:

  • high risk health-care workers who may care for or be in contact with COVID-19 patients;
  • older adults (starting with 70 years and older); and
  • people who are marginalized and living in group settings, such as the Whitehorse Emergency Shelter and Whitehorse Correctional Centre.

During the 1st 2 weeks of January, we immunized residents and staff of long-term care homes in Whitehorse. Read about the Moderna vaccine and COVID-19 vaccine after care instructions.

Currently, appointments can be booked in Beaver Creek, Old Crow, Watson Lake and Whitehorse for those over 70. If you would like to phone to book your appointment for these 3 communities and priority groups, please call 1-877-374-0425.



Book your appointment

Whether you live in Whitehorse or in another Yukon community, you will need to book an appointment to receive your vaccine.

You can book an appointment the week before the clinic. You can book appointments ahead of time or the same day.

See the community-specific links below to book your appointment online or call 1-877-374-0425.

Beaver Creek

Date: January 21

Time: 12 to 3:30 p.m.

Location: Beaver Creek Community Centre

Call to book: 1-877-374-0425

Book your appointment online 

Burwash Landing and Destruction Bay

Date: February 2

Time: 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Location: to be confirmed

Check back soon to book your appointment.

Carcross and Tagish

Date: January 26

Time: 1 to 6 p.m.

Location: to be confirmed

 

Date: January 27

Time: 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Location: to be confirmed

Check back soon to book your appointment.

Carmacks

Date: February 1

Time: 2 to 7 p.m.

Location: to be confirmed

 

Date: February 2

Time: 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.

Location: to be confirmed

Check back soon to book your appointment.

Dawson City

Date: January 26

Time: 3 to 7 p.m.

Location: to be confirmed

 

Date: January 27 and 28

Time: 9 a.m. to 7:30 p.m.

Location: to be confirmed

 

Date: January 29

Time: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Location: to be confirmed

Check back soon to book your appointment.

Faro

Date: February 3

Time: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Location: to be confirmed

Check back soon to book your appointment.

Haines Junction

Date: February 3

Time: 12 to 8 p.m.

Location: to be confirmed

 

Date: February 4

Time: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Location: to be confirmed

Check back soon to book your appointment.

Mayo

Date: February 5

Time: 3 to 8 p.m.

Location: to be confirmed

 

Date: February 6

Time: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Location: to be confirmed

Check back soon to book your appointment.

Old Crow

Date: January 22

Time: 12 to 4:30 p.m.

Location: Chief Zzeh Gittlit School

Call to book: 1-877-374-0425

Book your appointment online 

Pelly Crossing

Date: January 29

Time: 11 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Location: to be confirmed

Check back soon to book your appointment.

Ross River

Date: February 4

Time: 12 to 4 p.m.

Location: to be confirmed

Check back soon to book your appointment.

Teslin

Date: January 25

Time: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Location: to be confirmed

Check back soon to book your appointment.

Watson Lake

Date: January 18 and 19

Time: 9:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m.

Location: Watson Lake Recreation Centre

Call to book: 1-877-374-0425

Book your appointment online 

Whitehorse (including Ibex Valley, Marsh Lake and Mount Lorne)

Age 70 and older

Date: Starting January 19

Time: 8:15 a.m. to 7:30 p.m.

Location: Yukon Convention Centre

Call to book: 1-877-374-0425

Book your appointment online 

Age 60 and older

Date: Starting February 1

Time: 8:15 a.m. to 7:30 p.m.

Location: Yukon Convention Centre

Check back soon to book your appointment.

All residents, age 18 and over

Date: Starting February 10

Time: 8:15 a.m. to 7:30 p.m.

Location: Yukon Convention Centre

Check back soon to book your appointment.





Why get vaccinated

Why should I get the vaccine?

COVID-19 spreads easily and you can pass it on even if you do not have any symptoms. Widespread immunization is the best way to protect Yukoners. Safe and effective vaccines will reduce the spread of the virus that causes COVID-19. Over time, this will allow Yukoners to live with fewer restrictions.

