Information current

June 16, 2021

Practise the Safe 6 and wear a mask. For medical questions or if you feel ill phone 811, or launch the COVID-19 self-assessment tool.

For non-medical questions, contact the COVID-19 infoline: email covid19info@yukon.ca or phone 1-877-374-0425.

Chief Medical Officer of Health COVID-19 updates

Updates on COVID-19 from the Office of the Chief Medical Officer of Health

Watch the latest COVID-19 video updates.

Read transcripts from the Facebook live COVID-19 updates

Find the latest COVID-19 case counts for Yukon.


June 15, 2021 – 17:18 – 12 cases overnight; vaccination the key to prevention of further spread

Yukon’s Acting Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Catherine Elliott is issuing a strong recommendation that anyone not yet vaccinated make an appointment for their shot at the mass clinic in Whitehorse or at their health centre in rural Yukon. Her recommendation comes after 12 new cases of the COVID-19 Gamma variant (P.1) were diagnosed overnight.

10 of the cases are in Whitehorse and 2 in rural Yukon communities. Positive cases range in age from 10 to 40 years. All cases are linked to a Whitehorse contact. Only 1 individual in this most recent group was vaccinated. Of the 36 cases diagnosed since June 4, only 2 have been fully vaccinated. 3 of our earlier cases have now recovered. We currently have 33 active cases.

This outbreak involves several groups:

  • graduating Whitehorse high school students and their close contacts;
  • 2 classes at Elijah Smith Elementary School; and
  • adults who are socializing at parties and in bars.

Specific guidance has been provided by Yukon Communicable Disease Control to all student groups and parents, as well as individual positive cases.  

"The events of the past 11 days are deeply concerning, we are seeing the effects of COVID-19 in a way we have not before seen in Yukon, and we are all touched by this in one way or another. It is important now to recognise that since this pandemic began, we have worked hard together to keep ourselves and our loved ones safe. We know how to do this. Vaccine plus continued adherence to the Safe 6 plus masking is our way back to a good place.

It is now more important than ever to get vaccinated. The science shows that our best shot at protection is full vaccination. We also protect ourselves and others by practising the Safe 6 plus 1. Most people in Yukon are doing the right things. Now is also the time for us each to do our part, to be kind, to be respectful and to support each other."

Acting Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Catherine Elliott

Backgrounder 

Public exposure notices

There are no public exposure notices. However, any person who is unvaccinated and not following the Safe 6 plus 1 is considered to be at risk of contracting COVID-19 and should monitor for symptoms. Find any additional exposure notices

People with symptoms

With current active cases in Yukon, testing for COVID-19 infection is more important than ever in order to identify possible community spread. People who are vaccinated may acquire COVID-19 in rare circumstances and should seek testing if symptoms develop.

Anyone experiencing symptoms in Whitehorse should phone the COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre at 867-393-3083, or book on-line to arrange for testing.  People in communities should contact their community health centre.

Safe 6 plus 1

Everyone in Yukon should follow the Safe 6 plus 1 (plus 1 means wear a mask).

COVID-19 symptoms reminder

Anyone experiencing any of the following symptoms should self-isolate and arrange to be tested immediately:

  • fever;
  • chills;
  • cough;
  • difficulty breathing;
  • shortness of breath;
  • runny nose;
  • sore throat;
  • loss of sense of taste or smell;
  • headache;
  • fatigue;
  • loss of appetite; and
  • nausea and vomiting

June 14, 2021 – 19:23 – 3rd COVID-19 death for Yukon

Yukon’s Acting Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Catherine Elliott has confirmed a third death of a Yukon resident with COVID-19.

The Whitehorse resident was linked to a previous case and was unvaccinated.

Since Sunday, June 13, there are five new confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Yukon. Yukon’s total case count is 107.

For the new cases today:

  • Cases 105 to 107 are linked to the current outbreak.
  • Of the five cases announced today, three are in Whitehorse and two in communities:
    • One is a student at Elijah Smith Elementary School. Parents are being informed by Yukon’s Acting Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Catherine Elliot and the Department of Education.
    • Two of these cases are out of territory residents who tested positive for COVID-19 in Yukon. They are included in our active case count but not our total case count.
  • It is expected that all cases will be Gamma variant of concern.
  • All cases are self-isolating and recovering.
  • Three of our previous cases have recovered.

Public exposure notices

There are no public exposure notices however any person who is unvaccinated and not following the Safe 6 plus 1 is considered to be at risk of contracting COVID-19 and should monitor for symptoms.

People with symptoms

With current active cases in Yukon, testing for COVID-19 infection is more important than ever in order to identify possible community spread. People who are vaccinated may acquire COVID-19 in rare circumstances and should seek testing if symptoms develop.
 

Anyone experiencing symptoms in Whitehorse should call the COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre at 867-393-3083 or book on-line to arrange for testing at https://book-covid-19-test.service.yukon.ca/en/

People in communities should contact their rural community health centre.

Safe 6 plus 1

Everyone in Yukon should follow the Safe 6 plus 1 (plus 1 means wear a mask) at: practisesafe6.ca

COVID-19 symptoms reminder

Anyone experiencing any of the following symptoms should self-isolate and arrange to be tested immediately:

  • fever
  • chills
  • cough
  • difficulty breathing
  • shortness of breath
  • runny nose
  • sore throat
  • loss of sense of taste or smell
  • headache
  • fatigue
  • loss of appetite
  • nausea and vomiting
  • diarrhea
  • muscle aches

June 13, 2021 – 18:44 – Acting Chief Medical Officer of Health declares COVID-19 outbreak

Yukon’s Acting Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Catherine Elliott is declaring a COVID-19 outbreak in Whitehorse with six new cases since Friday. The Gamma variant has been identified in this outbreak. There are now 18 active cases and Yukon’s total case count is at 104.

The outbreak is linked to youth and adults who are not yet vaccinated. It includes participants at both organized and informal events linked to high school graduation, as well as adults who are socializing in close proximity such as at bars and house parties.

The outbreak includes 18 cases; 15 cases are in Whitehorse and three are in rural Yukon. There are no new public exposure notifications.

Of the six new cases:

  • all are linked to this outbreak; and
  • all are self-isolating and recovering at home.

How to protect yourself and others from spreading COVID-19

  • All contacts of a person with COVID-19 must isolate for an entire 14 days since last exposure.
  • Contacts who are fully vaccinated must isolate only if they are a household contact of a person with COVID-19. A household contact is defined as living with a case or having direct physical contact (e.g. caregiver, partner) even if not living with an individual.
  • Contact means sharing saliva, or coughing on another person, talking for 15 minutes without physical distancing and other similar types of shared activities.

*If you are given advice by Yukon Communicable Disease Control (YCDC) that is different from this, please follow their advice as the health professionals.

People with symptoms

With current active cases in Yukon, testing for COVID-19 infection is more important than ever in order to identify possible community spread. People who are vaccinated may acquire COVID-19 in rare circumstances and should seek testing if symptoms develop.

Testing turnaround times remain very quick, 36 hours in the previous week, and negative results can now be accessed online at https://service.yukon.ca/forms/en/get-covid19-test-result.

Anyone experiencing symptoms in Whitehorse should self-isolate and call the COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre at 867-393-3083 or book on-line to arrange for testing at https://book-covid-19-test.service.yukon.ca/en/

People in communities should contact their rural community health centre.

Safe 6 plus 1

Everyone in Yukon should follow the Safe 6 plus 1 (plus 1 means wear a mask) at: practisesafe6.ca

COVID-19 symptoms reminder

Anyone experiencing any of the following symptoms should self-isolate and arrange to be tested immediately.

  • fever
  • chills
  • cough
  • difficulty breathing
  • shortness of breath
  • runny nose
  • sore throat
  • loss of sense of taste or smell
  • headache
  • fatigue
  • loss of appetite
  • nausea and vomiting
  • diarrhea
  • muscle aches

"We are seeing this outbreak in groups of people who are not yet vaccinated. It is a strong reminder of how important it is to get your shots in order to protect our loved ones and our communities. We can slow the spread down by doing our part; you can book your vaccine appointment at any time. Please follow the Safe 6 + 1, maintain your social bubbles diligently and I encourage all Yukoners to continue to self-monitor for symptoms."

-Minister of Health and Social Services Tracy-Anne McPhee

"An outbreak among people who are not yet vaccinated is concerning and we are very likely to see more cases in the coming days. It is now more important than ever that people in Whitehorse follow the Safe 6 + 1, that people with symptoms isolate and get tested, and that we all get vaccinated against COVID-19.  The Gamma (P.1) variant is highly transmissible in groups who are not yet vaccinated. The vaccine is protective. Our response goal is to keep people healthy and protect those at risk of severe disease. This requires us all to follow this guidance."

-Yukon’s Acting Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Catherine Elliott


June 11, 2021 – 17:40 – Porter Creek Senior Secondary School prom ceremony cancelled

A student at Porter Creek Senior Secondary School (PCSS) is one of two new cases of COVID-19 announced today by Yukon’s Acting Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Catherine Elliott.

There are now 15 active cases in the territory.  Dr. Elliott confirms that eight of these are now confirmed as the P.1 (Gamma) variant of concern. The P1 variant is known to spread more quickly among unvaccinated individuals. Others have yet to be confirmed. Yukon’s total case count is 98.

For the new cases today:

  • The PCSS prom ceremony, scheduled for June 12, has been cancelled. The Department of Education will work with the graduation committee to reschedule the event when it safe to do so.
  • Students in the Porter Creek graduating class are advised to self-isolate, self-monitor for symptoms and seek testing if symptomatic.
  • Further direction will be provided to the school and parents about any further recommendations by Wednesday, June 16 at the latest.
  • Students involved in graduation events at all three Whitehorse high schools are encouraged to self-monitor for symptoms and get tested if symptomatic.
  • Case 97 and 98 are both Whitehorse residents, linked to previously announced cases. Both are isolating and recovering at home.

People with symptoms

With current active cases in Yukon, testing for COVID infection is more important than ever in order to identify possible community spread.  People who are vaccinated may acquire COVID-19 in rare circumstances and should seek testing if symptoms develop.

Testing turnaround times remain very quick, 24 hours in the previous week, and negative results can now be accessed online for faster access to results.

Anyone experiencing symptoms in Whitehorse should self-isolate and call the COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre at 867-393-3083 or book on-line to arrange for testing at https://book-covid-19-test.service.yukon.ca/en/

People in communities should contact their rural community health centre.

Safe 6 plus 1

Everyone in Yukon should follow the Safe 6 plus 1 (plus 1 means wear a mask) at: practisesafe6.ca

COVID-19 symptoms reminder

Anyone experiencing any of the following symptoms should self-isolate and arrange to be tested immediately:

  • fever
  • chills
  • cough
  • difficulty breathing
  • shortness of breath
  • runny nose
  • sore throat
  • loss of sense of taste or smell
  • headache
  • fatigue
  • loss of appetite
  • nausea and vomiting
  • diarrhea
  • muscle aches

More Information

Education letter to staff, parents, guardians and students
Letter from the Chief Medical Office of Health


June 10, 2021 – 17:28 – new COVID-19 cases confirmed

Yukon’s Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Brendan Hanley announces three new confirmed cases of COVID-19 and one probable case. There are now 13 active cases in the territory. Dr. Hanley confirms that 5 of these are the P.1 (Gamma) variant of concern. Yukon’s total case count is 96.

Two of the three people hospitalized have been medevaced to hospitals outside the territory.

Twelve of the 13 cases announced since Saturday, June 5, were not fully vaccinated. The one person who tested positive and was fully vaccinated is recovering with mild symptoms.

For the new cases today:

  • Two of these cases are close contacts of previous cases.
  • All are isolating and recovering at home.
  • Case investigations for all are ongoing.

Public exposure notices

There are two extensions to previous exposure notices.

  • Casa Loma Motel Bar
    • Monday, May 31, between 9 p.m. to 11 p.m.
       
  • Whisky Jack’s Pub and Grill
    • Monday, May 31, between 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.

People with symptoms

With current active cases in Yukon, testing for COVID-19 infection is more important than ever in order to identify possible community spread. People who are vaccinated may acquire COVID-19 in rare circumstances and should seek testing if symptoms develop.

Testing turnaround times remain very quick (24 hours in the previous week) and negative results can now be accessed online for faster access to results.

Anyone experiencing symptoms in Whitehorse should call the COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre at 867-393-3083 or book online to arrange for testing at https://book-covid-19-test.service.yukon.ca/en/

People in communities should contact their rural community health centre.

Safe 6 plus 1

Everyone in Yukon should follow the Safe 6 plus 1 (plus 1 means wear a mask) at: practisesafe6.ca

COVID-19 symptoms reminder

Anyone experiencing any of the following symptoms should self-isolate and arrange to be tested immediately.

  • fever
  • chills
  • cough
  • difficulty breathing
  • shortness of breath
  • runny nose
  • sore throat
  • loss of sense of taste or smell
  • headache
  • fatigue
  • loss of appetite
  • nausea and vomiting
  • diarrhea
  • muscle aches

June 9, 2021 – 17:26 – new COVID-19 cases confirmed

Yukon’s Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Brendan Hanley announces two new confirmed cases of COVID-19, one of whom was previously a probable case. There are now nine active cases in the territory. Dr. Hanley confirms that five of these are now confirmed as the P.1 (Gamma) variant of concern. Yukon’s total case count is 92.

For the new cases today:

  • Cases 88, 89 and 90 and 92 are Whitehorse residents; all are self-isolating and contact tracing is ongoing.
  • Case 91 is a community resident who is isolating and case investigation continues.

Public exposure notices

There are two new public exposure notices associated with the new cases. People may have been exposed to COVID-19 infection if they were at one of the following locations in Whitehorse:

  • Save On Foods
    • Thursday, June 3, between 2 p.m. and 3 p.m.
       
  • Bigway Foods
    • Thursday, June 3, between 3 p.m. and 3:45 p.m.

People with symptoms

With current active cases in Yukon, testing for COVID-19 infection is more important than ever in order to identify possible community spread.  People who are vaccinated may acquire COVID-19 in rare circumstances and should seek testing if symptoms develop.

Anyone experiencing symptoms in Whitehorse should call the COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre at 867-393-3083 or book online to arrange for testing at https://book-covid-19-test.service.yukon.ca/en/

People in communities should contact their rural community health centre.

Safe 6 plus 1

Everyone in Yukon should follow the Safe 6 plus 1 (plus 1 means wear a mask) at: practisesafe6.ca

COVID-19 symptoms reminder

Anyone experiencing any of the following symptoms should self-isolate and arrange to be tested immediately:

  • fever
  • chills
  • cough
  • difficulty breathing
  • shortness of breath
  • runny nose
  • sore throat
  • loss of sense of taste or smell
  • headache
  • fatigue
  • loss of appetite
  • nausea and vomiting
  • diarrhea
  • muscle aches

June 9, 2021 – 11:50 – COVID-19 update

The Government of Yukon has the following updates for the Yukon public on measures being taken in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

COVID-19 cases and recoveries

As of Wednesday, June 9, the COVID-19 case count for Yukon is 90. Eighty-two people have recovered, two people have died, and there are six active cases confirmed and two probable cases in Yukon. We have tested 7,567 people.

Self-isolation update

Effective June 18, children under 12 returning from outside the territory will not have to self-isolate for 14 days if they are with a parent or caregiver who has been fully vaccinated.

Vaccination rollout progress

As of the end of the day Tuesday, June 8, there were 54,538 doses of the Moderna vaccine administered in Yukon. This number includes 29,099 first doses and 25,439 second doses.

By region, the percentage of residents who have received a first dose is: 82 per cent in North Yukon; 85 per cent in West Yukon; 57 per cent in Central Yukon; 63 per cent in Southeast Yukon; and 81 per cent in Whitehorse.

By region, the percentage of residents who have received a second dose is: 73 per cent in North Yukon; 80 per cent in West Yukon; 51 per cent in Central Yukon; 57 per cent in Southeast Yukon; and 73 per cent in Whitehorse. Visit Yukon.ca for the latest vaccination data and progress reporting.

A clinic in Whitehorse is open for residents age 18 and older to receive their first and second doses of the vaccine by appointment or by walk-in. The clinic is open Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.; on Wednesdays it is open from 12 p.m. to 6 p.m.

Residents age 18 and older in rural Yukon can call their local clinics for an appointment or receive a vaccination in Whitehorse.

Online vaccination bookings for youth between 12 and 17 years old are open.

To book an appointment and find more information, visit https://yukon.ca/en/this-is-our-shot.

COVID-19 testing

From Wednesday, June 1, to Tuesday June 8, 51 people were tested at the COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre.

The COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre is open 8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m., Monday through Sunday. Anyone experiencing severe symptoms and requiring immediate assistance can go to the Whitehorse General Hospital Emergency Department, a community hospital or health centre.

COVID-19 test results

Yukoners who have had a COVID-19 test can now receive their negative test results online using their Yukon health care card. Possible results include “negative” or “not ready.” Anyone who tests positive for COVID-19 will be contacted promptly by Yukon Communicable Disease Control and instructed on next steps.

Enforcement statistics

The Government of Yukon has received 2,168 complaints as of June 7, 2021:

  • Failure to self-isolate: 1,223
  • Gatherings over 10 inside or 50 outside: 54
  • Failure to transit through Yukon in 24 hours or stay on their designated route: 549
  • Businesses failing to comply with orders: 26
  • Failure to abide by declaration form: 55
  • Failure to wear a mask: 207
  • Failure to physical distance: 54

In the last week, there were 6 new charges issued under CEMA; four were for failure to self-isolate, one was for failure to transit and one was for failure to behave in a manner consistent with declaration.

There have been a total of 112 charges and 93 people charged under the Civil Emergency Measures Act (CEMA).

Number of total incoming travellers: 89,350

  • Resident travellers: 23,487
  • BC residents: 17,343
  • NWT residents: 529
  • Other jurisdictions: 1,308
  • Non-residents staying: 17,607
  • Non-residents transiting: 28,977
  • Other: 99
  • Decals distributed indicating out-of-territory vehicles allowed in Yukon: 459

June 8, 2021 – 19:12 – public exposure notification

Public exposure notices are being issued for several Whitehorse locations linked to cases of COVID-19 announced earlier today.

Public exposure notification 

People may have been exposed to COVID-19 infection if they were at one of the following locations:

  • Casa Loma Motel Bar
    • Saturday, May 29, between 9 p.m. to closing
    • Monday, May 31, between 11 p.m. to closing
    • Saturday, June 5, between 8:30 p.m. to 12 a.m. (midnight)
       
  • Whiskey Jacks Pub & Grill
    • Friday, May 28, between 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.
    • Saturday, June 5, between 6:30 p.m. to 10 p.m.
       
  • Walmart
    • Sunday, June 6, between 1 p.m. to 2 p.m.
    • Sunday, June 6, between 4:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.
       
  • Canadian Tire
    • Sunday, June 6, between 1 p.m. to 2 p.m.

Anyone who was at the following locations and who is experiencing COVID-19 -like symptoms should self-isolate and remain at home, take the online self-assessment and arrange to get tested either by calling 867-393-3083 or booking a test online https://book-covid-19-test.service.yukon.ca/en/. Rural Yukon residents should contact their community health centre to arrange for testing.

Anyone experiencing COVID-19 like symptoms should self-isolate and remain at home, take the online self-assessment and arrange to get tested.

Safe 6 plus 1

Everyone should continue to follow the Safe 6 plus 1. Information about the Safe 6 is at: practisesafe6.ca. Plus 1 means wear a mask.


June 8, 2021 – 16:42 – new COVID-19 cases confirmed

Yukon’s Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Brendan Hanley announces one new confirmed and two new probable cases of COVID-19, bringing the territory’s total to 88 confirmed and two probable cases. There are currently six active cases in Yukon. Two of the people with COVID-19 are currently in the hospital.

For the new cases today:

  • all three cases were identified in Whitehorse; 
  • all are isolating;
  • contact tracing is ongoing; and 
  • sites of potential public exposure will be announced if identified.

There are no new cases at Victoria Gold. The three individuals positive for COVID-19 have now been identified as having the P.1 (Gamma) variant of concern. They remain in isolation.

People with symptoms

With current active cases in Yukon, testing for COVID-19 infection is more important than ever in order to identify possible community spread. People who are vaccinated may acquire COVID-19 in rare circumstances and should seek testing if symptoms develop.

Anyone experiencing symptoms in Whitehorse should call the COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre at 867-393-3083 or book online to arrange for testing at https://book-covid-19-test.service.yukon.ca/en/.  

People in communities should contact their rural community health centre.

Safe 6 plus 1

Everyone in Yukon should follow the Safe 6 plus 1, which means wear a mask, at: practisesafe6.ca

COVID-19 symptoms reminder

Anyone experiencing any of the following symptoms should self-isolate and arrange to be tested immediately.

  • fever
  • chills
  • cough
  • difficulty breathing
  • shortness of breath
  • runny nose
  • sore throat
  • loss of sense of taste or smell
  • headache
  • fatigue
  • loss of appetite
  • nausea and vomiting
  • diarrhea
  • muscle aches

June 5, 2021 – 18:00 – Four new COVID-19 cases confirmed; outbreak identified at mine site

Yukon’s Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Brendan Hanley confirms four new cases of COVID-19, including three new confirmed cases at the Victoria Gold Mine Site. This is the first report of cases at a mine site.

  • Case 85 is a Yukon resident who was infected, diagnosed out of territory, and will remain out of territory.
  • The other three cases are on the mine site and there are no identified public exposures at this time. Cases 86 and 87 are Yukon residents. The third case at the mine is a resident from another part of Canada.
    • These three individuals are recovering and isolating on site.
    • They were on the mine site throughout their period of infectivity.
  • Contact tracing is underway to control and prevent further spread. Additional cases may be expected.

Victoria Gold has an approved communicable disease management plan and an on-site medical team. While these cases are being confirmed by lab testing in BC, with three probable cases, Yukon’s Chief Medical Officer of Health is declaring this an outbreak.

People with symptoms

Anyone experiencing symptoms in Whitehorse should call the COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre at 867-393-3083 or book on-line to arrange for testing at https://book-covid-19-test.service.yukon.ca/en/.   

People in communities should contact their rural community health centre.

Safe 6 plus 1

Everyone in Yukon should follow the Safe 6 plus 1 at: www.practisesafe6.ca 

COVID-19 symptoms reminder

Anyone experiencing any of the following symptoms should self-isolate and arrange to be tested immediately.

  • fever
  • chills
  • cough
  • difficulty breathing
  • shortness of breath
  • runny nose
  • sore throat
  • loss of sense of taste or smell
  • headache
  • fatigue
  • loss of appetite
  • nausea and vomiting
  • diarrhea
  • muscle aches

June 2, 2021 – 11:00 – COVID-19 update

The Government of Yukon has the following updates for the Yukon public on measures being taken in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

COVID-19 cases and recoveries

As of Wednesday, June 1, the COVID-19 case count for Yukon is 84. Eighty-two people have recovered, two people have died and there are no active cases in Yukon. We have tested 7,567 people.

Vaccination rollout progress

As of the end of the day Tuesday, May 31, there were 52,913 doses of the Moderna vaccine administered in Yukon. This number includes 27,976 first doses and 24,937 second doses.

By region, the percentage of residents who have received a first dose is: 80 per cent in North Yukon; 84 per cent in West Yukon; 56 per cent in Central Yukon; 62 per cent in Southeast Yukon; and 80 per cent in Whitehorse.

By region, the percentage of residents who have received a second dose is: 71 per cent in North Yukon; 78 per cent in West Yukon; 51 per cent in Central Yukon; 57 per cent in Southeast Yukon; and 72 per cent in Whitehorse. Visit Yukon.ca for the latest vaccination data and progress reporting.

A clinic in Whitehorse is open for residents age 18 and older to receive their first and second doses of the vaccine by appointment or by walk-in. The clinic is open Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.; on Wednesdays it is open from 12 p.m. to 6 p.m.

Residents age 18 and older in rural Yukon can call their local clinics for an appointment or receive a vaccination in Whitehorse.

Online vaccination bookings for youth between 12 and 17 years old are open.

To book an appointment and find more information, visit https://yukon.ca/en/this-is-our-shot.

COVID-19 testing

From Wednesday, May 26, to Tuesday June 1, 37 people were tested at the COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre.

The COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre is open 8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m., Monday through Sunday. Anyone experiencing severe symptoms and requiring immediate assistance can go to the Whitehorse General Hospital Emergency Department, a community hospital or health centre.

COVID-19 test results

Yukoners who have had a COVID-19 test can now receive their negative test results online using their Yukon health care card. Possible results include “negative” or “not ready.” Anyone who tests positive for COVID-19 will be contacted promptly by Yukon Communicable Disease Control and instructed on next steps.

Enforcement statistics

The Government of Yukon has received 2,129 complaints as of May 31, 2021:

  • Failure to self-isolate: 1,207
  • Gatherings over 10 inside or 50 outside: 54
  • Failure to transit through Yukon in 24 hours or stay on their designated route: 535
  • Businesses failing to comply with orders: 25
  • Failure to abide by declaration form: 52
  • Failure to wear a mask: 203
  • Failure to physical distance: 53

In the last week, there were 4 new charges issued under the Civil Emergency Measures Act (CEMA). One was for failure to self-isolate; one was for failure to transit through the territory as required; one was for failure to provide a declaration; one was for failure to behave in a manner consistent with declaration.

There have been a total of 106 charges and 88 people charged under CEMA.

Number of total incoming travellers: 87,366

  • Resident travellers: 23,005
  • BC residents: 17,008
  • NWT residents: 529
  • Other jurisdictions: 1,308
  • Non-residents staying: 17,098
  • Non-residents transiting: 28,319
  • Other: 99
  • Decals distributed indicating out-of-territory vehicles allowed in Yukon: 451

May 26, 2021 – 11:00 – COVID-19 update

The Government of Yukon has the following updates for the Yukon public on measures being taken in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

COVID-19 cases and recoveries

As of Wednesday, May 26, the COVID-19 case count for Yukon is 84. Eighty-two people have recovered, two people have died and there are no active cases in Yukon. We have tested 7,469 people.

Vaccination rollout progress

As of the end of the day Tuesday, May 25, there were 52,108 doses of the Moderna vaccine administered in Yukon. This number includes 27,673 first doses and 24,435 second doses.

By region, the percentage of residents who have received a first dose is: 76 per cent in North Yukon; 83 per cent in West Yukon; 54 per cent in Central Yukon; 61 per cent in Southeast Yukon; and 78 per cent in Whitehorse.

By region, the percentage of residents who have received a second dose is: 69 per cent in North Yukon; 76 per cent in West Yukon; 48 per cent in Central Yukon; 56 per cent in Southeast Yukon; and 69 per cent in Whitehorse. Visit Yukon.ca for the latest vaccination data and progress reporting.

A clinic in Whitehorse is open for residents age 18 and older to receive their first and second doses of the vaccine by appointment or by walk-in. The clinic is open Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.; on Wednesdays it is open from 12 p.m. to 6 p.m.

Residents age 18 and older in rural Yukon can call their local clinics for an appointment or receive a vaccination in Whitehorse.

Online vaccination bookings for youth between 12 and 17 years old are open.

To book an appointment and find more information, visit https://yukon.ca/en/this-is-our-shot.

COVID-19 testing

From Wednesday, May 19, to Tuesday May 25, 26 people were tested at the COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre.

The COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre is open 8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m., Monday through Sunday. Anyone experiencing severe symptoms and requiring immediate assistance can go to the Whitehorse General Hospital Emergency Department, a community hospital or health centre.

COVID-19 test results

Yukoners who have had a COVID-19 test can now receive their negative test results online using their Yukon health care card. Possible results include “negative” or “not ready.” Anyone who tests positive for COVID-19 will be contacted promptly by Yukon Communicable Disease Control and instructed on next steps.

Enforcement statistics

The Government of Yukon has received 2,085 complaints as of May 24, 2021:

  • Failure to self-isolate: 1,187
  • Gatherings over 10 inside or 50 outside: 54
  • Failure to transit through Yukon in 24 hours or stay on their designated route: 521
  • Businesses failing to comply with orders: 25
  • Failure to abide by declaration form: 46
  • Failure to wear a mask: 200
  • Failure to physical distance: 52

In the last week, there were 3 new charges issued by CEMA officers for failure to self-isolate.

There have been a total of 102 charges and 85 people charged under the Civil Emergency Measures Act (CEMA).

Number of total incoming travellers: 85,614

  • Resident travellers: 22,538
  • BC residents: 16,633
  • NWT residents: 529
  • Other jurisdictions: 1,308
  • Non-residents staying: 16,188
  • Non-residents transiting: 28,319
  • Other: 99
  • Decals distributed indicating out-of-territory vehicles allowed in Yukon: 440

May 21,  2021 – 12:14 – Public health restrictions to be lifted on May 25

As the Yukon’s vaccine uptake continues to increase the Government of Yukon will begin lifting public health restrictions on Tuesday, May 25.

Fully vaccinated individuals will no longer need to self-isolate upon entry to the territory as of May 25.

These individuals will need to sign a declaration that they have been fully vaccinated and will also need to provide consent for the verification of their vaccination status in order to be exempt from self-isolation requirements.

If an individual does not want to consent to providing that information, they can still enter the territory as long as they self-isolate for 14 days.

Additional changes as of May 25 include:

  • bars and restaurants will be able to return to full capacity for table service;
  • social bubbles can increase to 20 individuals;
  • social gathering sizes can increase with physical distancing:
    • indoor gatherings up to 20 individuals with mask use;
    • outdoor gatherings up to 100 individuals;
  • organized indoor and outdoor gatherings and events can increase to 200 individuals with physical distancing provided the venue or space can accommodate;
  • funerals, weddings and faith-based services can increase to 200 individuals with physical distancing provided the venue or space can accommodate;
  • gyms and recreation centres can increase to 200 individuals with physical distancing provided the venue or space can accommodate; and
  • camps and recreational programs can increase to 20 individuals indoors with physical distancing and mask use and 100 individuals outdoors with physical distancing.

These changes are based on recommendations from Yukon’s Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Brendan Hanley and are guided by A Path Forward: Yukon’s plan for lifting COVID-19 restrictions.

Yukoners are still required to follow the Safe 6, plus 1, which means wearing a mask in indoor public places. To book a vaccine appointment or find more information, visit https://yukon.ca/en/this-is-our-shot.

"The territory’s vaccine uptake to date has been great to see. It means that we can safely start lifting restrictions as part of our Path Forward Plan. We are in a fortunate position because of the diligence of Yukoners and we need to keep it up.  We are leading the country when it comes to vaccinations and that work continues.  With our youth vaccine rollout starting next month, we look forward to seeing our immunization rates continue to increase. The more people get immunized, the safer our territory will be."

-Premier Sandy Silver 

"We have shown great progress with our vaccination campaign since we began administering vaccines in January. Yukon is in a good place right now and our risk levels are much lower than just a few weeks ago. I believe that based on our current risk levels, we can support the easing of some public health measures while ensuring the well-being and safety of Yukoners remains top of mind."

-Yukon’s Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Brendan Hanley 

Quick facts 

  • 14-day self-isolation is still mandatory for travelers who are not fully-vaccinated. Household hosts of these travelers must also self-isolate unless the hosts are fully vaccinated. More details are available on Yukon.ca.
  • If an individual provides consent for the verification of their vaccination status, personal health information will only be accessed by Health and Social Services staff that are authorized under the Health Information Protection and Management Act (HIPMA).
  • As of May 20, 2021, 27,381 first doses of vaccine have been provided and 24,153 second doses.
  • Social bubbles should include no more than 20 people from no more than five different households.

Read May 25, 2021, changes at a glance ‒ Path Forward ‒ next steps update.


May 19, 2021 – 11:00 – COVID-19 update

The Government of Yukon has the following updates for the Yukon public on measures being taken in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

COVID-19 cases and recoveries

As of Wednesday, May 19, the COVID-19 case count for Yukon is 84. Eighty-two people have recovered, two people have died and there are no active cases in Yukon. We have tested 7,398 people.

Vaccination rollout progress

As of the end of the day Monday, May 17, there were 50,998 doses of the Moderna vaccine administered in Yukon. This number includes 27,153 first doses and 23,845 second doses.

By region, the percentage of residents who have received a first dose is: 76 per cent in North Yukon; 83 per cent in West Yukon; 54 per cent in Central Yukon; 61 per cent in Southeast Yukon; and 78 per cent in Whitehorse.

By region, the percentage of residents who have received a second dose is: 69 per cent in North Yukon; 76 per cent in West Yukon; 48 per cent in Central Yukon; 56 per cent in Southeast Yukon; and 69 per cent in Whitehorse. Visit Yukon.ca for the latest vaccination data and progress reporting.

A clinic in Whitehorse is open for residents age 18 and older to receive their first and second doses of the vaccine by appointment or by walk-in. The clinic is open Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.; on Wednesdays it is open from 12 p.m. to 6 p.m.

Residents age 18 and older in rural Yukon can call their local clinics for an appointment or receive a vaccination in Whitehorse.

Online vaccination bookings for youth between 12 and 17 years old open Thursday, May 20.

To book an appointment and find more information, visit https://yukon.ca/en/this-is-our-shot.

COVID-19 testing

From Wednesday, May 12, to Tuesday May 18, 53 people were tested at the COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre.

The COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre is open 8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m., Monday through Sunday. Anyone experiencing severe symptoms and requiring immediate assistance can go to the Whitehorse General Hospital Emergency Department, a community hospital or health centre.

COVID-19 test results

Yukoners who have had a COVID-19 test can now receive their negative test results online using their Yukon health care card. Possible results include “negative” or “not ready.” Anyone who tests positive for COVID-19 will be contacted promptly by Yukon Communicable Disease Control and instructed on next steps.

Enforcement statistics

The Government of Yukon has received 2,031 complaints as of May 17, 2021:

  • Failure to self-isolate: 1,149
  • Gatherings over 10 inside or 50 outside: 54
  • Failure to transit through Yukon in 24 hours or stay on their designated route: 512
  • Businesses failing to comply with orders: 24
  • Failure to abide by declaration form: 43
  • Failure to wear a mask: 197
  • Failure to physical distance: 52

In the last week, there were 5 new charges issued by CEMA officers (4 were for failure to self-isolate, 1 was for failure to abide by a declaration).

There have been a total of 99 charges and 82 people charged under the Civil Emergency Measures Act (CEMA).

Number of total incoming travellers: 84,064

  • Resident travellers: 22,307
  • BC residents: 16,567
  • NWT residents: 528
  • Other jurisdictions: 1,278
  • Non-residents staying: 15,895
  • Non-residents transiting: 27,391
  • Other: 98
  • Decals distributed indicating out-of-territory vehicles allowed in Yukon: 432

May 18, 2021 – 13:45 – COVID-19 vaccination clinics for youth begin May 31

The Government of Yukon has scheduled clinics for Yukon youth age 12 to 17 to be vaccinated with the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine.

Beginning May 31, youth will be able to receive their first doses in Yukon communities. In Whitehorse, first shots will be administered starting June 1. Second dose clinics will start as early as June 23. Everyone who is eligible is encouraged to get their shot for a safe and enjoyable summer.

Clinics in communities will be held in schools. In Whitehorse, clinics will be held at the Coast High Country Inn Convention Centre.

Due to the limited supply and stricter handling requirements, the Pfizer vaccine will only be available to Yukon youth for a short time, and clinic dates will be more limited than the adult vaccine clinics.

Youth vaccine clinics for first and second doses will be held in nearly every Yukon community. Medical travel will be supported in the communities where a clinic is not held, or for youth who are unable to make the clinic date in their community.

Quick facts 

  • The dates for the youth COVID-19 clinics are listed below. Clinic times will be available shortly.
  • Youth in Atlin can get vaccinated in Whitehorse, and youth from Lower Post, Good Hope Lake and Dease River can be vaccinated in Watson Lake or Whitehorse.
  • People must wait two weeks after any other immunization before receiving their first dose of the COVID-19 vaccine. They must also wait one month after their second dose of the COVID-19 vaccine before receiving any other immunization.
  • Like Moderna, Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine is an mRNA vaccine.
  • Pfizer was initially authorized for ages 16 and up, and received additional authorization for ages 12 to 15 on May 5, 2021.
  • Moderna is available in Yukon on an ongoing basis, but is not yet approved for use in individuals under age 18.

Yukon youth COVID-19 clinic schedule (for youth age 12 to 17)

Community

First dose 1 clinic

Second dose clinic

Location

Carcross/Tagish

June 4

June 29

Ghùch Tlâ Community School

Carmacks

June 9

July 7

Tantalus School

Dawson City

June 10

July 8

Robert Service School

Faro

May 31

June 23

Del Van Gorder School

Haines Junction (includes youth from Destruction Bay, Burwash Landing and Beaver Creek)

June 2

June 28

St. Elias Community School

Mayo

June 7

July 5

J.V. Clark School

Old Crow

June 15

July 9

Chief Zheh Gittlit School

Pelly Crossing

June 8

July 6

Eliza Van Bibber School

Ross River

May 31

June 23

Ross River School

Teslin

June 11

July 13

Khàtìnas.àxh Community School

Watson Lake (includes youth from Lower Post, Good Hope Lake and Dease River)

June 1

June 24

Watson Lake Secondary School

Whitehorse (includes youth from Atlin,  Lower Post, Good Hope Lake, Dease River)

June 1 – June 18 (clinics offered Tuesday through Friday)

June 23 – July 13 (clinics offered Tuesday through Friday)

Coast High Country Inn Convention Centre


May 17, 2021 – 15:00 – Yukon surpasses 75 per cent vaccination rate

Yukon’s COVID-19 vaccination rate has now reached 76 per cent for first doses of the vaccine. As of May 17th, 26,242 eligible Yukon adults have received their first dose of the vaccine and 23,236 have had their second dose.

Vaccine uptake is increasing in every age group with rates ranging from 65 per cent for first doses in those aged 18 to 29 years, to 90 per cent in those aged 70 and over. Seventy two per cent of those aged 30 to 39 have received first doses; 75 per cent of those in the 40-to-49 year age group, 77 per cent of those aged 50 to 59 and 83 per cent of those aged 60 to 69. 73 per cent of males 18 and over, and 78 per cent of females 18 and over have received their first vaccination. Second dose percentages are lower as the second doses must be administered a minimum of 28 days following the first dose.

A clinic in Whitehorse is open for residents age 18 and older to receive their first and second doses of the vaccine by appointment or by walk-in. The clinic is open Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.; on Wednesdays it is open from 12 p.m. to 6 p.m.

Residents age 18 and older in rural communities can call their local clinics for an appointment or can receive a vaccination in Whitehorse.

Vaccination clinics for youth age 12 to 17 will begin soon, with first doses to be administered before the end of the school year. Youth vaccine clinics will be held in most communities and medical travel will be supported for those places where a youth clinic is not being held or for those who need it.

To book an appointment and find more information, visit https://yukon.ca/en/this-is-our-shot


May 12, 2021 – 11:26 – COVID-19 update

The Government of Yukon has the following updates for the Yukon public on measures being taken in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

COVID-19 cases and recoveries

As of Wednesday, May 12, the COVID-19 case count for Yukon is 84. Eighty people have recovered, two people have died and there is one active case in Yukon and one active case of a Yukoner out of the territory. We have tested 7,305 people.

Vaccination rollout progress

As of the end of the day Monday, May 10, there were 49,836 doses of the Moderna vaccine administered in Yukon. This number includes 26,583 first doses and 23,253 second doses.

By region, the percentage of residents who have received a first dose is: 76 per cent in North Yukon; 83 per cent in West Yukon; 54 per cent in Central Yukon; 60 per cent in Southeast Yukon; and 76 per cent in Whitehorse.

By region, the percentage of residents who have received a second dose is: 68 per cent in North Yukon; 83 per cent in West Yukon; 47 per cent in Central Yukon; 55 per cent in Southeast Yukon; and 67 per cent in Whitehorse. Visit Yukon.ca for the latest vaccination data and progress reporting.

A clinic in Whitehorse is open for residents age 18 and older to receive their first and second doses of the vaccine by appointment or by walk-in. The clinic is open Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.; on Wednesdays it is open from 12 p.m. to 6 p.m.

The third round of mobile vaccination tours to Yukon communities is complete. Residents age 18 and older can call their local clinics for an appointment or can receive a vaccination in Whitehorse.

To book an appointment and find more information, visit https://yukon.ca/en/this-is-our-shot.

COVID-19 testing

From Wednesday, May 5, to Tuesday May 11, 57 people were tested at the COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre.

The COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre is open 8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m., Monday through Sunday. Anyone experiencing severe symptoms and requiring immediate assistance can go to the Whitehorse General Hospital Emergency Department, a community hospital or health centre.

COVID-19 test results

Yukoners who have had a COVID-19 test can now receive their negative test results online using their Yukon health care card at https://service.yukon.ca/forms/en/get-covid19-test-result. Possible results include “negative” or “not ready.” Anyone who tests positive for COVID-19 will be contacted promptly by Yukon Communicable Disease Control and instructed on next steps.

Enforcement statistics

The Government of Yukon has received 1,966 complaints as of May 10, 2021:

  • Failure to self-isolate: 1,110
  • Gatherings over 10 inside or 50 outside: 51
  • Failure to transit through Yukon in 24 hours or stay on their designated route: 500
  • Businesses failing to comply with orders: 23
  • Failure to abide by declaration form: 42
  • Failure to wear a mask: 188
  • Failure to physical distance: 52

In the last week, there were 7 new charges issued under the Civil Emergency Measures Act (CEMA). Four were for failure to self-isolate, two were for failure to wear a mask, and one was for belligerent behaviour.

There have been a total of 94 charges and 77 people charged under the CEMA.

Number of total incoming travellers: 82,883

  • Resident travellers: 22,112
  • BC residents: 16,515
  • NWT residents: 526
  • Other jurisdictions: 1,270
  • Non-residents staying: 15,657
  • Non-residents transiting: 26,705
  • Other: 98
  • Decals distributed indicating out-of-territory vehicles allowed in Yukon: 387

May 12, 2021 – 11:17 – Vaccine statistics released for all Yukon communities

With 74 per cent of all eligible Yukoners having had their first dose of the COVID-19 vaccine, and the third round of mobile immunization clinics in all rural communities completed, the Government of Yukon has released current vaccination rates for all Yukon communities. Uptake is expected to continue to increase and updated rates will be released monthly.

A clinic in Whitehorse is open for residents age 18 and older to receive their first and second doses of the vaccine by appointment or by walk-in. The clinic is open Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.; on Wednesdays it is open from 12 p.m. to 6 p.m.

The third round of mobile vaccination tours to Yukon communities is complete. Residents age 18 and older can call their local clinics for an appointment or can receive a vaccination in Whitehorse.

To book an appointment and find more information, visit https://yukon.ca/en/this-is-our-shot.

"We are in a very good place with our vaccination uptake right now as 74 per cent of eligible Yukoners have had their first dose and 66 per cent have had their second dose. We continue to see people come forward every week, both in Whitehorse and from our communities. While we expect numbers to continue to increase slowly, we continue to urge all Yukoners to take advantage of our vaccine opportunities to keep us all safe."

-Minister of Health and Social Services Tracy-Anne McPhee

"I am very pleased with how Yukoners have come forward to get vaccinated. At the same time, we know that vaccine hesitancy is real, and takes time to understand and address. We have been working with leaders and communities one on one, and this daily engagement is helping to slowly move those numbers up. Overall, we are doing exceptionally well."

-Yukon’s Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Brendan Hanley

Quick facts 

  • A total of 74 per cent of eligible Yukoners over the age of 18 have received their first dose; 66 per cent over the age of 18 are fully vaccinated with two doses.
  • Vaccine is still available through the clinic in Whitehorse Tuesday through Friday. In rural communities, residents are asked to contact their local health centre to schedule their shot.
  • A total of 76 per cent of eligible females have been vaccinated and 71 per cent of eligible males have been vaccinated.

COVID-19 Vaccine Uptake

May 1, 2021

Table 1. Comparison of Immunized Population Figures: Eligible Population Compared and Total Population

 

% Immunized

Total % of Eligible Population Vaccinated (18 +) with Dose 2

65%

Total % of Total Yukon Population Vaccinated (All Yukoners) with Dose 2

53%

 

 

 

 

 

Table 2. Proportion of population vaccinated with Dose 1 of COVID-19 vaccine between January 1 and May 1, 2021

 

18-29

30-39

40-49

50-59

60-69

70+

Grand Total (eligible 18+)

Grand Total (total population)

Beaver Creek

36%

52%

56%

67%

77%

88%

58%

49%

Carcross / Tagish

40%

46%

38%

69%

78%

76%

62%

54%

Carmacks /Braeburn

62%

54%

68%

61%

76%

57%

63%

48%

Dawson City

60%

74%

62%

71%

79%

76%

70%

58%

DBay / Burwash

59%

50%

58%

77%

77%

56%

64%

54%

Faro

43%

54%

60%

72%

72%

69%

64%

51%

Haines Junction/Champagne

73%

85%

89%

84%

96%

96%

88%

71%

Mayo/Keno/Stewart Crossing

63%

68%

81%

73%

99%

87%

79%

67%

Old Crow

43%

76%

88%

88%

79%

110%

76%

59%

Pelly Crossing

42%

42%

42%

71%

59%

52%

50%

39%

Ross River

18%

28%

31%

42%

43%

44%

33%

26%

Teslin/Johnson’s Crossing

53%

62%

68%

74%

66%

97%

70%

58%

Watson Lake

42%

50%

53%

60%

58%

71%

55%

45%

Whitehorse

62%

71%

76%

77%

85%

95%

76%

61%

Yukon Communities excluding Whitehorse

51%

62%

61%

69%

76%

78%

66%

54%

All Yukon

60%

69%

73%

75%

83%

90%

74%

59%

Table 3. Proportion of population vaccinated with Dose 2 of COVID-19 vaccine between January 1 and May 1, 2021

 

18-29

30-39

40-49

50-59

60-69

70+

Grand Total (eligible 18+)

Grand Total (total population)

Beaver Creek

36%

48%

56%

61%

69%

88%

55%

47%

Carcross / Tagish

32%

32%

37%

66%

74%

71%

56%

49%

Carmacks / Braeburn

49%

46%

60%

53%

69%

53%

55%

42%

Dawson City

52%

68%

58%

66%

73%

70%

64%

53%

Destruction Bay / Burwash Landing

41%

50%

52%

73%

65%

56%

57%

49%

Faro

32%

46%

54%

67%

71%

67%

59%

47%

Haines Junction / Champagne

62%

71%

83%

78%

93%

95%

81%

66%

Mayo / Keno / Stewart Crossing

56%

56%

70%

62%

94%

85%

71%

60%

Old Crow

23%

67%

71%

76%

76%

105%

65%

51%

Pelly Crossing

27%

36%

32%

60%

59%

52%

43%

33%

Ross River

12%

25%

25%

38%

35%

40%

28%

22%

Teslin / Johnson's Crossing / Swift River

44%

55%

64%

70%

62%

97%

65%

54%

Watson Lake

36%

44%

45%

57%

56%

69%

51%

42%

Yukon Communities excluding Whitehorse

42%

55%

55%

64%

71%

75%

60%

49%

Whitehorse

49%

60%

67%

69%

79%

91%

67%

53%

All Yukon

48%

60%

65%

68%

77%

87%

65%

53%

 


May 12, 2021 – 10:53 – COVID-19 vaccinations to be available for Yukon youth

The Government of Yukon is working to protect Yukon youth from COVID-19. A supply of the Pfizer vaccine has been arranged for the territory and will allow Yukoners aged 12 to 17 to be vaccinated in the coming weeks.

Vaccination clinics for youth are expected to begin soon. Youth vaccine clinics will be held in most communities and medical travel will be supported for those places where a youth clinic is not held.

"Our youth have made incredible contributions to keep our communities safe over the course of this pandemic. We are excited we are now able to offer vaccines for our youth. Getting vaccinated is the best thing you can do to protect you, your family, your community and your future."

-Minister of Health and Social Services Tracy-Anne McPhee

"As we have seen elsewhere, new variants are affecting young people more than before. COVID-19 can also result in long-term effects, even in young and otherwise healthy people. Vaccinating our young people will help keep them safe while helping to protect our whole community. I urge all youth and parents to take advantage of this opportunity to get vaccinated."

-Yukon’s Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Brendan Hanley


May 11, 2021 – 15:00 – new COVID-19 cases confirmed

Yukon’s Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Brendan Hanley confirms two new cases of COVID-19, bringing the territory’s total to 84 cases. There is currently one active case in Yukon.

  • Case 83 is an adult in Whitehorse and is related to international travel.
    • There were no public exposures.
    • The individual is isolating in a safe and effective manner.
  • Case 84 is a Yukon resident who acquired the infection out of the territory, was tested out of the territory and will remain out of Yukon until non-infectious.
    • This individual is included in the Yukon count but does not increase the number of active cases in the territory.

People with symptoms

Anyone experiencing symptoms in Whitehorse should call the COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre at 867-393-3083 or book on-line to arrange for testing at https://book-covid-19-test.service.yukon.ca/en/.  

People in communities should contact their rural community health centre.

Safe 6 plus 1

Everyone in Yukon should follow the Safe 6 plus 1 at: practisesafe6.ca

COVID-19 symptoms reminder

Anyone experiencing any of the following symptoms should self-isolate and arrange to be tested immediately.

  • fever
  • chills
  • cough
  • difficulty breathing
  • shortness of breath
  • runny nose
  • sore throat
  • loss of sense of taste or smell
  • headache
  • fatigue
  • loss of appetite
  • nausea and vomiting
  • diarrhea
  • muscle aches

May 6, 2021 – 15:45 – Dr. Theresa Tam and Dr. Brendan Hanley host a live question and answer event for Yukoners

On Saturday, May 8, at 10 a.m., Yukoners are invited to tune in and ask questions to Canada’s Chief Public Officer of Health Dr. Theresa Tam and Yukon’s Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Brendan Hanley during a live question and answer event moderated by Gurdeep Pandher. Register to watch the live event here: https://ca01web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_L8WcR6kzRDe8SCnPrn_MzA  

Yukoners can submit their questions by sending a message to the Health and Social Services Facebook page or sending an email to hss@yukon.ca. Yukoners tuning into the live event will have an opportunity to ask both medical professionals a question by using the chat feature.  