Of people diagnosed with COVID-19 in Canada, 1 in 13 require hospitalization and about 3 out of every 100 die. Even people with mild symptoms may feel unwell for a long time after a COVID-19 infection.



Is the vaccine safe and effective?

How do I know the vaccine is safe?

Just like every vaccine we use in Canada, this one is Health Canada approved, which means it’s a vaccine you can trust.

Health Canada-approved vaccines go through 3 stages of development:

  • the exploratory stage;
  • the pre-clinical stage; and
  • the clinical stage.

In the exploratory stage, scientists do research. This helps to find vaccines that could help us develop immunity to a disease before being exposed to it.

In the pre-clinical stage, scientists look for safety concerns. This is done before vaccines are tested in humans.

Promising vaccine candidates move on to the clinical stage. This is the stage where they are first tested in humans. Phase 3 studies involve thousands of volunteer participants. They compare groups that received a vaccine to those that didn’t to answer whether it works and is safe for use.

Closely following these 3 stages ensures high quality products and trustworthy results. It’s a proven and world-class regulatory system.

How does the vaccine protect me from COVID-19?

A vaccine is a way to build your immune system. The Moderna vaccine teaches our bodies to produce protection to prevent us from getting sick if we're exposed to the COVID-19 virus. 

In a large study where people were given 2 doses of the Moderna vaccine, they were 94.1% less likely to become sick with COVID-19.

What happens if not enough people get the vaccine?

The pandemic won’t end and neither will the restrictions on our day-to-day lives. In order for Yukon to reach “herd protection” levels, approximately 75% of our population must be vaccinated. The more people who get the vaccine, the greater the protection everyone in the territory will have from COVID-19, allowing us to live with fewer and fewer restrictions.

Why and how was a COVID-19 vaccine discovered so much faster than other vaccines?

Simply put, because there’s nothing normal about a pandemic. The efforts to find a vaccine for COVID-19 have been on a scale that’s never been seen before. With so many resources put towards it, this vaccine was developed in record time. While the need to deliver the vaccine quickly was important, no steps in the approval process were missed. Instead, with more resources came faster results.

Why is Yukon getting the Moderna vaccine before many other places in Canada?

The Moderna vaccine can be transported between remote locations relatively easily. This makes it a good fit for Yukon and the other northern territories.

What are the common side effects?

Just like any medicine or supplement you take, vaccines can have possible side effects. These side effects are almost always very mild and show that your immune system is working well. The most common side effects include:

  • pain, redness or swelling where the needle was given;
  • tiredness;
  • headache;
  • muscle pain;
  • joint pain;
  • nausea or vomiting;
  • chills;
  • fever; or
  • enlarged lymph nodes (swollen glands) in the underarm.

What is my risk of having serious side effects?

In a large study, half of the people who received the Moderna vaccine were monitored for at least 2 months. No serious side effects have been found to date. People in studies who received the vaccine continue to be monitored for longer-term side effects. 

Very rarely, a vaccine can cause an allergic reaction. Symptoms of an allergic reaction include:

  • hives (bumps on the skin that are often itchy);
  • swelling of the face, tongue or throat; or
  • difficulty breathing

Staff at the vaccine clinic are prepared to manage an allergic reaction if it happens. Get immediate medical care if you develop any of these symptoms.

There is so much conflicting information out there. Who do I trust?

When you look for information online, make sure it’s from a trusted source. The federal or Yukon government health websites are examples. Your health-care provider is another great trusted source. Don’t hesitate to ask them your questions.



Vaccine clinics

Where and when do I get the vaccine?

Vaccination locations and schedules can be found here. You will need to book an appointment.

How is the vaccine given?

The vaccine is given as a needle in the upper arm. You will need 2 doses, given 1 month apart. Getting your 2nd dose ensures the vaccine is most effective.

What do I need to bring to my vaccination appointment?

Bring your Yukon health-care card or proof of Yukon residency. You should also bring a mask and your immunization record if you have it. Wear a loose-fitting or short-sleeved shirt so that your upper arm can be reached.