May 5, 2021 – 11:58 – COVID-19 update 

The Government of Yukon has the following updates for the Yukon public on measures being taken in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

COVID-19 cases and recoveries

As of Wednesday, May 5, the COVID-19 case count for Yukon is 82. Seventy-nine people have recovered, two people have died and there is one active case. We have tested 7,228 people.

Vaccination rollout progress

As of the end of the day Monday, May 3, there were 48,655 doses of the Moderna vaccine administered in Yukon. This number includes 25,998 first doses and 22,657 second doses.

By region, the percentage of residents who have received a first dose is: 73 per cent in North Yukon; 82 per cent in West Yukon; 54 per cent in Central Yukon; 60 per cent in Southeast Yukon; and 76 per cent in Whitehorse.

By region, the percentage of residents who have received a second dose is: 66 per cent in North Yukon; 75 per cent in West Yukon; 47 per cent in Central Yukon; 55 per cent in Southeast Yukon; and 67 per cent in Whitehorse. Visit Yukon.ca for the latest vaccination data and progress reporting.

A clinic in Whitehorse is open for residents age 18 and older to receive their first and second doses of the vaccine by appointment or by walk-in. The clinic is open Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.; on Wednesdays it is open from 12 p.m. to 6 p.m.

The third round of mobile vaccination tours to Yukon communities is complete. Residents age 18 and older can call their local clinics for an appointment or can receive a vaccination in Whitehorse.

To book an appointment and find more information, visit https://yukon.ca/en/this-is-our-shot.

COVID-19 testing

From Wednesday, April 28, to Tuesday May 4, 65 people were tested at the COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre.

The COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre is open 8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m., Monday through Sunday. Anyone experiencing severe symptoms and requiring immediate assistance can go to the Whitehorse General Hospital Emergency Department, a community hospital or health centre.

Enforcement statistics

The Government of Yukon has received 1,911 complaints as of May 3, 2021:

  • Failure to self-isolate: 1,077
  • Gatherings over 10 inside or 50 outside: 48
  • Failure to transit through Yukon in 24 hours or stay on their designated route: 492
  • Businesses failing to comply with orders: 23
  • Failure to abide by declaration form: 42
  • Failure to wear a mask: 177
  • Failure to physical distance: 52

In the last week, there were 7 new charges issued under the Civil Emergency Measures Act (CEMA).

Four charges were for failure to self-isolate as required: two were for failure to provide a declaration and one was for failure to transit through the territory as required.

There have been a total of 87 charges and 70 people charged under (CEMA).

Number of total incoming travellers: 81,120

  • Resident travellers: 21,699
  • BC residents: 16,425
  • NWT residents: 525
  • Other jurisdictions: 1,257
  • Non-residents staying: 15,246
  • Non-residents transiting: 25,753
  • Other: 215
  • Decals distributed indicating out-of-territory vehicles allowed in Yukon: 387

May 3, 2021 – 16:15 – New COVID-19 case confirmed 

Yukon’s Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Brendan Hanley confirms one new case of COVID-19, bringing the territory’s total to 82 cases. There is currently one active case in Yukon.

  • Case 82 is in Whitehorse and is travel-related, linked to an outbreak in another jurisdiction and is positive for B.1.1.7.
  • There were no public exposures.
  • The individual is recovering at home.

People with symptoms

Anyone experiencing symptoms in Whitehorse should call the COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre at 867-393-3083 or book online to arrange for testing.    

People in communities should contact their rural community health centre.

Safe 6 plus 1

Everyone in Yukon should follow the Safe 6 plus 1.

COVID-19 symptoms reminder

Anyone experiencing any of the following symptoms should self-isolate and arrange to be tested immediately.

  • fever
  • chills
  • cough
  • difficulty breathing
  • shortness of breath
  • runny nose
  • sore throat
  • loss of sense of taste or smell
  • headache
  • fatigue
  • loss of appetite
  • nausea and vomiting
  • diarrhea
  • muscle aches

April 28, 2021 – 11:20 – COVID-19 update

The Government of Yukon has the following updates for the Yukon public on measures being taken in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

COVID-19 cases and recoveries

As of Wednesday, April 28, the COVID-19 case count for Yukon is 81. Seventy-nine people have recovered, two people have died and there are no active cases. We have tested 7,134 people.

Vaccination rollout progress

As of the end of the day Tuesday, April 27, there were 47,763 doses of the Moderna vaccine administered in Yukon. This number includes 25,731 first doses and 22,032 second doses.

By region, the percentage of residents who have received a first dose is: 72 per cent in North Yukon; 81 per cent in West Yukon; 54 per cent in Central Yukon; 60 per cent in Southeast Yukon; and 74 per cent in Whitehorse.

By region, the percentage of residents who have received a second dose is: 66 per cent in North Yukon; 75 per cent in West Yukon; 47 per cent in Central Yukon; 54 per cent in Southeast Yukon; and 64 per cent in Whitehorse. Visit Yukon.ca for the latest vaccination data and progress reporting.

A clinic in Whitehorse is open for residents age 18 and older to receive their first and second doses of the vaccine by appointment or by walk-in. As of May 1, the vaccine clinic will see new hours of operation: Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays it will be open from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.; on Wednesdays it will be open from 12 p.m. to 6 p.m.

The third round of mobile vaccination tours to Yukon communities is complete. Residents age 18 and older can call their local clinics for an appointment or can receive a vaccination in Whitehorse.

Book an appointment and find more information.

COVID-19 testing

From Wednesday, April 21, to Tuesday April 27, 61 people were tested at the COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre.

The COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre is open 8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m., Monday through Sunday. Anyone experiencing severe symptoms and requiring immediate assistance can go to the Whitehorse General Hospital Emergency Department, a community hospital or health centre.

Enforcement statistics

The Government of Yukon has received 1,842 complaints as of April 27:

  • Failure to self-isolate: 1,039
  • Gatherings over 10 inside or 50 outside: 48
  • Failure to transit through Yukon in 24 hours or stay on their designated route: 475
  • Businesses failing to comply with orders: 23
  • Failure to abide by declaration form: 42
  • Failure to wear a mask: 165
  • Failure to physical distance: 50

There have been three new charges since April 20, issued by CEMA officers (failure to self-isolate x3).

There have been a total of 80 charges and 64 people charged under the Civil Emergency Measures Act (CEMA).

Number of total incoming travellers: 79,313

  • Resident travellers: 21,360
  • BC residents: 16,362
  • NWT residents: 523
  • Other jurisdictions: 1215
  • Non-residents staying: 14,842
  • Non-residents transiting: 24,914
  • Other: 97
  • Decals distributed indicating out-of-territory vehicles allowed in Yukon: 384

April 26, 2021 – 16:15 – COVID-19 associated death in new case

Yukon’s Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Brendan Hanley has confirmed a second death of a Yukon resident with COVID-19.

The person had unrelated health conditions that caused their death. The person contracted COVID 19 near the time of death and is therefore considered a COVID-associated death. This person will be counted as case 81.


April 22, 2021 – 16:41 – two new COVID-19 cases confirmed

Yukon’s Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Brendan Hanley confirms two new cases of COVID-19 in Yukon.

Case 79 and case 80, both adults in Whitehorse, are in the same household. The source of infection is currently under investigation. 

Health status

Self-isolating and recovering at home. Contact tracing is ongoing.

Public exposure notification 

People may have been exposed to COVID-19 infection if they were at the following location:

Saturday, April 10, 2021

Wykes’ Your Independent Grocer, Whitehorse

  • Between 12:30 p.m. and 3:30 p.m.

Anyone who was at this location and has symptoms of COVID-19 should get tested, take the online self-assessment and arrange to get tested either by calling 867-393-3083 or booking a test online. Rural Yukon residents should contact their community health centre to arrange for testing.

Anyone who is experiencing any of the following symptoms is asked to self-isolate and arrange for testing immediately:

  • fever
  • chills
  • cough
  • difficulty breathing
  • shortness of breath
  • runny nose
  • sore throat
  • loss of sense of taste or smell
  • headache
  • fatigue
  • loss of appetite
  • nausea and vomiting
  • diarrhea
  • muscle aches

Safe 6 plus 1

Everyone should continue to follow the Safe 6 plus 1. The plus 1 means wear a mask in all indoor public places. Find information about the Safe 6.


April 21 – 17:09 – COVID-19 case update

One new case of COVID-19 reported for Yukon.

  • Case 78 is an adult, associated with international travel.
  • Tested positive upon return to Canada and has completed self-isolation prior to returning to Yukon.
  • Is now recovered so will not be included in active case count.
  • There were no exposures in Yukon as case was not infectious in territory.

Safe 6 plus 1

Everyone should continue to follow the Safe 6 plus 1. Information about the Safe 6 is at: practisesafe6.ca


April 21 – 11:18 – COVID-19 update

The Government of Yukon has the following updates for the Yukon public on measures being taken in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

COVID-19 cases and recoveries

As of Tuesday, April 20, the COVID-19 case count for Yukon is 77. Seventy-four people have recovered, one person has died and there are two active cases. We have tested 7,062 people.

Vaccination rollout progress

As of the end of the day Tuesday, April 20, there were 45,971 doses of the Moderna vaccine administered in Yukon. This number includes 25,216 first doses and 20,755 second doses.

By region, the percentage of residents who have received a first dose is: 72 per cent in North Yukon; 81 per cent in West Yukon; 54 per cent in Central Yukon; 59 per cent in Southeast Yukon; and 72 per cent in Whitehorse.

By region, the percentage of residents who have received a second dose is: 66 per cent in North Yukon; 74 per cent in West Yukon; 47 per cent in Central Yukon; 53 per cent in Southeast Yukon; and 59 per cent in Whitehorse. Visit Yukon.ca for the latest vaccination data and progress reporting.

A clinic in Whitehorse is open for residents age 18 and older to receive their first and second doses of the vaccine by appointment or by walk-in.

The third round of mobile vaccination tours to Yukon communities is complete. Residents age 18 and older can call their local health centre for an appointment or can receive a vaccination in Whitehorse.

Book an appointment and find more information.

COVID-19 testing

From Wednesday, April 14, to Tuesday April 20, 43 people were tested at the COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre.

The COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre is open 8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m., Monday through Sunday. Anyone experiencing severe symptoms and requiring immediate assistance can go to the Whitehorse General Hospital Emergency Department, a community hospital or health centre.

Long term care changes

Long term care homes are engaging with residents and families to develop a plan for safe community outings and an increased number of visitors for residents at the homes. The goal is to implement these changes the week of May 3.

Testing for returning students and seasonal workers

Vaccinations will be made available to all returning students and seasonal workers who are arriving in Yukon and wish to be immunized while in self-isolation. Students and seasonal workers between the ages of 18-29 will be granted permission to leave self-isolation to receive their vaccination. Tourists or visitors to the territory who cannot show proof of residency or employment will not be eligible to take part in this program.

Individuals will be required to book a COVID-19 test before being vaccinated. Individuals can expect to have their results within 15 minutes. If your test is negative, staff at the testing centre will book a same-day vaccine appointment for you. Proof of a same-day negative COVID-19 test must be presented at the vaccination clinic. Visit Yukon.ca for more details.

Enforcement statistics

The Government of Yukon has received 1,782 complaints as of April 20:

  • Failure to self-isolate: 1,009
  • Gatherings over 10 inside or 50 outside: 46
  • Failure to transit through Yukon in 24 hours or stay on their designated route: 459
  • Businesses failing to comply with orders: 20
  • Failure to abide by declaration form: 41
  • Failure to wear a mask: 160
  • Failure to physical distance: 47

There have been four new charges since April 13, issued by CEMA officers (two Failure to Self-Isolate charges and two Failure to Provide Declaration charges).

There have been a total of 77 charges and 61 people charged under the Civil Emergency Measures Act (CEMA).

Number of total incoming travellers: 78,409

  • Resident travellers: 21,135
  • BC residents: 16,321
  • NWT residents: 520
  • Other approved jurisdictions: 1,198
  • Non-residents staying: 14,683
  • Non-residents transiting: 24,455
  • Other: 97
  • Decals distributed indicating out-of-territory vehicles allowed in Yukon: 384

April 19 – 16:49 – one new COVID-19 case confirmed

Yukon’s Chief Medial Officer of Health Dr. Brendan Hanley confirms one new case of COVID-19 in Yukon.

Case 77 is an adult in rural Yukon, associated with travel within Canada.

Health status

Self-isolating and recovering at home. Contact tracing is ongoing.

Public exposure notification 

Friday, April 9, 2021, Watson Lake

People may have been exposed to COVID-19 infection if they were at the following location:

  • Andrea’s Restaurant, Alaska Hwy Truckers Pub and Grill
  • Breakfast sitting 6 a.m. to 11 a.m.

Anyone who was at this location and has symptoms of COVID-19 should get tested, take the online self-assessment and arrange to get tested either by calling 867-393-3083 or booking a test online. Rural Yukon residents should contact their community health centre to arrange for testing.

Anyone who is experiencing any of the following symptoms is asked to self-isolate and arrange for testing immediately:

  • fever
  • chills
  • cough
  • difficulty breathing
  • shortness of breath
  • runny nose
  • sore throat
  • loss of sense of taste or smell
  • headache
  • fatigue
  • loss of appetite
  • nausea and vomiting
  • diarrhea
  • muscle aches

Safe 6 plus 1

Everyone should continue to follow the Safe 6 plus 1. Information about the Safe 6 is at: practisesafe6.ca


April 14 – 15:00 – COVID-19 update

The Government of Yukon has the following updates for the Yukon public on measures being taken in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

COVID-19 cases and recoveries

As of Wednesday, April 14, the COVID-19 case count for Yukon is 76. Seventy-three people have recovered, one person has died and there are two active cases. We have tested 6,985 people.

Vaccination rollout progress

As of the end of the day Monday, April 12, there were 42,354 doses of the Moderna vaccine administered in Yukon. This number includes 24,701 first doses and 17,653 second doses.

By region, the percentage of residents who have received a first dose is: 72 per cent in North Yukon; 78 per cent in West Yukon; 53 per cent in Central Yukon; 59 per cent in Southeast Yukon; and 71 per cent in Whitehorse.

By region, the percentage of residents who have received a second dose is: 65 per cent in North Yukon; 70 per cent in West Yukon; 46 per cent in Central Yukon; 53 per cent in Southeast Yukon; and 46 per cent in Whitehorse. Visit Yukon.ca for the latest vaccination data and progress reporting.

A clinic in Whitehorse is open for residents age 18 and older to receive their first and second doses of the vaccine by appointment or by walk-in.

Mobile vaccination teams continue to visit Yukon communities. Residents age 18 and older will have the opportunity to receive their first or second shot during the next visit of the mobile team to their community. Everyone receiving a first shot is guaranteed a second shot within the designated time period.

Book an appointment and find more information.

COVID-19 testing

From Wednesday, April 7, to Tuesday April 13, 42 people were tested at the COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre.

The COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre is open 8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m., Monday through Sunday. Anyone experiencing severe symptoms and requiring immediate assistance can go to the Whitehorse General Hospital Emergency Department, a community hospital or health centre.

Enforcement statistics

The Government of Yukon has received 1,731 complaints as of April 13:

  • Failure to self-isolate: 980
  • Gatherings over 10 inside or 50 outside: 45
  • Failure to transit through Yukon in 24 hours or stay on their designated route: 454
  • Businesses failing to comply with orders: 19
  • Failure to abide by declaration form: 38
  • Failure to wear a mask: 151
  • Failure to physical distance: 44

There have been two new charges since April 6, issued by CEMA officers (both were for failure to wear a mask).

There have been a total of 73 charges and 58 people charged under the Civil Emergency Measures Act (CEMA).

Number of total incoming travellers: 77,170

  • Resident travellers: 20,801
  • BC residents: 16,233
  • NWT residents: 517
  • Other approved jurisdictions: 1151
  • Non-residents staying: 14,357
  • Non-residents transiting: 24,014
  • Other: 97
  • Decals distributed indicating out-of-territory vehicles allowed in Yukon: 384

April 13, 2021 – 17:09 – public exposure notification

Yukon’s Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Brendan Hanley has issued a potential exposure notification for three locations in Whitehorse related to yesterday’s case announcement. These notifications are issued as a precaution. This does not mean that a business failed to follow the COVID-19 health guidelines.

Public exposure notification 

All locations are for Friday, April 9, 2021

Canada Post and Shoppers Drug Mart in Qwanlin Mall

3 p.m. to 4 p.m.

Superstore

5 p.m. to 6 p.m.

Walmart

5:45 p.m. to 6:15 p.m.

Anyone experiencing COVID-19 like symptoms should self-isolate and remain at home, take the online self-assessment and arrange to get tested either by calling 867-393-3083 or booking a test online

Rural Yukon residents should contact their community health centre to arrange for testing.

Safe 6 plus 1

Everyone should continue to follow the Safe 6 plus 1.


April 12 – 21:24 – one new COVID-19 case confirmed

Yukon’s Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Brendan Hanley confirms one new case of COVID-19 in Yukon.

  • Case 75 is a Whitehorse resident and is linked to the previously announced case involving an out of territory resident who travelled to Yukon.

Health status: Self-isolating at home. Contact tracing is ongoing.   

Public exposure notification

Yukon’s Chief Medical Officer of Health has expanded the public notification for passengers who were on the following flight, due to receiving further information related to the previous notification:

  • Saturday, April 3, 2021
    • Air North flight 4N538
    • Vancouver to Whitehorse
    • Departure 1:35 p.m., arrival 3:59 p.m.

Anyone who was on this flight and has symptoms of COVID-19 should get tested. People who were on the flight and do not have symptoms can also get tested. Everyone on the flight should continue to follow their self-isolation plan for entering Yukon. However, they’re allowed to leave self-isolation for testing but should resume isolating after they have been tested. 

In addition, anyone who was in the Erik Nielsen Whitehorse International Airport terminal between 4 and 5 p.m. on Saturday, April 3, should self-monitor and get tested if they develop symptoms.

In addition, anyone who was in the Erik Nielsen Whitehorse International Airport terminal between 4 and 5 p.m. on Saturday, April 3, should self-monitor and get tested if they develop symptoms.

Anyone experiencing COVID-19-like symptoms should self-isolate and remain at home, take the online self-assessment and arrange to get tested either by calling 867-393-3083 or booking a test online

Safe 6 plus 1

Everyone in Yukon should continue to follow the Safe 6 plus 1. Plus 1 means wear a mask in all indoor public spaces. Information about the Safe 6 is at: practisesafe6.ca


April 11 – 19:11 – COVID-19 public exposure notification

Yukon’s Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Brendan Hanley has issued a potential exposure notification for the 1:35 p.m. Air North flight from Vancouver to Whitehorse on Saturday, April 3.

A person from out of territory has tested positive several days after arriving in Yukon. The person is self-isolating and recovering. In addition to this public notification, contact tracing with passengers seated in close proximity to the case is underway. We are confident that all standard protocols were adhered to. Although the risk of exposure is low on flights, we are taking a precautionary approach. Contact tracing for the case is underway, and to date, no other exposures of concern have been identified in Yukon.

Public exposure notification 

People may have been exposed to COVID-19 infection if they were on the following flight:

  • Saturday, April 3, 2021
    • Air North flight 4N538
    • Vancouver to Whitehorse
    • Departure 1:35 p.m., arrival 3:59 p.m.

Anyone experiencing COVID-19 like symptoms should self-isolate and remain at home, take the online self-assessment and arrange to get tested either by calling 867-393-3083 or booking a test online.

Safe 6 plus 1

Everyone in Yukon should continue to follow the Safe 6 plus 1. Information about the Safe 6 is at: practisesafe6.ca


April 9 – 17:52 – public exposure notification

Please note the flight date has been updated to Sunday, April 4.

Yukon’s Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Brendan Hanley has issued a potential exposure notification for the 6:30 p.m. flight from Vancouver to Whitehorse on Sunday, April 4.

New information has become available regarding a previous case. This person was infected with the variant B.1.1.7 while outside Yukon. They had originally been cleared to travel but based on new information it was determined they were infectious while on the flight. In addition to this public notification, contact tracing with passengers seated in close proximity to the case is underway. Although the risk of exposure is low on flights, we are taking a precautionary approach. No other exposures of concern have been identified in Yukon.

This person followed all public health advice and is now determined to be recovered. There remain no active cases of COVID-19 in Yukon.  

Public exposure notification 

People may have been exposed to COVID-19 infection if they were on the following flight:

  • Sunday, April 4, 2021
    • Air Canada 8889
    • Vancouver to Whitehorse
    • Departure 6:30 p.m., arrival 8:49 p.m.

Anyone experiencing COVID-19 like symptoms should self-isolate and remain at home, take the online self-assessment and arrange to get tested either by calling 867-393-3083 or booking a test online.

Safe 6 plus 1

Everyone should continue to follow the Safe 6 plus 1. Plus 1 means wear a mask in all indoor public spaces. Information about the Safe 6 is at: practisesafe6.ca


April 7 – 11:05 – COVID-19 update

The Government of Yukon has the following updates for the Yukon public on measures being taken in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

COVID-19 cases and recoveries

As of Tuesday, April 6, the COVID-19 case count for Yukon is 74. Seventy-three people have recovered, one person has died and there are no active cases. We have tested 6,933 people.

Vaccination rollout progress

As of the end of the day Monday, April 5, there were 37,193 doses of the Moderna vaccine administered in Yukon. This number includes 23,954 first doses and 13,239 second doses.

By region, the percentage of residents who have received a first dose is: 70 per cent in North Yukon; 79 per cent in West Yukon; 52 per cent in Central Yukon; 59 per cent in Southeast Yukon; and 70 per cent in Whitehorse.

By region, the percentage of residents who have received a second dose is: 60 per cent in North Yukon; 70 per cent in West Yukon; 41 per cent in Central Yukon; 53 per cent in Southeast Yukon; and 30 per cent in Whitehorse. Visit Yukon.ca for the latest vaccination data and progress reporting.

A clinic in Whitehorse is open for residents age 18 and older to receive their first and second doses of the vaccine by appointment or by walk-in.

Mobile vaccination teams continue to visit Yukon communities. Residents age 18 and older will have the opportunity to receive their first or second shot during the next visit of the mobile team to their community. Everyone receiving a first shot is guaranteed a second shot within the designated time period.

Book an appointment and find more information.

COVID-19 testing

From Wednesday, March 31, to Tuesday April 6, 20 people were tested at the COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre.

The COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre is open 8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m., Monday through Sunday. Anyone experiencing severe symptoms and requiring immediate assistance can go to the Whitehorse General Hospital Emergency Department, a community hospital or health centre.

Enforcement statistics

The Government of Yukon has received 1,684 complaints as of April 6:

  • Failure to self-isolate: 954
  • Gatherings over 10 inside or 50 outside: 44
  • Failure to transit through Yukon in 24 hours or stay on their designated route: 449
  • Businesses failing to comply with orders: 15
  • Failure to abide by declaration form: 35
  • Failure to wear a mask: 146
  • Failure to physical distance: 41

There has been one new charge since March 30issued by CEMA officers (failure to wear a mask).

There have been a total of 71 charges and 56 people charged under the Civil Emergency Measures Act (CEMA).

Number of total incoming travellers: 76,122

  • Resident travellers: 20,477
  • BC residents: 16,181
  • NWT residents: 513
  • Other approved jurisdictions: 1122
  • Non-residents staying: 14,098
  • Non-residents transiting: 23,634
  • Other: 97
  • Decals distributed indicating out-of-territory vehicles allowed in Yukon: 384

March 31 – 11:05 – COVID-19 update

The Government of Yukon has the following updates for the Yukon public on measures being taken in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

COVID-19 cases and recoveries

As of Tuesday, March 30, the COVID-19 case count for Yukon is 73. Seventy-one people have recovered, one person has died and there is one active case. We have tested 6,880 people.

Vaccination rollout progress

As of end of day Monday, March 29, there were 34,828 doses of the Moderna vaccine administered in Yukon. This number includes 23,674 first doses and 11,154 second doses.

By region, the percentage of residents who have received a first dose is: 69 per cent in North Yukon; 79 per cent in West Yukon; 52 per cent in Central Yukon; 58 per cent in Southeast Yukon; 68 per cent in Whitehorse.

By region, the percentage of residents who have received a second dose is: 60 per cent in North Yukon; 70 per cent in West Yukon; 41 per cent in Central Yukon; 50 per cent in Southeast Yukon; 25 per cent in Whitehorse. Visit Yukon.ca for the latest vaccination data and progress reporting.

A clinic in Whitehorse is open for residents age 18 and older to receive for first and second doses of the vaccine by appointment or by walk-in. The clinic will be closed April 2, 3 and 4, reopening on Monday, April 5.

Mobile vaccination teams continue to visit Yukon communities. Residents age 18 and older will have the opportunity receive their first or second shot during the next visit of the mobile team to their community. Everyone receiving a first shot is guaranteed a second shot within the designated time period.