What COVID-19 safety measures will be in place at the vaccine clinics?

To prevent the spread of COVID-19 you must:

  • wear a mask;
  • clean or sanitize your hands;
  • stay 2 metres (6 feet) apart from other people; and
  • stay home if you're sick and rebook your appointment if you're experiencing any COVID-19 symptoms.

Staff at the vaccine clinic will wear masks and clean their hands before and after each client.

What should I do if I have a reaction to the vaccine?

You’ll be asked to wait at least 15 minutes after you receive the vaccine to be sure you’re feeling well. Tell a health-care provider right away if you feel unwell during that wait time.

After you leave the clinic, call 911 right away if you develop any serious symptoms or symptoms of an allergic reaction.

What should I do if I miss my 2nd dose of the vaccine?

Return for your 2nd dose as soon as possible, or talk to your health-care provider.



Who can and cannot get vaccinated

If you’re 17 or younger

Do not get the vaccine if you’re 17 years old or younger. You can get the vaccine if you’re 18 and older.

If you have symptoms that could be COVID-19

Do not get vaccinated if you have any symptoms that could be due to COVID-19. This is so that you do not spread the infection to others. For advice about if and when you’re able to get vaccinated:

  • talk with your health-care provider; or
  • call 811.

You have or have had COVID-19

You should not be vaccinated while infectious or if you still feel unwell from a recent COVID-19 infection, so that you do not spread infection to others.

You can be vaccinated if you're no longer infectious and are feeling better from a COVID-19 infection.

If you’re pregnant or breastfeeding

If you are at high risk of exposure to COVID-19 infection, or of developing severe disease, talk to your health-care provider to make a decision about vaccination.

If you’re planning to be pregnant

If you’re planning to become pregnant, delay conception until at least 28 days have passed after your 2nd dose of COVID-19 vaccine.

If you had a severe reaction to a previous COVID-19 vaccine dose

You should not get the vaccine if you had a severe reaction to a previous dose of a COVID-19 vaccine, including an allergic reaction. Do not get vaccinated until an allergist or another health-care provider determines it's safe. 

If you have an autoimmune condition or problems with your immune system

Please talk to your health-care provider before being immunized. You may or may not be eligible to receive this vaccine.

If you’ve received another vaccine in the past 14 days

If you’ve had another vaccine that's not a COVID-19 vaccine in the past 14 days, wait for 14 days from that last vaccine to receive your COVID-19 vaccine.

If you've an allergy to polyethylene glycol (PEG) or an unknown allergy

You should not get the vaccine. Talk with your health-care provider if you’re known to be allergic to polyethylene glycol or have had an allergic reaction from an unknown cause.

About polyethylene glycol (PEG)

Polyethylene glycol (PEG) can rarely cause allergic reactions and is found in products such as medications, bowel preparation products for colonoscopy, laxatives, cough syrups, cosmetics, skin creams, medical products used on the skin and during operations, toothpaste, contact lenses and contact lens solution. PEG also can be found in foods or drinks but is not known to cause allergic reactions from foods or drinks.



What's next

Do I need to keep practising the Safe 6 after I’ve been vaccinated?

Yes. You will still need to wear a mask in all public indoor spaces and practise the Safe 6. Once 75% of Yukoners have been vaccinated, it will be safe to relax some of the restraints. The Chief Medical Officer of Health will help decide when we can relax safety measures.

Will I get proof I’ve been vaccinated?

When you come for your 1st dose, the clinic staff will give you your COVID-19 immunization record. Remember to bring it with you when you come for your 2nd dose. It’s your personal COVID-19 vaccine immunization record.

You can also download the CanImmunize app to keep track of this and other vaccines.

When can I get other types of vaccinations?

Unless your health-care provider says another vaccine is necessary, do not get any other vaccines, except for your 2nd COVID-19 vaccine, until:

  • you’ve received both doses; and
  • at least 1 month has passed after the second dose.

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