Book an appointment and find more information.

COVID-19 testing

From Wednesday, March 24, to Tuesday March 30, there were 30 people tested at the COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre.

The COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre is open 8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m., Monday through Sunday. Those experiencing severe symptoms and requiring immediate assistance can go to the Whitehorse General Hospital Emergency Department, a community hospital or health centre.

Enforcement statistics

The Government of Yukon has received 1,651 complaints as of March 30:

  • Failure to self-isolate: 939
  • Gatherings over 10 inside or 50 outside: 43
  • Failure to transit through Yukon in 24 hours or stay on their designated route: 444
  • Businesses failing to comply with orders: 15
  • Failure to abide by declaration form: 35
  • Failure to wear a mask: 134
  • Failure to physical distance: 41

There have been five new charges since March 23. All five charges were issued by CEMA officers (four Failure to Self-Isolate charges and one Failure to Provide Declaration charge).

There have been a total of 70 charges and 55 people charged under the Civil Emergency Measures Act (CEMA).

Number of total incoming travellers: 75,373

  • Resident travellers: 20,249
  • BC residents: 16,140
  • NWT residents: 511
  • Other approved jurisdictions: 1102
  • Non-residents staying: 13,915
  • Non-residents transiting: 23,359
  • Other: 97
  • Decals distributed indicating out-of-territory vehicles allowed in Yukon: 384

March 24 – 11:34 – COVID-19 update

The Government of Yukon has the following updates for the Yukon public on measures being taken in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

COVID-19 cases and recoveries

As of Tuesday, March 23, the COVID-19 case count for Yukon is 72. Seventy-one people have recovered, one person has died, and there are no active cases. We have tested 6,823 people.

Monday, March 22, marked the one-year anniversary of Yukon’s first two COVID-19 cases.

Vaccination rollout progress

As of end of day Monday, March 22, there were 33,443 doses of the Moderna vaccine administered in Yukon. This number includes 22,795 first doses and 10,648 second doses.

By region, the percentage of residents who have received a first dose is: 69 per cent in North Yukon; 78 per cent in West Yukon; 52 per cent in Central Yukon; 56 per cent in Southeast Yukon; 65 per cent in Whitehorse.

By region, the percentage of residents who have received a second dose is: 60 per cent in North Yukon; 69 per cent in West Yukon; 41 per cent in Central Yukon; 47 per cent in Southeast Yukon; 24 per cent in Whitehorse. Visit Yukon.ca for the latest vaccination data and progress reporting.

A clinic in Whitehorse is open for residents age 18 and older to receive for first and second doses of the vaccine by appointment or by walk-in.

Mobile vaccination teams continue to visit Yukon communities in a third round. Residents age 18 and older will have the opportunity receive their first shot during this visit and are still guaranteed to receive their second dose at the appropriate time.

Book an appointment and find more information.

COVID-19 testing

From Wednesday, March 17, to Tuesday March 23, there were 43 people tested at the COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre.

The COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre is open 8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m., Monday through Sunday. Those experiencing severe symptoms and requiring immediate assistance can go to the Whitehorse General Hospital Emergency Department, a community hospital or health centre.

Enforcement statistics

The Government of Yukon has received 1,610 complaints as of March 23:

  • Failure to self-isolate: 909
  • Gatherings over 10 inside or 50 outside: 40
  • Failure to transit through Yukon in 24 hours or stay on their designated route: 444
  • Businesses failing to comply with orders: 14
  • Failure to abide by declaration form: 35
  • Failure to wear a mask: 128
  • Failure to physical distance: 40

There have been no new charges since March 16. There have been a total of 58 charges and 47 people charged under the Civil Emergency Measures Act (CEMA).

Number of total incoming travellers: 74,533

  • Resident travellers: 20,033
  • BC residents: 16,014
  • NWT residents: 511
  • Other approved jurisdictions: 1082
  • Non-residents staying: 13,642
  • Non-residents transiting: 23,154
  • Other: 97
  • Decals distributed indicating out-of-territory vehicles allowed in Yukon: 384

March 13 – 12:21 – Potential COVID-19 exposure at Silvertip mine, Northern BC

Yukon public health officials have been informed of cases of COVID-19 transmitted at Coeur Mining’s Silvertip mine in Northern BC.

All Yukon and Lower Post workers who were at the mine since this time are being individually notified either by the company, their employer or by Yukon Communicable Disease Control.

As a precaution, anyone working at the mine who has left the mine site within the previous two weeks should self-isolate until 14 days following their departure from the mine. In addition, anyone who has been at the mine site during the period from February 17 to the present should carefully self-monitor for symptoms of COVID-19. If any symptoms develop, however mild, they should immediately self-isolate and arrange to get tested.

People from Watson Lake and the surrounding area, including Lower Post, who were at the mine and have symptoms should contact the Watson Lake Community Hospital at 867-536-4444 to arrange for testing.

If you are in Whitehorse, you can get tested at the COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre (CTAC). The centre is open from 8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m., Monday through Sunday. Call 867-393-3083 for an appointment.

People in other Yukon communities can get tested at a community health centre.

Anyone experiencing COVID-19-like symptoms should self-isolate and remain at home, take the online self-assessment and arrange to get tested.

The symptoms to watch for are: 

  • fever;
  • chills;
  • cough;
  • difficulty breathing;
  • shortness of breath;
  • runny nose;
  • sore throat;
  • loss of sense of taste or smell;
  • headache;
  • fatigue;
  • loss of appetite;
  • nausea and vomiting;
  • diarrhea; and
  • muscle aches.

Safe 6 plus 1

Everyone should continue to follow the Safe 6 plus 1. Plus 1 means wear a mask in all indoor public spaces. Information about the Safe 6 is at: practisesafe6.ca

March 11 – 15:40 – Statement from Yukon’s Chief Medical Officer of Health advising Yukoners against all non-essential travel 

Yukon’s Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Brendan Hanley has issued the following statement:

“With March break quickly approaching, I am reminding Yukoners that non-essential travel out of territory is not recommended. Out of an abundance of caution, I continue to recommend against all non-essential travel at this time.

Due to the uncertainty and the quick-moving nature of COVID-19, we need to reduce the risk of bringing COVID-19 back into the territory. We must work together over these coming months to limit the introduction of COVID-19 and variants within Yukon, and this means following strict self-isolation requirements upon arrival into the territory.

Those who do travel will be required to self-isolate for 14 days upon return to Yukon; this is enforceable under the Civil Emergency Measures Act. The designated self-isolation facility in Whitehorse is not available to those who travel for recreation, entertainment or tourism purposes.”


March 10 – 12:02 – COVID-19 update

The Government of Yukon has the following updates for the Yukon public on measures being taken in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

COVID-19 cases and recoveries

As of Tuesday, March 9, the COVID-19 case count for Yukon is 72. Seventy-one people have recovered, one person has died and there are no active cases. We have tested 6,712 people.

Vaccination rollout progress

As of end of day Monday, March 8, there were 24,412 doses of the Moderna vaccine administered in Yukon. This number includes 15,572 first doses and 8,840 second doses. By region, the percentage of residents who have received a first dose is: 67 per cent in North Yukon; 71 per cent in West Yukon; 44 per cent in Central Yukon; 55 per cent in Southeast Yukon; and 38 per cent in Whitehorse. Visit Yukon.ca for the latest vaccination data and progress reporting.

A clinic opened March 1 in Whitehorse for residents age 18 and older to receive vaccines by appointment. Walk-ins to the clinic for first and second doses will be accepted beginning March 11.

Second vaccines for Yukon communities are ongoing. Residents age 18 and older will have the opportunity to receive their first shot during the second visit. A third visit will ensure that everyone in the communities is able to get immunized.

Book an appointment and find more information.

COVID-19 testing

From Wednesday, March 3, to Tuesday, March 9, there were 35 people tested at the COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre in Whitehorse.

The COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre is open 8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m., Monday through Sunday. People experiencing severe symptoms and requiring immediate assistance can go to the Whitehorse General Hospital Emergency Department, a community hospital or health centre.

Enforcement statistics

The Government of Yukon has received 1,548 complaints as of March 9:

  • Failure to self-isolate: 870
  • Gatherings over 10 inside or 50 outside: 40
  • Failure to transit through Yukon in 24 hours or stay on their designated route: 439
  • Businesses failing to comply with orders: 14
  • Failure to abide by declaration form: 29
  • Failure to wear a mask: 118
  • Failure to physical distance: 38

There have been five new charges since March 2:

All five charges were laid by CEMA officers (there were three failure to self-isolate charges and two failure to provide a declaration charges).

There have been a total of 58 charges and 47 people charged under the Civil Emergency Measures Act (CEMA).

Number of total incoming travellers: 73,109

  • Resident travellers: 19,627
  • BC residents: 15,912
  • NWT residents: 510
  • Other approved jurisdictions: 1054
  • Non-residents staying: 13,170
  • Non-residents transiting: 22,739
  • Other: 97
  • Decals distributed indicating out-of-territory vehicles allowed in Yukon: 384

March 3 – 11:06 – COVID-19 update

The Government of Yukon has the following updates for the Yukon public on measures being taken in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

State of Emergency

As of today, Yukon is extending the state of emergency under the Civil Emergency Measures Act. This extension is critical to supporting the health, safety and economic well-being of Yukoners, and ensures that all Ministerial Orders enacted under the State of Emergency remain in place, including the requirement for those entering the territory to self-isolate for 14 days.

A full list of the orders and legislative changes made under the Civil Emergency Measures Act can be found on Legislation changes for COVID-19.

COVID-19 cases and recoveries

As of Tuesday, March 2, the COVID-19 case count for Yukon is 72. Seventy-one people have recovered, one person has died, and there are no active cases. We have tested 6,667 people.

Vaccination rollout progress

As of end of day Monday, March 1, there were 17,168 doses of the Moderna vaccine administered in Yukon. This number includes 11,503 first doses and 5,665 second doses. Visit Yukon.ca for the latest vaccination data and progress reporting.

A clinic opened March 1 in Whitehorse for residents age 18 and older to receive vaccines by appointment.

Second vaccines for Yukon communities are underway. Residents age 18 and older will have the opportunity receive their first shot during the second visit. A third visit will ensure that everyone in the communities is able to get immunized.

Book an appointment and find more information about the vaccine. 

COVID-19 testing

From Wednesday, February 24, to Tuesday March 2, there were 43 people tested at the COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre.

The COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre is open 8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m., Monday through Sunday. Those experiencing severe symptoms and requiring immediate assistance can go to the Whitehorse General Hospital Emergency Department, a community hospital or health centre.

Enforcement statistics 

The Government of Yukon has received 1,517 complaints as of March 2:

  • Failure to self-isolate: 847
  • Gatherings over 10 inside or 50 outside: 38
  • Failure to transit through Yukon in 24 hours or stay on their designated route: 439
  • Businesses failing to comply with orders: 14
  • Failure to abide by declaration form: 27
  • Failure to wear a mask: 114
  • Failure to physical distance: 38

Two charges for failure to issue a declaration, one charge for failure to self-isolate as required, and one charge for failure to wear a mask have been laid since February 24.

There have been a total of 53 charges and 43 people charged under the Civil Emergency Measures Act.

Number of total incoming travellers: 71,452

  • Resident travellers: 19,353
  • BC residents: 15,810
  • NWT residents: 510
  • Other approved jurisdictions: 421
  • Non-residents staying: 12,863
  • Non-residents transiting: 22,394
  • Other: 1
  • Decals distributed indicating out-of-territory vehicles allowed in Yukon: 382

February 25 – 10:54 – COVID-19 update

The Government of Yukon has the following updates for the Yukon public on measures being taken in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

COVID-19 cases and recoveries

As of Wednesday, February 24, the COVID-19 case count for Yukon is 72 with no active cases. Seventy-one people have recovered and one person has died. We have tested 8,048 people.

Vaccination rollout progress

As of end of day Wednesday, February 24, there were 14,364 doses of the Moderna vaccine administered in Yukon. This number includes 10,781 first doses and 3,583 second doses. Visit Yukon.ca for the latest vaccination data and progress reporting.

Bookings for first and second doses in Whitehorse are available online and by phone.

Second vaccines are being administered in Yukon communities. Residents age 18 and older will have the opportunity to receive their first shot during the second visit. A third visit will ensure that everyone in the communities is able to get immunized.

COVID-19 testing

From Thursday, February 18, to Wednesday, February 24, there were 66 people tested at the COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre.

The COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre is open 8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m., Monday through Sunday. Those experiencing severe symptoms and requiring immediate assistance can go to the Whitehorse General Hospital Emergency Department, a community hospital or health centre.

Enforcement statistics

The Government of Yukon has received 1,495 complaints as of February 24:

  • Failure to self-isolate: 830
  • Gatherings over 10 inside or 50 outside: 38
  • Failure to transit through Yukon in 24 hours or stay on their designated route: 438
  • Businesses failing to comply with orders: 14
  • Failure to abide by declaration form: 27
  • Failure to wear a mask: 110
  • Failure to physical distance: 38

There was one new charge, for failure to wear a mask. The charge was laid by CEMA enforcement officers on February 19 in Whitehorse. There have been a total of 49 charges and 40 people charged under the Civil Emergency Measures Act (CEMA).

Number of total incoming travellers: 70,902

  • Resident travellers: 19,225
  • BC residents: 15,779
  • NWT residents: 510
  • Other approved jurisdictions: 402
  • Non-residents staying: 12,716
  • Non-residents transiting: 22,270
  • Decals distributed indicating out-of-territory vehicles allowed in Yukon: 381

February 18 – 11:29 – COVID-19 update

The Government of Yukon has the following updates for the Yukon public on measures being taken in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

COVID-19 cases and recoveries

As of Wednesday, February 17, the COVID-19 case count for Yukon is 72. Sixty-nine people have recovered, one person has died, and there are two active cases. We have tested 7,916 people.

Vaccination rollout progress

As of end of day Wednesday, February 17, there were 11,544 doses of the Moderna vaccine administered in Yukon. This number includes 10,627 first doses and 917 second doses. Visit Yukon.ca for the latest vaccination data and progress reporting.

Second vaccines are being administered in Yukon communities. Residents age 18 and older will have the opportunity receive their first shot during the second visit. A third visit will ensure that everyone in the communities is able to get immunized.

Bookings for a second dose will open soon online and by phone

COVID-19 testing

From Thursday, February 11, to Wednesday, February 17, there were 119 people tested at the COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre.

The COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre is open 8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m., Monday through Sunday. Those experiencing severe symptoms and requiring immediate assistance can go to the Whitehorse General Hospital Emergency Department, a community hospital or health centre.

Enforcement statistics

The Government of Yukon has received 1,459 complaints as of February 17:

  • Failure to self-isolate: 812
  • Gatherings over 10 inside or 50 outside: 38
  • Failure to transit through Yukon in 24 hours or stay on their designated route: 436
  • Businesses failing to comply with orders: 14
  • Failure to abide by declaration form: 26
  • Failure to wear a mask: 97
  • Failure to physical distance: 36

There have been a total of 48 charges and 39 people charged under the Civil Emergency Measures Act (CEMA). No new charges since the last report on February 10.

Number of total incoming travellers: 70,576

  • Resident travellers: 19,058
  • BC residents: 15,731
  • NWT residents: 508
  • Other approved jurisdictions: 398
  • Non-residents staying: 12,583
  • Non-residents transiting: 22,137
  • Other: 161
  • Decals distributed indicating out-of-territory vehicles allowed in Yukon: 381

February 11 – 10:10 – COVID-19 update

The Government of Yukon has the following updates for the Yukon public on measures being taken in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

COVID-19 cases and recoveries

As of Wednesday, February 10, the COVID-19 case count for Yukon is 70. Sixty-nine people have recovered, one person has died, and there are no active cases. We have tested 6,414 people.

Vaccination rollout progress

As of end of day Wednesday, February 10, there were 11,344 doses of the Moderna vaccine administered in Yukon. This number includes 10,603 first doses and 830 second doses. Visit Yukon.ca for the latest vaccination data and progress reporting.

A mobile clinic in Dawson is administering vaccines this week at the long-term health care facility.

Second vaccines for other Yukon communities will be available in the near future. Residents age 18 and older will have the opportunity receive their first shot during the second visit. A third visit will ensure that everyone in the communities is able to get immunized.

Bookings for a second dose will open soon online and by phone.

COVID-19 testing

From Wednesday, February 3, to Wednesday, February 10, there were 132 people tested at the COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre.

The COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre is open 8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m., Monday through Sunday. Those experiencing severe symptoms and requiring immediate assistance can go to the Whitehorse General Hospital Emergency Department, a community hospital or health centre.

Enforcement statistics

The Government of Yukon has received 1,436 complaints as of February 10:

  • Failure to self-isolate: 801
  • Gatherings over 10 inside or 50 outside: 38
  • Failure to transit through Yukon in 24 hours or stay on their designated route: 436
  • Businesses failing to comply with orders: 14
  • Failure to abide by declaration form: 26
  • Failure to wear a mask: 85
  • Failure to physical distance: 36

There have been a total of 48 charges and 39 people charged under the Civil Emergency Measures Act (CEMA). No new charges since the last report on February 3.

Number of total incoming travellers: 69,948

  • Resident travellers: 18,917
  • BC residents: 15,668
  • NWT residents: 508
  • Other approved jurisdictions: 388
  • Non-residents staying: 12,352
  • Non-residents transiting: 22,018
  • Other: 97
  • Decals distributed indicating out-of-territory vehicles allowed in Yukon: 380

February 4 – 10:00 – COVID-19 update

The Government of Yukon has the following updates for the Yukon public on measures being taken in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

COVID-19 cases and recoveries

As of today, February 4, the COVID-19 case count for Yukon is 70. Sixty-nine people have recovered, one person has died, and there are no active cases. We have tested 6,315 people.

Vaccination rollout progress

As of end of day Wednesday, February 3, there were 9,931 doses of the Moderna vaccine administered in Yukon. Visit Yukon.ca for the latest vaccination data and progress reporting.

Mobile clinics administering vaccines to residents age 18 and older have completed trips to Pelly Crossing, Teslin, Carcross and Tagish. This week they are in Burwash Landing, Destruction Bay, Carmacks, Faro, Haines Junction, Mayo and Stewart Crossing.

A second vaccine dose is being administered to all staff and residents of long-term care homes beginning February 1.

Second vaccines for the communities will be available in the near future when the mobile clinics return. Residents will have the opportunity receive their first shot during the second visit. A third visit will ensure that everyone in the communities is able to get immunized. Second doses will be available to all those who receive the first dose prior to February 6.  The booking site for second doses will be available early next week for both rural and Whitehorse residents.

Plans to open a Whitehorse vaccination clinic for the general public February 10 are being delayed until further notice due to a lag in shipments of the vaccine. Yukon’s vaccine rollout schedule was designed to be flexible based on vaccine availability. The supply of vaccines remains the responsibility of the federal government and we continue to receive assurances that Yukon will receive its full allotment of doses before March 31, 2021.

To date, the information that we have received still means that all Yukon citizens who would like to be immunized will be able to receive the vaccine by the end of April 2021.

COVID-19 testing

From Wednesday, January 27, to Tuesday, February 2, there were 70 people tested at the COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre and drive-thru testing locations.

The COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre is open 8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m., Monday through Sunday. Those experiencing severe symptoms and requiring immediate assistance can go to the Whitehorse General Hospital Emergency Department, a community hospital or health centre.

Enforcement statistics 

The Government of Yukon has received 1,414 complaints as of February 3:

  • Failure to self-isolate: 791
  • Gatherings over 10 inside or 50 outside: 38
  • Failure to transit through Yukon in 24 hours or stay on their designated route: 432
  • Businesses failing to comply with orders: 14
  • Failure to abide by declaration form: 23
  • Failure to wear a mask: 80
  • Failure to physical distance: 36

There have been a total of 48 charges and 39 people charged under the Civil Emergency Measures Act (CEMA), including 2 new charges since the last COVID-19 update on January 26.

New CEMA charges: 

  • Failure to self-isolate: 1
  • Failure to behave in a manner consistent with declaration: 1

Number of total incoming travellers: 69,288

  • Resident travellers: 18,713
  • BC residents: 15,605
  • NWT residents: 506
  • Other approved jurisdictions: 385
  • Non-residents staying: 12,155
  • Non-residents transiting: 21,825
  • Other: 99
  • Decals distributed indicating out-of-territory vehicles allowed in Yukon: 379

January 27 – 14:06 – COVID-19 update

The Government of Yukon has the following updates for the Yukon public on measures being taken in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

COVID-19 cases and recoveries

As of today, January 27, the COVID-19 case count for Yukon is 70. Sixty-nine people have recovered, one person has died, and there are no active cases. We have tested 6,245 people.

Vaccination rollout progress

As of end of day Tuesday, January 26, there were 5,170 doses of the Moderna vaccine administered in Yukon. Visit Yukon.ca for the latest vaccination data and progress reporting.

There are currently 14 mobile clinics scheduled in rural and remote areas, and residents within designated communities who are age 18 and older can receive a vaccine. A mobile clinic will also be offering a second vaccine dose to all staff and residents of long-term care homes starting the week of February 1.

Yukoners living in Whitehorse, Ibex Valley, Marsh Lake and Mount Lorne areas aged 60 and older can now book appointments for the week starting February 1. Those 65 and older are already eligible to book an appointment and receive a vaccine, and everyone 18 and over can receive a shot starting February 10.

Appointments can be booked at yukon.ca/this-is-our-shot or by calling 1-877-374-0425. Proof of residency will be required to receive a vaccination, such as government issued identification, a Yukon health care card, or mail displaying your name and address. After receiving a vaccine Yukoners must continue following health measures, such as wearing a mask.

COVID-19 testing

From Wednesday, January 20, to Tuesday, January 26, there were 45 people tested at the COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre and drive-thru testing locations.

The COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre is open 8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m., Monday through Sunday. Those experiencing severe symptoms and requiring immediate assistance can go to the Whitehorse General Hospital Emergency Department, a community hospital or health centre.

Enforcement statistics

The Government of Yukon has received 1,383 complaints as of January 26:

  • Failure to self-isolate: 771
  • Gatherings over 10 inside or 50 outside: 37
  • Failure to transit through Yukon in 24 hours or stay on their designated route: 430
  • Businesses failing to comply with orders: 14
  • Failure to abide by declaration form: 21
  • Failure to wear a mask: 74
  • Failure to physical distance: 36

There have been a total of 46 charges and 37 people charged under the Civil Emergency Measures Act (CEMA), including 6 new charges since the last COVID-19 update on January 20.

New CEMA charges: 

  • Failure to self-isolate: 4
  • Failure to behave in a manner consistent with declaration: 2

Number of total incoming travellers: 68,816

  • Resident travellers: 18,547
  • BC residents: 15,556
  • NWT residents: 506
  • Other approved jurisdictions: 373
  • Non-residents staying: 12,016
  • Non-residents transiting: 21,719
  • Other: 99
  • Decals distributed indicating out-of-territory vehicles allowed in Yukon: 375

January 20 – 13:30 – COVID-19 update

The Government of Yukon has the following updates for the Yukon public on measures being taken in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

COVID-19 cases and recoveries

As of today, January 20, the COVID-19 case count for Yukon is 70. Sixty-nine people have recovered, one person has died and there are no active cases. We have tested 6,175 people.

Vaccination rollout progress

As of end of day Tuesday, 2,590 Yukoners have received their first dose of the Moderna vaccine, including all staff and residents of long-term care homes who chose to participate. Visit Yukon.ca for the latest vaccination data and progress reporting.

There are currently 18 mobile clinics scheduled in rural and remote areas, and residents within designated communities who are age 18 and older can receive a vaccine.

Yukoners living in Whitehorse, Ibex Valley, Marsh Lake and Mount Lorne areas can also book a vaccine appointment if they are 70 years and older or live in group settings. Whitehorse and area residents age 60 and older will be eligible starting February 1 and everyone 18 and over can receive a shot starting February 10.

Appointments can be booked at yukon.ca/this-is-our-shot or by calling 1-877-374-0425. After receiving a vaccine Yukoners must continue following health measures, such as wearing a mask.

COVID-19 testing

From Wednesday, January 13, to Tuesday, January 19, there were 56 people tested at the COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre and drive-thru testing locations in Whitehorse.

The COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre (CTAC) is open 8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m., Monday through Sunday. The drive-thru testing centre in Whitehorse will be closing at the end of the day Friday, January 22, as significantly fewer Yukoners have been using the service in recent weeks. Services at the CTAC will be enhanced as required.  

Those experiencing severe symptoms and requiring immediate assistance can go to the Whitehorse General Hospital Emergency Department, a community hospital or a health centre.

Enforcement statistics

The Government of Yukon has received 1,349 complaints as of January 20:

  • Failure to self-isolate: 753
  • Gatherings over 10 inside or 50 outside: 35
  • Failure to transit through Yukon in 24 hours or stay on their designated route: 425
  • Businesses failing to comply with orders: 14
  • Failure to abide by declaration form: 19
  • Failure to wear a mask: 68
  • Failure to physical distance: 35

There have been a total of 40 charges and 33 people charged under the Civil Emergency Measures Act (CEMA), including 1 new charge since the last COVID-19 update on January 13.

New CEMA charges: 

  • Failure to self-isolate: 1

Number of total incoming travellers: 68,295

  • Resident travellers: 18,394
  • BC residents: 15,477
  • NWT residents: 506
  • Other approved jurisdictions: 356
  • Non-residents staying: 11,844
  • Non-residents transiting: 21,619
  • Other: 99
  • Decals distributed indicating out-of-territory vehicles allowed in Yukon: 273

January 13 – 14:15 – COVID-19 update

The Government of Yukon has the following updates for the Yukon public on measures being taken in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

COVID-19 cases and recoveries

As of today, January 13, the COVID-19 case count for Yukon is 70. Sixty-three people have recovered, one person has died and there are six active cases. We have tested 6,130 people.

Vaccination rollout progress

A second shipment of 7,200 Moderna vaccines will arrive on January 14. As of yesterday, 685 residents and staff in long-term care homes had received their first dose of the vaccine. Visit Yukon.ca for the latest vaccination data and progress reporting.

Some Yukoners can begin registering for COVID-19 vaccinations online starting today by going to yukon.ca/this-is-our-shot. Mobile vaccine clinics will be in Watson Lake on January 18, Beaver Creek on January 21 and Old Crow on January 22. Vaccinations will also begin in Whitehorse on January 18 for select groups. For these first weeks in Whitehorse, immunizations will be available to:

  • high risk health care workers who may care for or be in contact with COVID-19 patients;
  • older adults (starting with 70 years and older); and
  • people who are marginalized and living in group settings like the Whitehorse Emergency Shelter and Whitehorse Correctional Centre.

Beginning Thursday, January 14, appointments can be booked by calling 1-877-374-0425. Immunization times and locations will be updated regularly on Yukon.ca.

COVID-19 vaccines are not currently approved for children or recommended for pregnant people. After receiving the vaccine Yukoners must continue following health measures, such as wearing a mask.

COVID-19 testing schedule 

The COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre in Whiteho is open 8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m., Monday through Sunday. The drive-thru testing centre in Whitehorse is open from 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., Monday to Friday, except for statutory holidays.

Those experiencing severe symptoms and requiring immediate assistance can go to the Whitehorse General Hospital Emergency Department, a community hospital or a health centre.

From Thursday, January 7, to Wednesday, January 13, there were 59 people tested at the COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre and drive-thru testing locations in Whitehorse.

Enforcement statistics

The Government of Yukon has received 1,317 complaints as of January 7:

  • Failure to self-isolate: 733
  • Gatherings over 10 inside or 50 outside: 35
  • Failure to transit through Yukon in 24 hours or stay on their designated route: 422
  • Businesses failing to comply with orders: 14
  • Failure to abide by declaration form or were not permitted entry into Yukon: 18
  • Failure to wear a mask: 61

There have been a total of 39 charges and 32 people charged under the Civil Emergency Measures Act (CEMA), including 3 new charges since the last COVID-19 update on January 7.

New CEMA charges:  

  • Failure to self-isolate: 1
  • Failure to wear a mask: 2

Number of total incoming travellers: 67,490

  • Resident travellers: 18,114
  • BC residents: 15,419
  • NWT residents: 506
  • Other approved jurisdictions: 339
  • Non-residents staying: 11,609
  • Non-residents transiting: 21,407
  • Other: 99
  • Decals distributed indicating out-of-territory vehicles allowed in Yukon: 363

January 7 – 16:35 – COVID-19 update

The Government of Yukon has the following updates for the Yukon public on measures being taken in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

COVID-19 cases and recoveries

As of today, January 7, the COVID-19 case count for Yukon is 69. Fifty-nine people have recovered, one person has died, and there are 9 active cases. We have tested 6,057 people.

Vaccinations

COVID-19 vaccinations are underway in Yukon with 310 doses given out between January 4 and 6, 2021. Regular updates on total vaccinations will be provided every Wednesday and posted to Yukon.ca.

Yukon is expected to receive enough doses of the Moderna vaccine to vaccinate 75 per cent of the adult population by the end of March. No vaccine is currently approved for children or recommended for pregnant people.

Traffic stoplight guidelines

If you're feeling ill, consult the traffic light guidelines on Yukon.ca.  The guidelines advise how to monitor your symptoms and when it is appropriate to seek out testing and when you can resume regular activities. 

Yukoners are encouraged to get tested

Anyone experiencing symptoms of COVID-19 are encouraged to get tested. Make an appointment online or by telephone at 867-393-3083. For medical questions or if you feel ill, phone 811, or launch the COVID-19 self-assessment tool.

COVID-19 testing schedule

The COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre is open 8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Sunday. The drive-thru testing centre in Whitehorse is open from 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Monday to Friday, except for statutory holidays.

Those experiencing severe symptoms and requiring immediate assistance can go to the Whitehorse General Hospital Emergency Department, a community hospital or health centre.

From Monday, December 28, to Wednesday, January 6, there were 149 people tested at the COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre and drive-thru testing locations in Whitehorse.

Enforcement statistics

The Government of Yukon has received 1,277 complaints as of January 7:

  • Failure to self-isolate: 714
  • Gatherings over 10 inside or 50 outside: 35
  • Failure to transit through Yukon in 24 hours or stay on their designated route: 419
  • Businesses failing to comply with orders: 14
  • Failure to abide by declaration form or we’re not permitted entry into Yukon: 18
  • Failure to wear a mask: 46

There have been a total of 37 charges and 30 people charged under the Civil Emergency Measures Act (CEMA), including 5 new charges since the last COVID-19 update on December 23.

New CEMA charges:  

  • Failure to self-isolate: 3
  • Failure to behave in a manner consistent with declaration: 1
  • Failure to wear a mask: 1

Number of total incoming travellers: 67,209

  • Resident travellers: 18,042
  • BC residents: 15,392
  • NWT residents: 502
  • Other approved jurisdictions: 329
  • Non-residents staying: 11,473
  • Non-residents transiting: 21,362
  • Other: 99
  • Decals distributed indicating out-of-territory vehicles allowed in Yukon: 361

January 1 – 18:09 – four new COVID-19 cases confirmed

Yukon’s Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Brendan Hanley confirms four new cases of COVID-19 today, bringing the territory’s total to 64 cases. There are currently four active cases in Yukon.

Cases 61, 62, 63, 64: Yukoners, close or household contacts of an out-of-territory traveller
Health status: Recovering at home

Public exposure notices

People may have been exposed to COVID-19 infection in these two places:

  • Tuesday, December 22, 2020
    • Air North 2517 Vancouver to Whitehorse, 12:15 p.m. (PST) to 4:50 p.m. (MST)
  • Sunday, December 27, 2020
    • Canada Games Centre, Whitehorse, in the Wellness Room, 1:30 p.m. to 4 p.m.

Anyone experiencing any COVID-19 like symptoms should self-isolate and remain at home, take the self-assessment online and arrange to get tested.

Safe 6 plus 1

Everyone in Yukon should follow the Safe 6 plus 1. The plus 1 means wear a mask in all indoor public places. Information about the Safe 6 is at practisesafe6.ca.


December 22 – 15:43 – COVID-19 update

The Government of Yukon has the following updates for the Yukon public on measures being taken in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

COVID-19 cases and recoveries

As of today, December 22, the COVID-19 case count for Yukon is 59. Fifty-eight people have recovered, one person has died and there are no active cases. We have tested 5,872 people.

Visitor isolation options and guidelines

There are options for visitors to Yukon who are sharing accommodations with others who have not travelled outside Yukon.

Option 1

Visitors can self-isolate for 14 days without physical distancing within a home if all residents are isolating together with no outside contact. For example, a visiting university student and their family can hug, share meals and share living spaces if no one has contact outside the home for the entire isolation period.

Households that have guests departing prior to the 14 days may leave isolation three days after their departure, as long as they self-monitor and check in with their guests. If neither have symptoms during those three days then they're able to return to their daily lives.

Option 2

If someone in the household chooses to go to work, school or run errands, then guests in self-isolation must maintain two metres distance at all times within that home.

Find more information about visitor self-isolation is available.

COVID-19 testing schedule during the holidays

During the holidays, the COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre (CTAC)  will close at 4 p.m. on December 24 and remain closed December 25 and 26. The drive-thru testing centre will be closed from December 25 to 28 as well as on January 1.

Those experiencing severe symptoms and requiring immediate assistance can go to the Whitehorse General Hospital Emergency Department, a community hospital or health centre.

From Monday, December 14, to Sunday, December 20, we tested 80 people at the COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre (CTAC) and drive-thru testing locations in Whitehorse.

Enforcement statistics

The Government of Yukon has received 1,198 complaints as of December 21:

  • Failure to self-isolate: 697
  • Gatherings over 10 inside or 50 outside: 32
  • Failure to transit through Yukon in 24 hours or stay on their designated route: 411
  • Businesses failing to comply with orders: 12
  • Failure to abide by declaration form or were not permitted entry into Yukon: 18
  • Failure to wear a mask: 28

There have been a total of 32 charges, and 27 people charged under the Civil Emergency Measures Act (CEMA), including one new charge for failure to isolate.

Number of total incoming travellers: 65,777

  • Resident travellers: 17,597
  • BC residents: 15,293
  • NWT residents: 492
  • Other approved jurisdictions: 329
  • Non-residents staying: 10,910
  • Non-residents transiting: 21,057
  • Other: 99
  • Decals distributed indicating out-of-territory vehicles allowed in Yukon: 354

December 17 – 10:00 – COVID-19 update

The Government of Yukon has the following updates for the Yukon public on measures being taken in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

COVID-19 cases and recoveries

As of today, December 17, the COVID-19 case count for Yukon is 59. Fifty-seven people have recovered, one person has died, and there is currently one active case. We have tested 5,790 people.

Social bubble guidelines: COVID-19

As COVID-19 continues in Yukon and the holiday season approaches, we’re asking Yukoners to be careful and respect gathering guidelines and stick to their social bubbles.

Your social bubble can include up to 15 people, but the smaller your bubble, the smaller the risk of being exposed to COVID-19. We encourage you to reduce your bubble to fewer than 10 where possible. Don’t forget, indoor gatherings are limited to 10 people. If you gather with anyone who’s not in your social bubble, you must keep a two-metre (six feet) distance from them at all times.

Read more information on the social bubble guidelines.

Automatic text upon entry in Yukon

As of Monday, December 14, every person who signed a declaration when they entered Yukon will receive a text message approximately 72 hours after their arrival. This text message is a reminder of their obligation to self-isolate upon arrival in Yukon and provides a link to Yukon.ca for information and resources. The message is sent in both English and French.

COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre

From Monday, December 7, to Wednesday, December 16, we tested 201 people at the COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre (CTAC) and drive-thru testing locations in Whitehorse.

The drive-thru COVID-19 testing centre remains open with reduced hours. It’s now open Monday to Saturday from 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., at the same location.

Contact information for restaurant and bar customers

Since December 7, restaurants and bars have been collecting their customers’ contact information in case we need to do contact tracing. We recommend that businesses collect last as well as first names of customers and, for confidentiality purposes, make sure information isn’t accessible to any other customers.

We recommend that businesses collect:

the first and last name and telephone number or email address of at least one member of every party;
the total number in the group;
the date and time of entry; and
the table number or location.

We appreciate the steps restaurants and bars are taking to help stop the spread of infection.

Enforcement statistics

The Government of Yukon has received 1,181 complaints as of December 16:

Failure to self-isolate: 688
Gatherings over 10 inside or 50 outside: 31
Failure to transit through Yukon in 24 hours or stay on their designated route: 407
Businesses failing to comply with orders: 12
Failure to abide by declaration form or we’re not permitted entry into Yukon: 18
Failure to wear a mask: 25

There have been a total of 31 charges, and 26 people charged under the Civil Emergency Measures Act (CEMA).

Number of total incoming travellers: 65,354

Resident travellers: 17,433
BC residents: 15,260
NWT residents: 490
Other approved jurisdictions: 318
Non-residents staying: 10,777
Non-residents transiting: 20,977
Other: 99
Decals distributed indicating out-of-territory vehicles allowed in Yukon: 354


December 10 – 14:27 – Strategy for COVID-19 vaccinations in Yukon released

The Government of Yukon has released Yukon’s COVID-19 Vaccine Strategy. The strategy outlines Yukon’s plan to safely and efficiently deliver COVID-19 vaccines across the territory.

All eligible, adult Yukoners who want to receive a COVID-19 vaccine will have access to one, at no cost, in early 2021. No vaccine is currently approved for children or recommended for pregnant people.

Yukon will be receiving enough vaccine to immunize 75 per cent of the eligible adult population in the first quarter of 2021. This allocation recognizes Yukon’s significant Indigenous populations and remote communities. If more Yukoners choose to immunize, additional vaccine doses will be available in the second quarter of 2021.

Safe and effective vaccines will reduce the transmission of the virus that causes COVID-19 and associated illnesses and deaths. Over time, widespread immunization will allow Yukoners to live with fewer restrictions as outlined in A Path Forward: Yukon’s plan for lifting COVID-19 restrictions.

Read Yukon's COVID-19 Vaccine Strategy.


December 8 – 13:37 – COVID-19 update

The Government of Yukon has the following updates for the Yukon public on measures being taken in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

COVID-19 cases and recoveries

As of today, December 8, the COVID-19 case count for Yukon is 58.  Forty-seven people have recovered, one person has died and there are currently 10 active cases. We have tested 5,607 people.

Guidelines for visitors

Visitors from outside the territory must isolate for 14 days in Whitehorse, unless they are a Yukon resident with a home outside the city or are isolating with a Yukon family member who lives outside the city. Visitors who are isolating at a shared location with others must follow specific guidelines.

Contact information at bars and restaurants

Patrons are now required to provide contact information at bars and restaurants to support contact tracing. Information is only meant for use by Yukon Communicable Disease Control health officials when required, and will be stored and disposed of within 30 days.

Mandatory masks

Mandatory masks rules came into affect for all public indoor spaces on December 1. Adherence to mask wearing and public feedback is being monitored and public education and compliance measures will be developed as needed. By wearing masks and following the Safe 6, Yukoners will have the greatest impact on limiting the spread of COVID-19.

COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre

From Monday, November 30, to Sunday, December 6, we tested 282 people at the testing centre and drive-thru testing locations in Whitehorse.

Enforcement statistics

The Government of Yukon has received 1,130 complaints as of December 7:

  • Failure to self-isolate: 655
  • Gatherings over 10 inside or 50 outside: 30
  • Failure to transit through Yukon in 24 hours or stay on the designated route: 403
  • Businesses failing to comply with orders: 11
  • Failure to abide by a declaration form or not permitted entry into Yukon: 18
  • Failure to wear a mask: 13

There have been a total of 26 people charged, and 21 people charged under the Civil Emergency Measures Act (CEMA).

A total of 64,676 travellers have come into Yukon:

  • Resident travellers: 17,163
  • BC residents: 15,221
  • NWT residents: 486
  • Other approved jurisdictions: 309
  • Non-residents staying: 10,573
  • Non-residents transiting: 20,825
  • Other: 99
  • Decals distributed indicating out-of-territory vehicles allowed in Yukon: 350

December 4 – 17:12 – Three new COVID-19 cases confirmed

Yukon’s Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Brendan Hanley confirms three new cases of COVID-19 today, bringing the territory’s total to 54 cases. There are currently 12 active cases in Yukon.

  • Case 52 is in Whitehorse and is linked to a previous case.
  • Case 53 is in Whitehorse and is linked to travel outside Yukon.
  • Case 54 is in Whitehorse and under active investigation.

Exposure notices

People may have been exposed to COVID-19 infection if they were at one of the following locations:

  • Thursday, November 26 between 12:30 p.m. and 2:30 p.m.
    • Real Canadian Superstore
    • Wykes’ Your Independent Grocer
    • The Whitehorse Liquor Store
       
  • Friday, November 27, 2020  
    • The Black Sabbath and Deep Purple Tribute concert at The Local Bar, 206 Jarvis Street, from 8:30 p.m. to closing.

One of the following flights:

  • Friday, November 27, 2020
    • AC 25 Calgary to Vancouver
      11:50 a.m. (MST)-12:15 p.m. (PST) 
       
    • AC 8887 Vancouver to Whitehorse
      1:35 p.m. (PST)-4:59 p.m. (MST)

People in Whitehorse with symptoms

Anyone in Whitehorse who is experiencing symptoms and has been at these locations should call the COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre at 867-393-3083 to arrange for testing. People can also drop in at the drive-thru testing centre from 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. at Centennial Motors on the Alaska Highway across from the airport.

Due to a high volume of calls, people may be asked to leave a number where they can be contacted. The centre staff will return their call. Anyone not receiving a call within 24 hours should call back.

People in communities with symptoms

People in communities should contact their rural community health centre.

People who do not have symptoms

Anyone who does not have symptoms and is not notified by a health professional that they’re a contact of someone with COVID-19 may continue with their usual activities.

People waiting for test results

Anyone waiting for a test result must self-isolate until they receive their result.

Contacts of people at exposure locations

People who were in contact with anyone who was at a location listed above are a secondary contact. Secondary contacts should monitor themselves for symptoms but do not need to self-isolate.

Safe 6 plus 1

Everyone in Yukon should follow the Safe 6 plus 1. The plus 1 means wear a mask in all indoor public places. Information about the Safe 6 is at: practisesafe6.ca

COVID-19 symptoms reminder

Anyone experiencing any of the following symptoms should self-isolate and arrange to be tested immediately.

  • fever
  • chills
  • cough
  • difficulty breathing
  • shortness of breath
  • runny nose
  • sore throat
  • loss of sense of taste or smell
  • headache
  • fatigue
  • loss of appetite
  • nausea and vomiting
  • diarrhea

muscle aches


December 4 – 13:20 – New requirement to assist with contact tracing

Beginning Monday, December 7, 2020, restaurants and bars throughout Yukon will be required to maintain a daily list of patrons. Yukon’s Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Brendan Hanley, has introduced this requirement to assist with contact tracing.

One patron in each party will be required to sign in and provide contact information. The eating and drinking establishments will be required to keep the sheets for 30 days. They will only be provided to Yukon Communicable Disease Control if an exposure has been identified.

Find the most up-to-date information on Yukon restaurants and bars.


December 2 – 18:14 – COVID-19 update

Yukon’s Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Brendan Hanley confirms one new case of COVID-19 today, bringing the territory’s total to 50 cases. There are currently 20 active cases in Yukon.

Case 48 and 49 from Tuesday, December 1, are linked to a previous case.

Case 50 from Wednesday, December 2, is in Whitehorse and is currently under investigation.  

Public exposure notifications are being issued for:

  • Winter Long Brewing Co.
    • Friday, November 27 between 5:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m.
  • Whiskey Jacks Pub & Grill
    • Wednesday, November 25 between 4:30 p.m. and 6:30 p.m.

If you are experiencing any symptoms and have been at these locations, call the COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre in Whitehorse at 867-393-3083 to arrange for testing. Or drop in at the drive-thru testing centre located at Centennial Motors on the Alaska Highway across from the airport.

You can also contact your rural community health centre.

Due to a high volume of calls, you may be required to leave a number where you can be contacted. The COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre staff will return your call. If you do not receive a call within 24 hours, please call back.

If you are waiting for a test result you must self-isolate until you receive your result.

If you were in contact with anyone who was at a location listed above, you are a secondary contact. In this situation, we ask that you monitor yourself for symptoms but you do not need to self-isolate.

If you are not notified and do not have symptoms, you may continue your usual daily activities, while following the Safe 6 plus 1 (wear a mask).

Anyone who is experiencing any of the following symptoms, is asked to self-isolate and arrange for testing immediately: 

  • Fever
  • Chills
  • Cough
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Shortness of breath
  • Runny nose
  • Sore throat
  • Loss of sense of taste or smell
  • Headache
  • Fatigue
  • Loss of appetite
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Muscle aches

The Government of Yukon encourages Yukoners to remain calm and continue to follow the Safe 6 plus 1 (wear a mask).


December 1 – 13:35 – COVID-19 update

The Government of Yukon has the following updates for the Yukon public on measures being taken in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

COVID-19 cases and recoveries

As of today, December 1, the COVID-19 case count for Yukon is 47. Twenty nine people have recovered, one person has died, and there are currently 17 active cases. We have tested 5,336 people.

Support programs

Learn more about a variety of supports available to help Yukoners during the pandemic. Available supports include:

  • paid sick leave rebates for employers;
  • employee access to unpaid sick leave;
  • new relief funding programs for the tourism sector and non-profit organizations; and
  • relief grants to cover fixed costs for businesses.

Extension of drive-thru screening in Whitehorse

Drive-thru screening has been extended until further notice at 91628 Alaska Highway (the old Centennial Motors wash bay). Testing is available from 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. seven days per week. The COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre (CTAC) also continues to open from 8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. every day of the week.

From Monday, November 23, to Sunday, November 29, we tested 632 people at the CTAC and drive-thru testing locations in Whitehorse.

Confidentiality and accurate information

Information about positive cases including community locations is provided in cautious balance with safeguarding Yukoners’ privacy. Public health is a priority, and more specific information is released when required and recommended by the Chief Medical Officer of Health. Please visit yukon.ca for more information. 

Follow posted guidelines

Please follow posted health and safety guidelines at all times when in restaurants and other locations. General guidelines include a maximum of six people seated together at the same table, maintaining two metres distancing between tables, and staying home if you feel sick.

Mandatory masks must also be worn at all times in public indoor spaces.

If you were in one of these locations during these times and you develop symptoms phone the COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre 867-393-3083 in Whitehorse; or contact your nearest community health centre.

Enforcement statistics

The Government of Yukon has received 1,079 complaints as of November 30:

  • Failure to self-isolate: 630
  • Gatherings over 10 inside or 50 outside: 28
  • Failure to transit through Yukon in 24 hours or stay on the designated route: 392
  • Businesses failing to comply with orders: 11
  • Failure to abide by a declaration form or not permitted entry into Yukon: 18

There have been a total of 26 people charged, and 21 people charged under the Civil Emergency Measures Act (CEMA).

A total of 64,061 travellers have come into Yukon:

  • Resident travellers: 16,910
  • BC residents: 15,195
  • NWT residents: 486
  • Other approved jurisdictions: 303
  • Non-residents staying: 10,391
  • Non-residents transiting: 20,677
  • Other: 99
  • Decals distributed indicating out-of-territory vehicles allowed in Yukon: 348

December 1 – 13:19 (updated at 16:37) – Masks now mandatory in all indoor public space

Effective today, the use of masks is mandatory in all indoor public spaces in Yukon. The mandate on masks authorized by a Ministerial Order under the Civil Emergency Measures Act ensures a heightened public health response to COVID-19.

Masks are now required to be worn by everyone five years and older in most indoor public spaces. These include:

  • shopping centres and retail businesses such as grocery stores, pharmacies and clothing stores;
  • service businesses;
  • locations that provide personal services or health care provider services;
  • restaurants, bars and other places selling food or drink;
  • places of public worship or a faith gathering;
  • places for sports, fitness and dance activities;
  • places where non-profit organizations provide goods or services to the public;
  • movie theatres, art centres, concert halls, billiard halls, museums and libraries;
  • conference centres, community centres and community halls;
  • indoor common areas of:
    • office buildings;
    • government buildings (other than a school);
    • multi-unit residential buildings;
    • hospitals;
    • hotels, bed and breakfasts and rental cabins; and
    • Yukon university campuses.
  • entrances of daycare centres and day homes; and
  • on public transportation, in taxis, shuttles or other vehicles for hire.

Schools are not considered a public space. However, school staff and students age 10 and older are required to wear a non-medical mask on the school bus and in school common areas.

The Government of Yukon encourages individuals, businesses and organizations to abide by the new mask Order to reduce the risk of COVID-19 transmission in Yukon.

For the purposes of this Order, a mask is defined as a medical or non-medical mask that covers the mouth and nose.

When in an indoor space, masks may be temporarily removed if people are seated at a table in a restaurant or bar, participating in a sport or fitness activity, or providing or receiving personal or health care services that require the mask to be removed.

Anyone without a mask in an indoor space or who refuses to comply with the direction of an enforcement officer, including refusing to leave a public space where masks are required or engage in abusive or belligerent behaviour, may be subject to a $500 fine.

November 29 – 16:45 – New COVID-19 case confirmed

Yukon Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Brendan Hanley confirmed one new case of COVID-19 today, bringing the territory’s total to 46 cases. There are currently 16 active cases in Yukon.

This case is in Whitehorse and is currently under investigation. 

An additional public exposure notification is being issued for:

  • Baked Café & Bakery
    • Saturday, November 21 between 12:30 p.m. and 2 p.m.

If you are experiencing any symptoms and were at this location, self-isolate immediately and call the COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre at 867-393-3083 to arrange for testing, or drop in at the drive-thru testing centre located at Centennial Motors on the Alaska Highway across from the airport in Whitehorse.

If you are outside of Whitehorse but were at the location on the indicated date and time, contact your rural community health centre.

Due to a high volume of calls, you may be require to leave a phone number. If you do not receive a call within 24 hours please call back.

If you are waiting for test results you must self-isolate until you receive your results.

If you were in contact with anyone who was at a location listed in the public exposure notices, you are a secondary contact. In this situation, it is always wise to monitor yourself for symptoms but you do not need to self-isolate.

If you are not notified and do not have symptoms, you may continue usual daily activities, while always following the Safe 6, plus one (wear a mask).

Anyone who is experiencing any of the following symptoms, is asked to self-isolate and arrange for testing immediately: 

  • Fever
  • Chills
  • Cough
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Shortness of breath
  • Runny nose
  • Sore throat
  • Loss of sense of taste or smell
  • Headache
  • Fatigue
  • Loss of appetite
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Muscle aches

The Government of Yukon encourages Yukoners to remain calm and continue to follow the Safe 6. Effective Tuesday, December 1, the Safe 6 gets a “plus one” as masks will be required in all indoor public places in Yukon.

November 27 – 20:08 – New COVID-19 cases confirmed

Yukon’s Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Brendan Hanley confirmed three new cases of COVID-19, bringing the territory’s total to 45 cases. There are currently 15 active cases in Yukon.

All three cases are in Whitehorse and all remain under investigation:

  • Case 43 and 44 are linked to a known case in Whitehorse.
  • Case 45 is linked to travel outside Yukon.

Additional public exposure notifications are being issued for:

  • Better Bodies
    • Sunday, November 1 to Wednesday, November 18, 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.
       
  • Canada Games Centre in the Wellness Room
    • Saturday, November 21, 11 a.m. to noon.  
       
  • Sakura Sushi
    • Friday, November 20, 5 p.m. to closing
       
  • Whitehorse Transit
    • Wednesday, November 18:
      • Route #2 from Copper Ridge to 2nd Avenue between the hours of 8 a.m. to 8:30 a.m.
      • Route #2 from 2nd Avenue to Copper ridge between 5 p.m. to 5:45 p.m.  
         
    • Thursday, November 19:
      • Route #2 from Copper Ridge to 2nd Avenue between the times of 2:30 p.m. and 3:30 p.m.  
      • Route #5 from 2nd Avenue to Range Road between 7:30 p.m. and 7:50 p.m.  
      • Route #2 from 2nd Avenue to Copper Ridge between 10 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. 

If you were in contact with anyone who was at one of the locations listed in the public exposure notices, you are a secondary contact and you do not need to self-isolate. Visit Yukon.ca for more information on self-isolation.

If you are not notified and do not have symptoms, you may continue with your usual daily activities. Remember to always follow the Safe 6 and we encourage you to wear a mask when required.

Anyone who is experiencing any of the following symptoms is asked to self-isolate and arrange for testing immediately:

  • Fever
  • Chills
  • Cough
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Shortness of breath
  • Runny nose
  • Sore throat
  • Loss of sense of taste or smell
  • Headache
  • Fatigue
  • Loss of appetite
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Muscle aches

If you are experiencing any symptoms and have been at these locations please call the COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre at 867-393-3083 to arrange for testing. Or drop in at the drive-thru testing centre located at Centennial Motors on the Alaska Highway across from the airport. You can also contact your rural community health centre. Due to a high volume of calls, you may be required to leave a number where you can be contacted. The COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre staff will return your call. If you do not receive a call within 24 hours please call back.

The Government of Yukon encourages Yukoners to remain calm and continue to follow the Safe 6 and wear a mask when required. Please be patient and kind to one another.

November 26 – 20:15 – New COVID-19 cases confirmed

Yukon’s Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Brendan Hanley confirmed three new cases of COVID-19, bringing the territory’s total to 42 cases. There are 6 new recoveries and 12 active cases in Yukon.

Two cases are in Whitehorse and the third is in a rural community: 

  • Case 40 is linked to a known case in Whitehorse.
  • Case 41 is linked to the Diwali festival in Whitehorse.
  • Case 42 is the rural case that is still under investigation but likely linked to exposure to one of the other known outbreaks in Whitehorse.

If you were at the Diwali festival on Saturday, November 14 and are experiencing any symptoms we recommend that you get tested immediately.

An additional public exposure notice is being issued for:

  • Save-On-Foods
    • Wednesday, November 18 between 10:30 a.m. and 12 p.m.

If you were in contact with anyone who was at one of the locations listed in the public exposure notices, you are a secondary contact and you do not need to self-isolate. Visit Yukon.ca for more information on self-isolation.

If you are not notified and do not have symptoms, you may continue with your usual daily activities. Remember to always follow the Safe 6 and we encourage you to wear a mask when required.

Anyone who is experiencing any of the following symptoms is asked to self-isolate and arrange for testing immediately: 

  • Fever
  • Chills
  • Cough
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Shortness of breath
  • Runny nose
  • Sore throat
  • Loss of sense of taste or smell
  • Headache
  • Fatigue
  • Loss of appetite
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Muscle aches

If you are experiencing any symptoms and have been at these locations please call the COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre at 867-393-3083 to arrange for testing. Or drop in at the drive-thru testing centre located at Centennial Motors on the Alaska Highway across from the airport. You can also contact your rural community health centre. Due to a high volume of calls, you may be required to leave a number where you can be contacted. The COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre staff will return your calls. If you do not receive a call within 24 hours please call back.

The Government of Yukon encourages Yukoners to remain calm and continue to follow the Safe 6 and wear a mask when required. Please be patient and kind to one another.

November 26 – 17:45 – Whitehorse COVID-19 screening drive-thru extended

Drive-thru testing will be extended for two weeks at the Centennial Motors wash bay location with further extension at a possible new location into 2021. Testing and contract tracing remain a critical part of the Government of Yukon’s management of COVD-19 in the territory. With a growing demand for testing, the Government of Yukon responded quickly to launch the new testing centre to increase testing capacity.

The first choice for a temporary drive-thru testing centre was a car wash facility. Centennial Motors first responded to the inquiry Friday, November 20, meeting the appropriate needs for testing. Allowing screening to begin the afternoon of Sunday, November 22.

As of Thursday morning, an average of 90 people per day have been tested. To meet the demand for testing, the drive-thru testing centre will be extended for an additional two weeks starting Sunday, November 29.

People who cannot access the drive-thru or want an in-clinic appointment can call the COVID-19 Testing Assessment Centre at 867-393-3083 in Whitehorse.

November 25 – 10:24 – Statement from Yukon’s Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Brendan Hanley regarding daycares

Yukon’s Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Brendan Hanley has issued the following statement.

We have received confirmation that an employee of a daycare in Whitehorse has tested positive for COVID-19. The employee is self-isolating and recovering well at home. Children who had contact with the employee have been contacted directly by Yukon Communicable Disease Control (YCDC) and instructed to self-isolate through the morning of December 1,2020. The owner has chosen to close the daycare until November 30, 2020.

I understand this is a time of heightened anxiety and fear, but you must trust that the Government of Yukon is taking the proper measures to protect all Yukoners. Anyone who has been at risk of exposure will be notified. If YCDC does not contact you, this means that you and your child are not considered to be at risk.

I encourage parents to keep their children in daycares. Please be patient, if you are not contacted there is no cause for concern. If you have any concerns please reach out to the COVID-19 information line or refer to Yukon.ca before removing your child from daycare.

If you are or your child is experiencing any symptoms of COVID-19, please contact the COVID-19 Testing and Assessment centre at 867-393-3083 in Whitehorse to arrange for testing.

November 24 – 11:05 – COVID-19 update

The Government of Yukon has the following updates for the Yukon public on measures being taken in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

COVID-19 cases and recoveries

As of today, November 24, at 9 a.m., the COVID-19 case count for Yukon is 38.  Twenty three people have recovered, one person has died, and there are currently 14 active cases. We have tested 4,624 people. Additional exposure notifications have been released.

  • Canadian Tire, Whitehorse
  • November 17, opening to close
     
  • Wykes Independent Grocer, Whitehorse
    • November 17, opening to close
       
  • Starbucks, Chilkoot Way, Whitehorse
    • November 12 to 18, opening to close
       
  • Tony’s, SKKY Hotel, Alaska Highway Whitehorse
    • November 14, 5 p.m. to close.
       
  • General Store in Dawson City
    •  November 15, opening to close
       
  • Air North
    • Flight 573, November 15
    • Flight 333  November 9
    • Flight 528  November 8
  • Air Canada
    • Flight 111 November 7

If you are experiencing any symptoms and have been at these locations please call the COVID 19 Testing and Assessment Centre (CTAC) to arrange for testing or drop in at the drive-thru testing centre located at Centennial Motors on the Alaska Highway across from the airport.

Clarity regarding public health notifications

Public health notifications are meant to alert Yukoners about potential exposures at locations during specific times and dates. However, a notification does not mean that an organization or business establishment has necessarily been closed or currently poses a public health concern.

Mandatory masks starting December 1

As of December 1, it will be mandatory to wear a non-medical mask in all indoor public spaces. This will extend to all Yukoners over the age of two with very limited exceptions. A list of places of exemption and people who will be granted exemption will be available on yukon.ca before December 1.

New self-isolation rules

If you are planning to have guests from outside of Yukon during the holidays, you must be aware of the new self-isolation rules. Self-isolation option one will allow you to share meals and hugs with your guests, however every member of your household will be required to self-isolate for the entire visit. If your guest leaves before 14 days, you must continue to self-isolate for three days. If everyone in your household and your departed guest do not have symptoms after three days, your household is free to leave your self-isolation.

Drive-Thru screening in Whitehorse

Located at the old Centennial Motors wash bay, this drive-thru will provide screening for those who are experiencing symptoms and require testing. Testing will be available from 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. until Saturday, November 28 2020.

COVID-19 Testing Centre

From Monday, November 16, to Sunday, November 22, we tested 296 people at the CTAC in Whitehorse.

Prepared to address positive cases within schools       

If there is a case connected to a student or staff at one of our schools, we will follow the advice and recommendations of Yukon’s Chief Medical Officer of Health and Yukon Communicable Disease Control. Learn more at yukon.ca

New Civil Emergency Measures Act charge

One new charge was laid on November 19 for failing to self-isolate.

Enforcement statistics

The Government of Yukon has received 1,043 complaints as of November 23:

  • Failure to self-isolate: 604
  • Gatherings over 10 inside or 50 outside: 27
  • Failure to transit through Yukon in 24 hours or stay on the designated route: 385
  • Businesses failing to comply with orders: 10
  • Failure to abide by a declaration form or not permitted entry into Yukon: 17
  • Other: 1

There have been a total of 26 people charged, and 21 people charged under the Civil Emergency Measures Act (CEMA).

A total of 63,229 travellers have come into Yukon:

  • Resident travellers: 16,555
  • BC residents: 15,081
  • NWT residents: 481
  • Other approved jurisdictions: 299
  • Non-residents staying: 10,147
  • Non-residents transiting: 20,561
  • Other: 299
  • Decals distributed indicating out-of-territory vehicles allowed in Yukon: 346

November 23 – 11:33 – Whitehorse COVID-19 screening drive-thru opens

A drive-thru COVID-19 screening service opened in Whitehorse on Sunday, November 22, 2020. The drive-thru is located at Centennial Motors, 91628 Alaska Highway, in the wash bay.

Drive-thru testing will help meet the increased demand for testing. It will be used for people with COVID-19 symptoms, providing an easier and more convenient way for them to get tested.

The service will be available for one week from 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., ending on Saturday, November 28, 2020. Screening needs will be assessed at the end of this week and the service will be extended if necessary.

Anyone who is experiencing any symptoms of COVID-19 should get tested. To arrange for testing, people should call the COVID-19 Testing Assessment Centre at 867-393-3083 in Whitehorse. If anyone cannot access the drive-thru or needs an appointment in a clinic, they should let the testing centre know during their call. Due to a high volume of calls, people may be required to leave a number. Staff will return calls within 24 hours.  

November 23 – 11:19 – new COVID-19 cases confirmed

Yukon’s Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Brendan Hanley confirmed six new cases of COVID-19, bringing the territory’s total to 38 cases. There are currently 14 active cases in Yukon.

Five of the new cases are linked to a previous case while one is still under investigation. Yukon Communicable Disease Control is reaching out to contacts.

These new cases represent three separate clusters.

Anyone who is experiencing any of the following symptoms, please self-isolate and arrange for testing immediately:

  • Fever
  • Chills
  • Cough
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Shortness of breath
  • Runny nose
  • Sore throat
  • Loss of sense of taste or smell
  • Headache
  • Fatigue
  • Loss of appetite
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Muscle aches

Anyone who has symptoms should self -isolate, take the online self-assessment, call 811, and arrange for testing at the COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre at 867-393-3083 or through their rural community health centre.

Due to a high volume of calls, people may be required to leave a number. The COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre staff will then return calls.  If you do not receive a call within 24 hours please call back.

November 21 – 17:50 – new COVID-19 cases confirmed

Yukon’s Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Brendan Hanley has confirmed three new cases of COVID-19, bringing the territory’s total to 32 cases.

Cases 30 and 31 have been linked to previous cases while case 32 is related to out-of-territory travel. The case investigation is underway and Yukon Communicable Disease Control (YCDC) is reaching out to contacts.

An additional public exposure notice is now issued for an already identified location:

  • Better Bodies, Whitehorse
    • Monday, November 16, between 5 a.m. and 7 a.m.

Anyone who’s experiencing the symptoms listed below and was at Better Bodies on that date should contact the COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre at 867-393-3083 in Whitehorse. Due to a high volume of calls, people may be required to leave a number. The COVID Testing and Assessment Centre staff will then return calls.

Anyone who has the following symptoms, should self-isolate and arrange for testing immediately:  

  • Fever
  • Chills
  • Cough
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Shortness of breath
  • Runny nose
  • Sore throat
  • Loss of sense of taste or smell
  • Headache
  • Fatigue
  • Loss of appetite
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Muscle aches

People who were at the other recently named exposure locations should also self-monitor for symptoms. This means watch for any of the symptoms listed above. If any symptoms occur, self-isolate and arrange for testing.

For community exposures such as this, it’s only necessary to self-isolate if symptoms occur. Someone who’s in contact with a person who was at the exposure locations is not required to self-isolate or to self-monitor.

Anyone who has symptoms but was not at a named location should self-isolate, take the online self-assessment, call 811 and arrange for testing at the COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre at 867-393-3083 or through their rural community health centre.

An up-to-date list of potential community exposures can be found here.

All Yukoners are reminded to self-isolate when they:

  • have symptoms;
  • have had a test and are waiting for results;
  • have returned to Yukon from travel outside the territory within the past 14 days; or
  • have been instructed to self-isolate by the Testing and Assessment Centre or their health care provider.

November 20 – 17:45 – new COVID-19 cases confirmed

Yukon Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Brendan Hanley confirmed three new cases of COVID-19, bringing the territory’s total to 29 cases.

Cases 27, 28 and 29 have been linked to previous cases. The case investigation is underway and Yukon Communicable Disease Control is reaching out to contacts.

An additional public exposure notice has been issued.

Anyone who is experiencing symptoms and has been at the following location should contact the COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre at 867-393-3083 in Whitehorse or contact the health centre in their community and say they were at the location.

  • Better Bodies, Whitehorse
    • Saturday, November 14 between 12 p.m. and 2:30 p.m.

If you experience any of the following symptoms arrange for testing immediately:  

  • Fever
  • Chills
  • Cough
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Shortness of breath
  • Runny nose
  • Sore throat
  • Loss of sense of taste or smell
  • Headache
  • Fatigue
  • Loss of appetite
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Muscle aches

November 18 – 19:28 – COVID-19 update

The Government of Yukon has the following updates for the Yukon public on measures being taken in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Expansion of self-isolation requirements

As of 5 p.m. on Friday, November 20, everyone other than critical services workers entering Yukon will be required to self-isolate for 14 days. This includes residents of British Columbia, the Northwest Territories and Nunavut.

Exceptions include residents of border areas such as Atlin, Lower Post, Fire Side, Jade City, Fraser and Pleasant Camp and those exercising an Aboriginal or treaty right for the time needed to exercise the right.

The government does not recommend non-essential travel outside the territory.

November 18 – 19:13 – COVID-19 public health notification issued for Whitehorse

Yukon Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Brendan Hanley confirmed a new case of COVID-19 in Whitehorse, bringing the territory’s total to 26 cases.

Investigation into the original source of exposure for this case is ongoing. Yukon Communicable Disease Control is leading this work and has been actively reaching out to all contacts.

Public exposure notices have been issued.

Anyone who has been at of the following locations and who develops symptoms should contact the COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre at 867-393-3083 in Whitehorse or contact the health centre in their community and say they were in one of these places.

  • Starbucks, Main Street, Whitehorse
    • Thursday, November 12 between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. 
    • Friday, November 13 between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. 
  • Starbucks, Chilkoot Way, Whitehorse
    • Saturday, November 14 between 6:30 p.m. and 8:30 p.m,
  • Better Bodies, Whitehorse 
    • Thursday, November 12 between 6:30 p.m. and closing
    • Friday, November 13 between 6:30 p.m. and closing  
  • Diwali Festival, 120 Copper Road Whitehorse on Saturday, November 14, between 3 p.m. and 6 p.m. 
  • Giorgio’s Cuccina, Whitehorse on Saturday, November 14, between 7 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. 
  • Tony’s Pasta and Seafood House in the SKKY hotel, on the Alaska Highway, Whitehorse on Saturday, November 14 between 7 p.m. and 9:30 p.m.

The symptoms that can occur with COVID-19 are:  

  • Fever
  • Chills
  • Cough
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Shortness of breath
  • Runny nose
  • Sore throat
  • Loss of sense of taste or smell
  • Headache
  • Fatigue
  • Loss of appetite
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Muscle aches

November 17 – 17:16 – COVID-19 update

The Government of Yukon has the following updates for the Yukon public on measures being taken in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

COVID-19 cases and recoveries

As of today, November 17, the COVID-19 case count for Yukon is 25. Twenty-two people have recovered and there are currently two active cases. A new case announced today is linked to a previous case. Yukoners are encouraged to check the latest public health notification.

We have tested 4,376 people for COVID-19 since the start of the pandemic.

COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre

From Monday, November 9, to Sunday, November 15, we tested 122 people at the COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre (CTAC) in Whitehorse.

Spread of misinformation       

Be patient and understanding and help reduce the spread of misinformation. If you hear information about COVID-19 in the territory, double check the facts by visiting Yukon.ca before telling others.

Long-term care homes

Residents in long-term care facilities are now allowed to have four people on their visitor list. Visitors are limited to two at a time and then only if they’re in the same social bubble.

Winter activity guidelines

Yukoners are reminded to follow the Safe 6 guidelines when they participate in outdoor winter activities. Winter activity guidelines will be available in the coming weeks on Yukon.ca.

New Civil Emergency Measures Act charges

Two new Civil Emergency Measures Act charges have been laid: one on November 12 and the other on November 15. Both charges were for failing to self-isolate.

Enforcement statistics

The Government of Yukon has received 1004 complaints as of November 16.

  • Failure to self-isolate: 575
  • Gatherings over 10 inside or 50 outside: 26
  • Failure to transit through Yukon in 24 hours or stay on the designated route: 376
  • Businesses failing to comply with orders: 10
  • Failure to abide by a declaration form or not permitted entry into Yukon: 17

A total of 20 people have been charged and 25 charges have been laid under the Civil Emergency Measures Act (CEMA).

A total of 61,685 travellers have come into Yukon:

  • Resident travellers: 15,836
  • BC residents: 14,527
  • NWT residents: 464
  • Other approved jurisdictions: 266
  • Non-residents staying: 10,063
  • Non-residents transiting: 20,268
  • Other: 97
  • Decals distributed indicating out-of-territory vehicles allowed in Yukon: 341

November 17 – 17:09 – COVID-19 public health notification issued for Whitehorse

Yukon Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Brendan Hanley confirmed a new case of COVID-19, bringing the territory’s total to 25 cases.

This additional case is linked to a previous case. The case investigation is underway and Yukon Communicable Disease Control has reached most of the contacts. An additional public exposure notice has been identified.

Anyone who has been at any of the following locations and who develops symptoms should contact the COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre 867-393-3083 in Whitehorse, or contact the community health centre in their community and say they were in these places.

Listers Motor Sports, Whitehorse, between 8:30 a.m. and noon on Tuesday, November 10
A&W restaurant, Whitehorse, between 3 p.m and 6:30 p.m. on Sunday, November 8
Save-On-Foods, Whitehorse, before 1 p.m. on Friday, November 6

The symptoms that can occur with COVID-19 are:  

  • Fever
  • Chills
  • Cough
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Shortness of breath
  • Runny nose
  • Sore throat
  • Loss of sense of taste or smell
  • Headache
  • Fatigue
  • Loss of appetite
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Muscle aches

November 12 – 13:16 – COVID-19 public health notifications issued for Whitehorse

Yukon Deputy Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Catherine Elliott today confirmed a new case of COVID-19, bringing the territory’s total to 24 cases since the first infection was announced on March 22, 2020.

The case investigation is underway and the Yukon Communicable Disease Centre has reached most of the contacts.

People who have been at the following locations and who have symptoms are asked to get tested.

  • Save-On-Foods, Whitehorse, before 1 p.m. on November 6
  • A&W restaurant, Whitehorse, between 3 to 6:30 p.m. on November 8

Anyone who was at these locations during these periods who develops symptoms should contact the COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre at 867-393-3083 in Whitehorse, or contact their nearest community health centre and state their connection to their notification.

We all contribute to a healthy community by continuing to follow the Safe 6, staying home and away from others when sick, keeping our hands clean and maintaining a respectful distance from others.

Anyone with symptoms, even mild, should seek testing and can use the self-assessment tool at Yukon.ca as a guide or call 811.

The symptoms that can occur with COVID-19 are:  

  • Fever
  • Chills
  • Cough
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Shortness of breath
  • Runny nose
  • Sore throat
  • Loss of sense of taste or smell
  • Headache
  • Fatigue
  • Loss of appetite
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Muscle aches

November 10 – 09:22 – COVID-19 update

The Government of Yukon has the following updates for the Yukon public on measures being taken in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

COVID-19 cases and recoveries

As of today, November 10, at 9 a.m., the COVID-19 case count for Yukon is 23. Twenty-one people have recovered and there is currently one active case.

COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre

From Monday November 2, to Sunday, November 8, we tested 89 people at the COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre in Whitehorse. To date, we have tested 4,197 people. The centre will be open on Wednesday, November 11.

Updates to school guidelines  

The school health and safety guidelines for Grades K to 12 have been updated to reduce the requirement for two-metre distancing between students in the classroom and to make masks mandatory in common areas outside of the classroom. This is intended to provide clarity for all schools.  

New travel guidance for southern BC

British Columbia's Provincial Health Officer announced new orders this weekend. Yukoners travelling to or from BC will need to follow COVID-19 guidelines and abide by the order while they're in BC.

The Government of Yukon is monitoring BC developments and will adjust its guidelines and advice as needed based on the recommendations of Yukon’s Chief Medical Officer of Health.

Holiday travel planning

Yukoners who are hosting family this holiday season will need to prepare to self-isolate if they have visitors from outside BC, the NWT or Nunavut. Travellers not from the NWT, Nunavut and BC need to self-isolate with their household for the duration of their stay.

New Civil Emergency Measures Act charges

One charge was laid on November 5 for failure to transit through Yukon.

Enforcement statistics

The Government of Yukon has received 990 complaints as of November 9, 2020:

  • Failure to self-isolate: 565
  • Gatherings over 10 inside or 50 outside: 26
  • Failure to transit through Yukon in 24 hours or stay on the designated route: 374
  • Businesses failing to comply with orders: 10
  • Failure to abide by a declaration form or not permitted entry into Yukon: 15

There have been a total of 18 people charged, and 23 charges laid under the Civil Emergency Measures Act (CEMA).

A total of 59,826 travellers have come into Yukon:

  • Resident travellers: 14,937
  • BC residents: 13,887
  • NWT residents: 443
  • Other approved jurisdictions: 245
  • Non-residents staying: 9,961
  • Non-residents transiting: 20,268
  • Other: 95
  • Decals distributed indicating out-of-territory vehicles allowed in Yukon: 338

November 4 – 11:13 – COVID-19 update

The Government of Yukon has the following updates for the Yukon public on measures being taken in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

COVID-19 cases and recoveries

As of today, November 4, at 11 a.m., the COVID-19 case count for Yukon is 23. Twenty people have recovered and there are currently two active cases. Contact tracing remains underway.

COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre

From Tuesday, October 27, to Monday, November 2, we tested 114 people at the COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre in Whitehorse. To date, we have tested 4,114 people.

Remembrance Day 

Yukoners are encouraged to honour our veterans virtually this year. To reduce risks from COVID-19 the Whitehorse Legion Branch is broadcasting a Remembrance Day Ceremony live on its Facebook.

Two new Civil Emergency Measures Act charges

Two people have been charged with not following self-isolation requirements. One person was charged on October 28 and another person was charged on November 2.  Both are Yukon residents who travelled outside of Yukon, BC, the NWT and Nunavut within the previous 14 days.

Enforcement statistics

The Government of Yukon has received 971 complaints as of November 2:

  • Failure to self-isolate: 551
  • Gatherings over 10 inside or 50 outside: 26
  • Failure to transit through Yukon in 24 hours or stay on the designated route: 370
  • Businesses failing to comply with orders: 10
  • Failure to abide by a declaration form or not permitted entry into Yukon: 14
  • Other: 1

There have been a total of 17 people charged, and 22 charges laid under the Civil Emergency Measures Act (CEMA).

A total of 58,364 travellers have come into Yukon:

  • Resident travellers: 14,351
  • BC residents: 13,305
  • NWT residents: 422
  • Other approved jurisdictions: 194
  • Non-residents staying: 9,872
  • Non-residents transiting: 20,128
  • Other: 92
  • Decals distributed indicating out-of-territory vehicles allowed in Yukon: 335

October 30 – 11:44 – First COVID-19-related death in Yukon

Yukon Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Brendan Hanley has confirmed the death of one of the five people recently diagnosed with COVID-19 in Watson Lake.

The person passed away at home on October 29 while they were in self-isolation. A Coroner’s investigation has concluded that their death was caused by COVID-19 infection.

The person who has died was older and had underlying medical conditions.

The level of COVID-19 risk to residents of Watson Lake and other Yukoners has not changed as a result of this death.

October 29 – 14:57 – Yukon’s COVID-19 case count rises to 23

One new case of COVID-19 was confirmed today by Yukon’s Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Brendan Hanley. This is the territory’s 23rd case of COVID-19 infection and is not linked to the Watson Lake cluster.

Laboratory results confirmed the positive diagnosis on the night of Wednesday, October 28. Yukon Communicable Disease Control (YCDC) staff has completed contact tracing and there is no risk of public exposure.

Because they had travelled as well as having a contact history the person was already self-isolating and is recovering well at home. The new case was identified through contact tracing and is linked to travel-related cases previously reported in Whitehorse.

As a reminder, anyone who develops symptoms, regardless of how mild, should self-isolate immediately and arrange for testing. As always, anyone seeking urgent medical care should go to emergency departments and community health centres.

October 28 – 11:07 – COVID-19 update

The Government of Yukon has the following updates for the Yukon public on measures being taken in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

COVID-19 cases and recoveries

As of today, October 28, at 11 a.m., the COVID-19 case count for Yukon is 22. Seventeen people have recovered and there are currently five active cases, and all individuals are recovering. Contact tracing remains underway. All Watson Lake residents who are experiencing symptoms and were present at the advised locations, are urged to arrange for testing at the Watson Lake Community Hospital immediately.

Public exposure notice:

  • Watson Lake Foods – Super A – October 8 and October 16
  • Home Hardware – October 7 and October 10
  • Big Horn Motel – October 7 through 9 and October 13 through 20

COVID-19 testing centre

From Tuesday, October 19, to Monday, October 26, we tested 120 people at the COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre (CTAC) in Whitehorse. To date, we have tested 3,934 people.

Reporting public concerns

Be kind and understanding. People in transit through the territory are now driving in winter conditions. Report concerns to covid19info@gov.yk.ca or phone 1-877-374-0425, and avoid direct actions when suspecting someone is not following measures.

Halloween

Yukoners are reminded to take the appropriate measures this Halloween. Refrain from participating in any large gatherings over 10 people. Refer to COVID-19 Halloween guidelines to ensure you are taking precautions while trick-or-treating or handing out candy.

Traffic stoplight guidelines

If you're feeling ill, consult the traffic light guidelines, which advise how to monitor your symptoms and when it is appropriate to seek out testing and when you can resume regular activities. 

New Civil Emergency Measures Act charge

One charge was laid on October 25 for a Yukon resident who travelled outside of Yukon, BC, the NWT and Nunavut within the previous 14 days and did not following self-isolation requirements.

Canada and US border

Canada and the US have continued to extend the border closures to non-essential travel until November 21. Yukoners can find more information about what is considered essential travel here.

Enforcement statistics

The Government of Yukon has received 950 complaints as of October 26:

  • Failure to self-isolate: 525
  • Gatherings over 10 inside or 50 outside: 26
  • Failure to transit through Yukon in 24 hours or stay on the designated route: 365
  • Businesses failing to comply with orders: 10
  • Failure to abide by a declaration form or not permitted entry into Yukon: 14
  • Other: 1

There have been a total of 15 people charged, and 20 charges laid under the Civil Emergency Measures Act (CEMA).

A total of 56,837 travellers have come into Yukon:

  • Resident travellers: 13,687
  • BC residents: 12,784
  • NWT residents: 402
  • Other approved jurisdictions: 178
  • Non-residents staying: 9,768
  • Non-residents transiting: 19,930
  • Other: 88
  • Decals distributed indicating out-of-territory vehicles allowed in Yukon: 330

October 26 – 16:30 – Watson Lake COVID-19 cluster is now at 5

Yukon’s Chief Medical Officer of Health, Dr. Brendan Hanley today confirmed 2 additional cases of COVID-19, bringing the territory’s total to 22 cases since the 1st case was announced on March 22, 2020.

These 2 new cases are associated with the recent exposures in Watson Lake. Both people had not recently travelled and are from the same household which has confirmed direct exposures. A source of origin is still being investigated and contact tracing is actively underway. The 2 people are currently doing well and self-isolating at home.

People who were at the following locations on the following dates are urged to arrange for testing at Watson Lake Community Hospital immediately:

  • Watson Lake Foods – Super A – October 8 and October 16
  • Home Hardware – October 7 and October 10
  • Big Horn Motel – October 7 through  9 and 13 through 16

Watson Lake residents who have any symptoms, even mild, are urged to seek out testing.

The symptoms to watch for are:  

  • fever/chills;
  • cough;
  • difficulty breathing;
  • shortness of breath;
  • runny nose;
  • sore throat;
  • loss of sense of taste or smell;
  • headache;
  • fatigue;
  • loss of appetite;
  • nausea and vomiting;
  • diarrhea; and
  • muscle aches.

October 23 – 17:25 – COVID-19 public health notifications issued for Watson Lake

Yukon Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Brendan Hanley today confirmed three additional cases of COVID-19, bringing the territory’s total to 20 cases since the first infection was announced on March 22, 2020.

A source of origin is still being investigated and contact tracing is actively underway.

This is the fourth incidence of infection in a rural community since COVID-19 was reported in Yukon.

The community is being identified because of possible cases of exposure at three locations in Watson Lake.

  • Watson Lake Foods – Super A – October 8 and October 16
  • Home Hardware – October 7 and October 10
  • Big Horn Motel – October 7 through 9 and 13 through 16

People from Watson Lake who were in these locations and have symptoms should contact the Watson Lake Community Hospital at 867-536-4444 to arrange for testing.

Other Yukoners who may have been in these locations and who are experiencing symptoms should contact the COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre at 867-393-3083 in Whitehorse or the community health centre in their community.

Anyone with symptoms, even mild, should seek out testing and can use the self-assessment tool at Yukon.ca as a guide or call 811.

The symptoms to watch for are: 

  • Fever/chills
  • Cough
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Shortness of breath
  • Runny nose
  • Sore throat
  • Loss of sense of taste or smell
  • Headache
  • Fatigue
  • Loss of appetite
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Muscle aches

October 21 – 11:08 – COVID-19 update

The Government of Yukon has the following updates for the Yukon public on measures being taken in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

COVID-19 cases and recoveries

As of today, October 21, at 11 a.m., the COVID-19 case count for Yukon is 17. Fifteen people have recovered and there are currently two active cases, with both people in self-isolation and recovering at home. We have tested 3,814 people.

COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre

From Tuesday, October 13, to Monday, October 19, we tested 100 people at the COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre (CTAC) in Whitehorse.

Reporting public concerns

Be kind and understanding. People in transit through the territory are now driving in winter conditions. Report concerns to covid19info@gov.yk.ca or phone 1-877-374-0425, and avoid direct actions when suspecting someone is not following measures.

Flu clinics

Yukon’s influenza vaccine has been available since Monday, October 19, with the first week aimed at those more vulnerable to complications from influenza. These include Yukon residents with chronic medical conditions, as well as those over 65, pregnant women, and young children.

Vaccines will be available for the general public as of Monday, October 26. Due to COVID-19, clinics will have been rearranged to ensure proper safety precautions are taken. In addition, certain pharmacists within Whitehorse are offering flu shots by appointment this year.

Gatherings and social bubbles 

All Yukoners are reminded to adhere to Yukon’s guidance on gatherings and keep social groups small and intimate. Your social bubble can include 15 people but you should not socialize with more than 10 at a time indoors. If you gather with anyone who is not in your social bubble, you must keep a two-metre (six feet) distance from them at all times. Organized and seated gatherings have higher limits, as long as all precautions are observed. See Yukon.ca for more details. 

New Civil Emergency Measures Act charge

One charge was laid on October 19 for a Yukon residents who travelled outside of Yukon, BC, NWT and Nunavut within the previous 14 days and did not following self-isolation requirements.

Canada and US border

Canada and the US has continued to extend the border closures to non-essential travel until November 21. Yukoners can find more information about what is considered essential travel here.

Enforcement statistics

The Government of Yukon has received 930 complaints as of October 18:

  • Failure to self-isolate: 523
  • Gatherings over 10 inside or 50 outside: 25
  • Failure to transit through Yukon in 24 hours or stay on the designated route: 359
  • Businesses failing to comply with orders: 10
  • Failure to abide by a declaration form or not permitted entry into Yukon: 13
  • Other: 1

There have been a total of 14 people charged, and 19 charges laid under the Civil Emergency Measures Act (CEMA).

A total of 55,130 travellers have come into Yukon:

  • Resident travellers: 12,860
  • BC residents: 12,215
  • NWT residents: 385
  • Other approved jurisdictions: 167
  • Non-residents staying: 9,690
  • Non-residents transiting: 19,728
  • Other: 785
  • Decals distributed indicating out-of-territory vehicles allowed in Yukon: 322

October 14 – 12:20 – COVID-19 update

The Government of Yukon has the following updates for the Yukon public on measures underway in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

COVID-19 cases and recoveries

As of today, October 14, at 11 a.m., the COVID-19 case count for Yukon is 15. Everyone has recovered. We have tested 3,635 people.

COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre

From Tuesday, October 6, to Monday, October 12, we tested 93 people at the COVID-19 Testing Centre (CTC) in Whitehorse.

Update on previously announced probable case

On Saturday, October 10, we announced a probable case of COVID-19, following tests using the Genexpert analyzer. Confirmatory testing resulted in a negative final result. It is important to remember that contacts are notified through Yukon Communicable Disease Control or Community Nursing. Protection of personal health information is of utmost importance.

Reviewing the state of emergency declaration

The Government of Yukon regularly evaluates the need for the state of emergency and ministerial orders issued under CEMA and may repeal any that are no longer necessary to the current pandemic situation.

The state of emergency and accompanying orders enable the government to adapt and respond rapidly to the pandemic and keep pace with developments across Canada, with the aim to minimize risk and help Yukoners to manage through uncertainty. The state of emergency was extended on September 9 and is valid for up to 90 days.

Land border update

Land border traveller numbers continue to decline as the winter season approaches. Since October 2 there have been 102 self-declaration forms completed at land borders.

The total number of people recorded travelling to Yukon since October 2 is 3,282. This includes residents of Yukon, people transiting through and people entering the territory who are not Yukon residents.

Enforcement statistics

The Government of Yukon has received 911 complaints:

  • Failure to self-isolate: 509
  • Gatherings over 10 inside or 50 outside: 24
  • Failure to transit through Yukon in 24 hours or stay on the designated route: 354
  • Businesses failing to comply with orders: 10
  • Failure to abide by a declaration form or not permitted entry into Yukon: 13
  • Other: 1

There have been a total of 13 people charged, and 18 charges laid under the Civil Emergency Measures Act (CEMA).

A total of 53,436 travellers have come into Yukon:

  • Resident travellers: 12,032
  • BC residents: 11,759
  • NWT residents: 354
  • Other approved jurisdictions: 129
  • Non-residents staying: 9,586
  • Non-residents transiting: 19,498
  • Other: 78
  • Decals distributed indicating out-of-territory vehicles allowed in Yukon: 398

October 10 – 17:35 – New probable case of COVID-19 in Yukon announced 

Yukon’s Chief Medical Officer of Health, Dr. Brendan Hanley has announced a probable case of COVID-19 in Yukon. Yukon Communicable Disease Control (YCDC) is awaiting confirmation from the BC Centre for Disease Control.

The individual is from Whitehorse, and received care through the Whitehorse General Hospital Emergency Department. The person is currently stable and safely self-isolating. The case is linked to travel outside of Yukon. Initial testing was undertaken using the Genexpert rapid test. A subsequent test was sent to BC for confirmation.  

YCDC has begun contact tracing and investigation. To date, no public exposure has been identified. Anyone who may have been in contact with this person will be contacted by YCDC and directed on next steps to take.  

October 7 – 11:28 – COVID-19 update

The Government of Yukon has the following updates for the Yukon public on measures being taken in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

COVID-19 cases and recoveries

As of today, October 7, at 11 a.m., the COVID-19 case count for Yukon is 15. Everyone has recovered. We have tested 3,542 people.

COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre

From Tuesday, September 29, to Monday, October 5, we tested 108 people at the COVID-19 Testing and Assessment Centre (CTAC) in Whitehorse.

COVID alert app 

We are reviewing the current benefits and limitations of the Government of Canada’s COVID Alert app within the territory and how it is working in other jurisdictions.

The app uses Bluetooth to communicate with other devices when in close range. If your phone has been in the same location as a person diagnosed with COVID-19 who uses the app and has uploaded that information, you are anonymously advised of a possible exposure.

Yukoners who have downloaded the app and travelled outside Yukon should contact Yukon Communicable Disease Control (YCDC) for follow up if they receive an alert on their device.

New testing options 

A new swish and spit, or gargle, COVID-19 test developed in BC may be used within Yukon in the near future. This test does not require a nasal swab and the gargle option is particularly useful for children.

Another tool under review is the Abbott ID NOW test, which is a portable rapid molecular test that can provide results within 15 minutes. This test was approved by Health Canada and Yukon anticipates receiving an allotment of 10 machines. More information on how the machines will be deployed will be provided as analysis proceeds.

Thanksgiving

Stay outside for gatherings as much as possible. You can gather with up to 50 people outside if you maintain physical distancing. Avoid hosting or attending any gathering if you are feeling unwell even if your symptoms are mild. Though your social bubble can include up to 15 people, indoor gatherings are limited to 10 people. If you are eating together, have a designated carver and server to limit spreading germs. Avoid sharing common items like glasses, cutlery, snack bowls and salt or pepper shakers. Set your table and chairs for physical distancing between people from different bubbles.

Always follow the Safe 6. Avoid closed spaces, crowds and close contact.

Enforcement statistics

The Government of Yukon has received 887 complaints:

  • Failure to self-isolate: 496
  • Gatherings over 10 inside or 50 outside: 24
  • Failure to transit through Yukon in 24 hours or stay on the designated route: 343
  • Businesses failing to comply with orders: 10
  • Failure to abide by a declaration form or not permitted entry into Yukon: 13
  • Other: 1

There have been a total of 13 people charged and 18 charges laid under the Civil Emergency Measures Act (CEMA).

A total of 51,469 travellers have come into Yukon:

  • Resident travellers: 11,232
  • BC residents: 11,148
  • NWT residents: 336
  • Other approved jurisdictions: 90
  • Non-residents staying: 9,444
  • Non-residents transiting: 19,146
  • Other: 73
  • Decals distributed indicating out-of-territory vehicles allowed in Yukon: 300

September 30 – 14:35 – COVID-19 update

The Government of Yukon has the following updates for the Yukon public on measures being taken in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

COVID-19 cases and recoveries

As of today, September 30, at 2 p.m., the COVID-19 case count for Yukon is 15. Everyone has recovered. We have tested 3,402 people.

COVID-19 Testing Centre

From Tuesday, September 22, to Monday, September 28, we tested 157 people at the COVID-19 Testing Centre (CTC) in Whitehorse.

The Respiratory Assessment Centre has been renamed the COVID-19 Testing Centre. Hours of operation are 8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m., Monday through Sunday.  Referrals are no longer required for a COVID-19 test at the CTC.

Road border schedule change for on-site personnel

On-site road border personnel are transitioning from the current 24-hours a day schedule to 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. at the Alaska Highway and Junction 37 borders beginning October 1.

Travellers arriving outside of these hours will be required to sign a declaration and submit their self-isolation plan, along with a contact number when arriving from outside of BC, NWT or Nunavut. There will be on-site kiosks for completing the self-declaration, which is required by law.

 The COVID-19 information station on the Alaska Highway in Whitehorse will also be closing as of 6 p.m. today. These changes reflect reduced road traffic as the winter season approaches.

Process for public notifications regarding active cases

Once Yukon Communicable Disease Control (YCDC) receives notification of a positive result of COVID-19 they then begin the process of contract tracing. This process involves speaking with the patient, family and close contacts to determine level of risk of exposure. 

Yukon Communicable Disease only contacts people who are identified as contacts. Public notifications are only issued when YCDC is not able to identify all those who may have come into contact with an infected person.

Guidance for Halloween and Thanksgiving

The Chief Medical Officer of Health is encouraging Halloween to take place. Children should wear a non-medical mask or face covering, or consider a Halloween themed cloth mask; they should trick or treat in their consistent social bubble; not gather on doorsteps, and use a prop like a broom or a sword to ring doorbells.

Those who are distributing candy should use a tool to offer treats, such as tongs or a hockey stick. Only distribute wrapped store bought candy. Please do not leave treats in a communal bucket.

More information will be available on Yukon.ca.

Singing and music performances

We know there is risk associated with these activities and we have tools to manage that risk.

  • Keep a minimum of two metres between singers and musicians at all times.
  • Face forward while singing or playing instruments (not in a circle or facing each other).
  • Conductors should maintain four metres from the choir or orchestra or wear a face shield and maintain two metres’ distance.
  • Performers should maintain four metres from the audience or be separated by plexiglas or similar barrier.
  • Rehearsals are recommended to be 30 minutes or less.
  • Ensure good ventilation where you are practicing, space out in the room you are playing or singing in, open the window, practice outside if you can
  • Regular cleaning of instruments, mouthpieces, music stands, drum sticks and other accessories is essential.
  • Do not share cleaning cloths, instrument brushes or microphones.

Read the singing and music guidelines.  

New charges under the Civil Emergency Measures Act

Below is a summary of the charges laid on September 29. We do not provide any information that may identify anyone such as their name, where they received the charge or their contact information.

One individual was charged with the following:

Failure to provide a declaration.
Failure to comply with the self-isolation order.

Enforcement statistics

The Government of Yukon has received 857 complaints:

  • Failure to self-isolate: 478
  • Social gatherings over 10 inside or 50 outside: 24
  • Failure to transit through Yukon in 24 hours or stay on the designated route: 331
  • Businesses failing to comply with Orders: 10
  • Failure to abide by a declaration form or not permitted entry into Yukon: 13
  • Other: 1

There have been a total of 12 people charged, and 17 charges laid under the Civil Emergency Measures Act (CEMA).

A total of 50,510 travellers have come into Yukon:

  • Resident travellers: 10,705
  • BC residents: 10,601
  • NWT residents: 303
  • Other approved jurisdictions: 676
  • Non-residents staying: 9,350
  • Non-residents transiting: 18,805
  • Other: 70
  • Decals distributed indicating out-of-territory vehicles allowed in Yukon: 291

September 26 – 9:01 – Non resident tests positive for COVID-19 while in Yukon

An out of territory resident has tested positive for COVID-19. The person has been hospitalized in Whitehorse and they are in a stable condition.

Contact tracing is well under way and all close contacts in Yukon have been contacted by public health officials.

Quick facts 

  • Based on the risk assessment by Yukon Communicable Disease Control, the public health risk associated with this case is low.
  • As this person is not a resident of Yukon, this case will not be included in Yukon’s case count.
  • Visit yukon.ca/covid-19 for the latest information.
  • For non-medical questions, email covid19info@gov.yk.ca or phone 1-877-374-0425.
  • For medical questions or if you feel ill, phone 811 or launch the COVID-19 self-assessment tool.

September 23 – 14:15 – COVID-19 update

The Government of Yukon has the following updates for the Yukon public on measures being taken in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

COVID-19 cases and recoveries

As of today, September 23, at 2 p.m., the COVID-19 case count for Yukon is 15. Everyone has recovered. We have tested 3,211 people.

Respiratory Assessment Centre

From Wednesday, September 16, to Tuesday, September 22, we tested 98 people at the Respiratory Assessment Centre in Whitehorse.

The Respiratory Assessment Centre will now be known as the COVID testing centre (CTC). Hours of operation are 8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m., Monday through Sunday.  Referrals are no longer required for COVID 19 test at the CTC.

New charges under the Civil Emergency Measures Act

Below is a summary of charges laid on September 17 and September 23. We do not provide any information that may identify anyone, such as their name, where they received the charge or their contact information.

  • One charge laid on September 17:
    • failure to comply with the self-isolation order.
  • Two charges laid on September 23:
    • Two failures to comply with indoor gathering of 10 people or fewer.

Stop light symptom criteria for staying home from schools and daycares

We have updated guidance based on three colour zones (green, yellow and red) to help parents and guardians know when to keep children home from school or daycare. The school posters is available on line and the daycare poster will be up by the end of day.

Flu clinics to begin in mid-October

Flu clinics throughout Yukon will begin the week of October 19 for individuals considered as high risk or with a chronic disease. The clinic will open to the general public on October 26. This year, the Yukon Convention Centre will be used for all Whitehorse flu clinics. The clinic will be open six days a week initially with extended hours, form 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Further details will be released in early October.

Enforcement statistics

September 30, 2020: Please note that we have added a clarification to the "Other approved jurisdictions" category below.

The Government of Yukon has received 832 complaints:

  • Failure to self-isolate: 466
  • Social gatherings over 10 inside or 50 outside: 23
  • Failure to transit through Yukon in 24 hours or stay on the designated route: 321
  • Businesses failing to comply with Orders: 9
  • Failure to abide by a declaration form or not permitted entry into Yukon: 12
  • Other: 1

There have been a total of 11 people charged, and 15 charges laid under the Civil Emergency Measures Act (CEMA).

A total of 48,107 travellers have come into Yukon:

  • Resident travellers: 10,060
  • BC residents: 9,601
  • NWT residents: 265
  • Other approved jurisdictions: 652*
  • Non-residents staying: 9,196
  • Non-residents transiting: 18,270
  • Other: 63
  • Decals distributed indicating out-of-territory vehicles allowed in Yukon: 269

* Due to the fact that the way we’ve collected traveller data has changed since we started collecting statistics, the "Other approved jurisdictions" category has been used to categorize travellers that did not fall into an existing category. We’re reviewing how we collect and categorize statistics to maintain accuracy, and will make adjustments as necessary.

September 16, 2020 – COVID-19 update

The Government of Yukon has the following updates for the Yukon public on measures being taken in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

COVID-19 cases and recoveries

As of today, September 16, at 2 p.m., the COVID-19 case count for Yukon is 15. Everyone has recovered. We have tested 3,020 people.

Respiratory Assessment Centre

From Wednesday, September 9, to Tuesday, September 16, we tested 129 people at the Respiratory Assessment Centre in Whitehorse.

Symptom criteria for staying home from schools and daycares

We have developed guidance based on three colour zones to help parents and guardians know when to keep children home from school or daycare.

(Since issuing the September 16, 2020, information bulletin, we've put more detailed guidance online about when people can send their children to school than we originally included here.)

Six new charges under the Civil Emergency Measures Act

Six new charges were laid under the Civil Emergency Measures Act on September 11 and September 15.

Two charges were laid on September 11:

  • failure to self-isolate; and
  • failure to transit through Yukon.

Four charges were laid on Sept 15:

  • two failures to self-isolate; and
  • two failures to behave in a manner consistent with the declaration.

We will not provide information that may identify anyone, such as their name or where they received the charge.

Reminder about isolation requirements

Travellers who are required to self-isolate must complete their entire 14-day isolation when they arrive back in Yukon. This includes people who spent time in BC, the NWT or Nunavut after they travelled from other regions of Canada or internationally. The entire 14-day isolation must happen after people arrive in Yukon.

People must also be reachable at the phone number and address they’ve provided on their declaration form throughout their period of self-isolation. They may receive a spot check call from the Government of Yukon. These spot check calls are separate from the Public Health Agency of Canada checks that are for people who have been outside the country.

Enforcement statistics

September 30, 2020: Please note that we have added a clarification to the "Other approved jurisdictions" category below.

The Government of Yukon has received 795 complaints:

  • Failure to self-isolate: 441
  • Social gatherings over 10 inside or 50 outside: 23
  • Failure to transit through Yukon in 24 hours or stay on the designated route: 308
  • Businesses failing to comply with Orders: 8
  • Failure to abide by a declaration form or not permitted entry into Yukon: 13
  • Other: 2

There have been 12 charges in total laid under the Civil Emergency Measures Act (CEMA).

A total of 45,685 travellers have come into Yukon:

Resident travellers: 9,379

  • BC residents: 8,615
  • NWT residents: 257
  • Other approved jurisdictions: 623*
  • Non-residents staying: 8,999
  • Non-residents transiting: 17,764
  • Other: 48
  • Decals distributed indicating out-of-territory vehicles allowed in Yukon: 261

* Due to the fact that the way we’ve collected traveller data has changed since we started collecting statistics, the "Other approved jurisdictions" category has been used to categorize travellers that did not fall into an existing category. We’re reviewing how we collect and categorize statistics to maintain accuracy, and will make adjustments as necessary.

September 2, 2020 – COVID-19 update

The Government of Yukon has the following updates for the Yukon public on measures being taken in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

COVID-19 cases and recoveries

As of today, September 2, at 2 p.m., the COVID-19 case count for Yukon is 15. Everyone has recovered. We have tested 2,643 people.

Respiratory Assessment Centre

From Wednesday, August 27, to Tuesday, September 1, we tested 109 people at the Respiratory Assessment Centre in Whitehorse.

Yukon Business Relief Program

This Yukon Business Relief Program will continue in partnership with CanNor’s Northern Business Relief Fund. Businesses can apply for support for both or either of these programs through the Government of Yukon.

Community Wellbeing Survey

The territory-wide Community Wellbeing Survey is closing on September 6. The results of the survey will provide a territory-wide snapshot of Yukoners’ wellbeing and generate needed data to support informed decision making. The COVID-specific questions at the start of the survey will be used to inform next steps in the pandemic response. Visit yukon.ca for more information.

International border reminder

Yukoners are reminded that if you choose to go past the Canadian border station at Fraser or Beaver Creek, you must be aware of the federal rules for re-entering Canada at the time of your departure. If you cross into Alaska, you will be subject to these federal rules, which include a mandatory 14-day quarantine. These rules are applied equally at all official border crossings (and points of international arrivals) across Canada, and you must follow the directions given to you by the CBSA and the Public Health Agency of Canada.

The federal requirements are separate from our own territorial border measures. For example, as a Yukoner, you are required to self-isolate if you've travelled outside of Yukon, British Columbia, NWT, or Nunavut in the 14 days before you re-enter the territory.

For more information:

www.cbsa-asfc.gc.ca/services/covid/canadians-canadiens-eng.html

yukon.ca/information-self-isolation

Yukoners encouraged to remain vigilant

Although there are no confirmed active cases in the territory, Yukoners are encouraged to remain vigilant and continue following the Safe Six:

  • Wash your hands frequently with soap and water or use hand sanitizer with at least 60 per cent alcohol.
  • Stay home if you're feeling sick.
  • Remember to keep two metres (six feet) between yourself and people who are not in your social bubble.
  • Limit travel to rural communities and be respectful when you’re there.
  • Self-isolate if you’ve:
    • just returned to Yukon and have been outside of British Columbia, Nunavut or Northwest Territories in the last 14 days; or
    • been in contact with someone diagnosed with COVID-19.

Enforcement statistics

September 30, 2020: Please note that we have added a clarification to the "Other approved jurisdictions" category below.

The Government of Yukon has received 726 complaints:

  • Failure to self-isolate: 401
  • Social gatherings over 10 inside or 50 outside: 22
  • Failure to transit through Yukon in 24 hours or stay on the designated route: 283
  • Businesses failing to comply with Orders: 7
  • Failure to abide by a declaration form or not permitted entry into Yukon: 11
  • Other: 2

There have been six charges laid under the Civil Emergency Measures Act (CEMA).

A total of 40,070 travellers have come into Yukon:

  • Resident travellers: 7,710
  • BC residents: 6,375
  • NWT residents: 194
  • Other approved jurisdictions: 518*
  • Non-residents staying: 8,562
  • Non-residents transiting: 16,673
  • Other: 38
  • Decals distributed indicating out-of-territory vehicles allowed in Yukon: 243

* Due to the fact that the way we’ve collected traveller data has changed since we started collecting statistics, the "Other approved jurisdictions" category has been used to categorize travellers that did not fall into an existing category. We’re reviewing how we collect and categorize statistics to maintain accuracy, and will make adjustments as necessary.

August 26, 2020 – COVID-19 update

The Government of Yukon has the following updates for the Yukon public on measures being taken in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

COVID-19 cases and recoveries

As of today, August 26, at 3 p.m., the COVID-19 case count for Yukon is 15. Everyone has recovered. We have tested 2,459 people.

Respiratory Assessment Centre

From Wednesday, August 19, to Tuesday, August 25, we tested 116 people at the Respiratory Assessment Centre in Whitehorse.

Contact sports guidelines

Guidelines for contact sports are [now on] Yukon.ca. By adapting the way we play contact sports to reduce the risk of COVID-19 we can get back on the ice, field and court. The new guidelines apply to children and adult leagues and supplement the Government of Yukon’s existing sport and recreation guidelines.

Holding a gathering guidelines

Guidelines for holding organized gatherings as well as social gatherings are now online. Organized gatherings are seated events in a rented venue, such as weddings, celebrations of life and cultural events. You can have up to 50 people at an organized event indoors and up to 100 people outdoors. All rental venues need to have an operational plan and guests and organizers need to follow the plan.

Social gatherings are events in private homes or public spaces, such as birthday celebrations, retirement parties and backyard barbecues. You can have up to 10 people indoors or 50 people outdoors for these sorts of gatherings.

When to stay home

Yukoners are reminded not to go to work or school if they’re feeling sick. They should check the Iist of COVID-19 symptoms on Yukon.ca, complete the online assessment tool and get tested if that’s recommended.

If someone in a family or household is unwell, the people they live with may go to work or school unless a health care provider has told them to stay home. This advice is the same if the person who’s unwell has been tested for COVID-19. 

Testing and self-isolation

Anyone who does not feel well should check the COVID-19 list of symptoms on Yukon.ca, complete the online assessment tool and get tested if it’s recommended.

Anyone who has symptoms of COVID-19 should self-isolate and use the online self-assessment tool at Yukon.ca, call 811 or contact their health care provider. They’ll receive guidance from a health care provider according to their individual circumstances. There are many unique situations that require guidance from public health officials.

People who are tested for COVID-19 should continue to self-isolate until they receive their test result or until a health care provider advises them they no longer need to.

People returning to or travelling into Yukon from anywhere except British Columbia, the Northwest Territories or Nunavut must self-isolate for a full 14 days, regardless of testing.

We’re grateful to everyone who takes getting tested and self-isolation seriously and helps to reduce the risk of infection in their community.

Reporting possible Civil Emergency Measures Act offences

If anyone has concerns that someone is violating a Civil Emergency Measures Act (CEMA) Order, they can now fill in a form on Yukon.ca. People can also call the enforcement line at 1-877-374-0425.

Enforcement statistics

September 30, 2020: Please note that we have added a clarification to the "Other approved jurisdictions" category below.

The Government of Yukon has received 617 complaints:

  • Failure to self-isolate: 3,346
  • Social gatherings over 10 inside or 50 outside: 15
  • Failure to transit through Yukon in 24 hours or stay on the designated route: 236
  • Businesses failing to comply with Orders: 7
  • Failure to abide by a declaration form or not permitted entry into Yukon: 11
  • Other: 2

There have been six charges laid under the Civil Emergency Measures Act (CEMA).

A total of 37,042 travellers have come into Yukon:

  • Resident travellers: 6,990
  • BC residents: 5,164
  • NWT residents: 145
  • Other approved jurisdictions: 219*
  • Non-residents staying: 8,361
  • Non-residents transiting: 16,145
  • Other: 18

* Due to the fact that the way we’ve collected traveller data has changed since we started collecting statistics, the "Other approved jurisdictions" category has been used to categorize travellers that did not fall into an existing category. We’re reviewing how we collect and categorize statistics to maintain accuracy, and will make adjustments as necessary.

August 19, 2020 – COVID-19 update

The Government of Yukon has the following updates on measures being taken in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

COVID-19 case count

As of today, August 19, at 2 p.m. the COVID-19 case count for Yukon is 15. All 15 people have recovered. We have tested 2,270 people.

Respiratory Assessment Centre

From August 12 to August 18, 139 people went to the Respiratory Assessment Centre in Whitehorse and we tested 134 people.

Extension of US border restrictions

The Canada Border Services Agency and US Customs are temporarily restricting all non-essential travel across its borders to limit the spread of COVID-19 as a precautionary measure. They’ve extended the current border measures until September 21, 2020.

Long-term care visiting restrictions eased

Residents of Yukon’s five long-term care homes can now receive two designated visitors indoors. They can also have an additional two designated visitors for outside visits. Age restrictions have also been lifted.

We closed long-term care homes to visitors and volunteers on March 16. Outdoor visits were introduced on June 12 for two designated visitors. All visits must be booked in advance. Work continues on planning to reintroduce volunteers to facilities. For more information on these changes, see Yukon.ca.

Travel manners

Yukoners are reminded to follow the Safe 6 even when outside Yukon. As more concerns are raised about the open border with BC and increasing case counts in that province, the Chief Medical Officer of Health says following the Safe 6 is the surest way to stay safe and protect against the spread of COVID-19 both in and out of the territory.

Case announcement

Going forward, new cases of COVID-19 will be identified through news releases and on Yukon.ca. Media events to announce each new case will not be held. As part of living with COVID-19, new cases are expected in the coming months and as we begin to normalize our new reality, we will continue to announce new cases as they’re diagnosed through a news release and on Yukon.ca.

Stay home if you’re sick

While it’s been one of the Safe 6 throughout the duration of the pandemic, staying home when you’re sick has never been more important. Anyone who’s feeling unwell should not go to school or work. If you do not feel well, check the COVID-19 list of symptoms on Yukon.ca, complete the online assessment and get tested if it’s recommended.

Public complaints received

The Government of Yukon has received 559 COVID-19 related complaints:

  • Failure to self-isolate: 303
  • Gatherings over 10 inside or 50 outside: 15
  • Failure to transit through Yukon in 24 hours or stay on their designated route: 223
  • Businesses failing to comply with Orders: 7
  • Failure to abide by declaration or not permitted entry into Yukon: 1
  • Number of charges under the Civil Emergency Measures Act (CEMA): 6

Incoming travellers

September 30, 2020: Please note that we have added a clarification to the "Other approved jurisdictions" category below.

A total of 34,316 travellers have come into Yukon:

  • Resident travellers: 6,303
  • BC residents: 4,139
  • NWT residents: 104
  • Other approved jurisdictions: 84*
  • Non-residents staying: 8,143
  • Non-residents transiting: 15,533
  • Other: 10
  • Number of decals issued: 185

* Due to the fact that the way we’ve collected traveller data has changed since we started collecting statistics, the "Other approved jurisdictions" category has been used to categorize travellers that did not fall into an existing category. We’re reviewing how we collect and categorize statistics to maintain accuracy, and will make adjustments as necessary.

August 7, 2020 – One new case of COVID-19 in Yukon

Yukon’s Chief Medical Officer of Health, Dr. Brendan Hanley today announced the first in-territory case of COVID-19 since April 20, 2020, bringing the territory’s total to 15, including the three Yukon residents diagnosed outside Yukon.

The person is a Whitehorse resident who is recovering at home. Yukon Communicable Disease Control (YCDC) has begun contact tracing. 

The individual travelled recently to Dawson. All Dawson-related contacts have been identified and are being followed up on.

In a follow-up to last week’s advisory, Yukon residents who were in Dawson City, between July 20 and today including residents of Dawson City are advised to self-monitor for any symptoms of COVID-19. Dawson City residents who exhibit even mild symptoms of COVID-19 are asked to get tested at the Dawson Community Hospital or Dawson Health Centre.

Whitehorse residents who have travelled to Dawson City since July 20, and who are experiencing any symptoms, should call YCDC directly, identify as having been in Dawson City during this time period and arrange to get tested.

In addition, people who may have been at Superstore in Whitehorse between the hours of 8 a.m. to 9 a.m. on August 1 or who attended the Sunday service at Sacred Heart Cathedral at 10:30 a.m. on August 2 should also monitor themselves for symptoms:

The symptoms of COVID-19 are:  

  • fever;
  • chills;
  • cough;
  • difficulty breathing;
  • shortness of breath;
  • runny nose;
  • sore throat;
  • loss of sense of taste or smell;
  • headache;
  • fatigue;
  • loss of appetite;
  • nausea and vomiting;
  • diarrhea; and
  • muscle aches.

Anyone who develops any of these symptoms regardless of how mild, should self-isolate immediately and arrange for testing. Testing will be available this weekend (August 8 and 9).

For people with symptoms who were at Superstore or Sacred Heart in Whitehorse, call YCDC at 667-5080 to arrange for testing over the weekend. In Dawson City, call Dawson City Hospital at 993-4444 to arrange for testing over the weekend. In other communities, call your community health centre. Please identify as being in one of the above exposure locations.

People who were in these locations, but have no symptoms should self-monitor for 14 days after their exposure. If you develop symptoms no matter how mild, people should self-isolate immediately and contact 811, complete the self-assessment tool or contact their health care provider.  

For people in Whitehorse with symptoms of COVID-19 who have not been in the above locations at the specified times, call the Respiratory Assessment Centre at 393-3083. It's open 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, August 8 and 9. In Dawson City, call the Hospital at 993-4444 to arrange for testing.

Read the news release. 

August 5, 2020 – Update on COVID-19

The Government of Yukon has the following updates on measures being taken in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

COVID-19 case count

As of today, August 5, at 2 p.m. the COVID-19 case count is 14. All of the 11 people who have contracted COVID-19 in Yukon have recovered. There are no active cases in the territory and 1,769 people have been tested. We have had no new cases since April 20.

Additional information stations set up in Beaver Creek and Watson Lake

To support the government’s COVID-19 response, the visitor information centre in Watson Lake and the Yukon Beringia Interpretive Centre will be closing on August 6. The visitor information centre in Beaver Creek will be closing on August 9. Staff from these three facilities have been reassigned to work out of information stations at Yukon’s land and air borders where they will provide visitors with COVID-19 resources and information about how and where to travel safely, respectfully and responsibly in and through Yukon.

Information stations are located at the Civil Emergency Measures Act (CEMA) border station outside of Watson Lake, the Canada Border Services Agency station in Beaver Creek, the top of Robert Service Way and at the airport in Whitehorse.

The Yukon Beringia Interpretive Centre will be continuing online programming throughout the summer and fall. Details and information are available on Facebook and at Beringia.com.

Changes to guidelines for bars, pubs and lounges

Updated guidelines for bars, pubs, lounges and nightclubs mean that music, including singing and wind instruments, is now permitted if requirements are met. These include a physical distance between musicians and patrons. Karaoke is also permitted for solo performers and musicians and performers must be screened for illness prior to performing. Dancing is still not permitted.

Other changes include no self-serve bar service to people. Food and drinks must be delivered to the patron’s designated table. See bars, pubs, lounges and nightclubs reopening guidelines: COVID-19 on Yukon.ca.

Child care guidelines updated

Guidelines for child care services have been provided to all child care and day home operators in Yukon. Parents are no longer required to fill in an assessment tool daily but are reminded to assess their child before delivering them to daycare. See child care centres and family day homes on Yukon.ca.

Public notifications

Yukon Communicable Disease Control (YCDC) is very experienced in contact tracing and determining the need for public notification. When YCDC can identify people who have been exposed, they will contact them directly. This preferred approach protects an individual’s confidentiality while obtaining the needed information.

If this is not possible then there are three other approaches.

  • When they have clear detail on locations and time, but not exact information on who may have been present and whether there may have been public mixing, a public notification will be issued.
  • With reliable information that spacing and sanitation protocols are being followed (e.g., at hotels, restaurants or campgrounds) so there is no opportunity for public exposure, these places are not identified as contact locations.
  • With little detail on when and where someone was, but a location, a broader notification is required, which is the least preferred option and only done as a last resort.

Visitor decals now available in nine communities

People in Yukon with out-of-territory plates can pick up a set of visitor decals at designated pickup points in Whitehorse and nine communities. They must first have completed their 14-day self-isolation period, if it was required. Eligibility requirements are listed on Yukon.ca.

In Carmacks, Dawson, Faro, Haines Junction, Mayo, Old Crow, Ross River, Teslin and Watson Lake, decals can be picked up during business hours from the Department of Environment or Compliance Monitoring and Inspections offices. In Whitehorse, decals can be picked up at the Emergency Measures Office, Monday to Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.

A visitor decal indicates that the occupants are not required to self-isolate and the vehicle is authorized to travel in and around Yukon. One decal will be placed on the driver’s side of the windshield and the other will be displayed at the back of the vehicle.

Enforcement statistics

Since April 29, 32,104 travellers have entered or passed through Yukon. Of those, 6,067 were Yukoners, 4,115 were from BC, and 14,100 were non-residents transiting through the territory. So far, Yukon has issued 123 visitor decals for non-residents. The Government of Yukon Emergency Coordination Centre received 526 complaints since April 29. So far, six people have been fined for violating the Civil Emergency Measures Act.

July 31, 2020 – Government of Yukon news release

Phase 3 begins August 1, includes changes to social gatherings, social bubbles and plans for sports

The Government of Yukon and Yukon’s Chief Medical Officer of Health officially announced today that Phase 3 of Yukon’s plan for safely lifting COVID-19 public health measures will begin on August 1. This will be the longest of the stages, lasting until a vaccine is developed, and will involve a gradual easing of restrictions for Yukoners.

Read the news release.

July 22, 2020 – Update on COVID-19

The Government of Yukon has the following updates on measures being taken in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. 

COVID-19 case count

As of today, July 22, at 2 p.m. the COVID-19 case count is 13. All of the 11 people who have contracted COVID-19 in Yukon have recovered. There are no active cases in the territory and 1,450 people have been tested.

Update on the start of Phase 3

Phase 3 is expected to begin on August 1, 2020. The public is reminded that Phase 3 will be a long one, anticipated to take Yukon through until a COVID-19 vaccine is available.


Initially, changes under Phase 3 will be internal to the territory only. Changes being considered are expansion of family bubbles, gatherings and a return to sport play.

Additional changes and relaxation of other restrictions will be considered as appropriate, based on public health principles and level of risk.

Expanded testing statistics

Testing criteria was expanded on July 15 to include a broader range of symptoms for individuals who have not travelled. This was done in response to and in anticipation of the opening of the border with British Columbia, the Northwest Territories and Nunavut, and flu season.

Since July 15, 75 tests have been conducted. Testing is happening at Yukon Communicable Disease Control (YCDC), the respiratory assessment centre (RAC), and in some cases, Whitehorse General Hospital. There have been 170 tests conducted since July 1.

Contact tracing emails

If someone is named as a contact of a person who has COVID 19, they will be contacted by Yukon Communicable Disease Control (YCDC). Yukoners are encouraged to be on alert for scams related to contact tracing. Any other contact tracing outreach being conducted by anyone aside from YCDC is not valid.

Stories are circulating about emails being sent to individuals identifying them as having been somewhere where someone has been diagnosed as positive. The email encourages the recipient to open a document for instructions, which they should not do as these emails are fraudulent. All contact tracing is done directly by YCDC.

Visitor decals available for eligible vehicles with out-of-territory licence plates

As of July 20, 2020, some vehicles with out-of-territory licence plates will be provided with a visitor decal when they enter Yukon at a border check station staffed by Government of Yukon enforcement officers.

Visitor decals will be provided to critical service providers and travellers who have completed their 14-day self-isolation as required, including: Canadians with plates from jurisdictions outside of British Columbia, the Northwest Territories and Nunavut; Americans providing essential services in Yukon; and foreign residents who have been permitted entry to Canada by the Canadian Border Services Agency. The green visitor decal placed on the driver’s side of the windshield indicates that the occupants are not required to self-isolate and the vehicle is authorized to travel in and around Yukon.

People in Yukon with out-of-territory plates can pick up a visitor decal at the Emergency Measures Office located at 60 Norseman Road in Whitehorse. People living in Yukon communities can contact covid19enforcement@gov.yk.ca to request a visitor decal. Eligible visitors must first have completed their 14-day self-isolation period, if it was required.

Visitors as well as residents are reminded to be kind, respectful and be safe. Everyone is is encouraged to practise the Six Steps to Staying Safe.

July 15, 2020 – Update on COVID-19

COVID-19 case count

As of today, July 15, at 2 p.m. the COVID-19 case count remains at 11 in the territory. All of the 11 people who have contracted COVID-19 in Yukon have recovered. There are no active cases in the territory and 1,365 people have been tested. We have had no new cases since April 20.

Border control statistics

Our border measures have given us the time to prepare for COVID-19, including enhancing our testing, tracking and tracing capacity. Since the start of Phase 2 on July 1, 1,587 British Columbia residents and 1,130 Yukoners have entered Yukon. In that time, 1,627 people have transited through the territory. The Government of Yukon Emergency Coordination Centre received 119 complaints from the public since July 1. Since border restrictions began earlier this year, four individuals have been fined for violating the Civil Emergency Measures Act (CEMA). Right now there are approximately 45 enforcement officers in the territory.

Government of Yukon working arrangement update

During Phase 2 and as we transition into Phase 3, many employees will gradually be returning to the workplace though some will continue to work from home depending on operational requirements and employee circumstances. At the height of employees working remotely, approximately 50 per cent of the government’s workforce was working from home. Currently the percentage of employees working from home is approximately 34 per cent. A gradual return to the workplace will ensure the ongoing health and safety of employees.

Health measures adopted during Phase 2 will be instrumental in helping the organization adapt to existing and emerging challenges. Employees who will be returning can expect to have a conversation with their supervisor about the details of coming back into the workplace. Some measures in place include directional tape and signage on the floor and walls, adhering to the six steps to staying safe, including physical distancing, and having less or different access to communal spaces such as kitchens.

Whitehorse Public Library to reopen to public

The Whitehorse Public Library will reopen its doors to the public on July 21, 2020. The Chief Medical Officer of Health had ordered the facility closed on March 18, 2020. Since then, the library had continued to offer some services, with curbside pickup of library materials added on June 15, 2020.

The reopening of the facility’s doors marks the next phase in the library’s overall reopening plan. It will allow the public to once again browse the library’s materials and borrow books, DVDs and CDs in-person. There will also be limited access to the library’s public computers, printing and reference desk services.

To support physical distancing and the safety of both the public and staff, the library has introduced a few changes as part of this phase of reopening. These include:

  • hand sanitizing requirements on entry;
  • limited seating until new. more easily sanitized, furniture arrives;
  • reducing the number of computer stations and usage times; and
  • asking people to bring in their own headphones to use at the public computers.

The Whitehorse Public Library will be open Tuesday to Sunday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. each day. Local library boards manage community libraries across the territory and determine what services community libraries will provide during the pandemic. Patrons in the communities can find out the latest by calling their local library directly.

July 8, 2020 – Update on COVID-19

The Government of Yukon has the following updates on measures being taken in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

COVID-19 cases and recoveries

As of today, July 8 at 2 p.m., the case count remains at 11 cases of COVID-19 in the territory.

All of the 11 people who have contracted COVID-19 in Yukon have recovered. There are no active cases in the territory and 1306 people have been tested. We have had no new cases since April 20 and our last case recovered on May 1.

We have traced each case in Yukon so far to its origin which means there continues to be no known community spread in the territory. We assume community spread has occurred when we can no longer trace how somebody became infected.

Weekday updates

We update information about COVID-19 cases and tests every weekday on Yukon.ca, except public holidays. The information we publish includes how many confirmed cases there are in Yukon, how many tests have been negative, how many results are pending, the total number of tests and how many people have recovered.

Respiratory Assessment Centre reopens

In anticipation of the demand for increased testing as a result of opening Yukon’s borders and in preparation for influenza season, the stand alone respiratory assessment centre reopened on Monday, July 6. The new location is 49A Waterfront Place in Whitehorse and the hours are from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. People will still require a referral from 811 Yukon HealthLine, a family physician, community health nurse or Whitehorse General Hospital and can arrange a time for testing by calling 393-3083.

Hospital changes visiting policy

Effective July 6, Whitehorse General Hospital changed its visiting policy. All admitted patients are now allowed one designated, and consistent, visitor. All maternity, Emergency Room (ER) and Intensive Care Unit (ICU) patients will continue to be permitted one designated visitor/support person.

Patients and clients checking in for blood work, imaging exams, physio or occupational therapy and specialists appointments will not be permitted a support person except in limited circumstances.

Screeners will remain in place at all public entrances and will ask about travel history and heath symptoms. Questions about hospital policies or services during the COVID-19 pandemic can be directed to to 867-393-9040, this number is not for medical advice or support.

Visitor Information Centres open

Five of Yukon’s visitor information centres are now open. The visitor information centres in Whitehorse, Carcross, Dawson City and Beaver Creek opened on July 1 and the Watson Lake centre opened on July 5.

Visitors are being provided with the most up to date information from Yukon.ca as well as Council for Yukon First Nations' communities site. Visitor information centre staff are advising travellers to check to make sure that communities are receptive to visitors and providing reminders for people to visit respectfully. The advice applies to visitors from outside Yukon and Yukon residents who may be taking a “staycation” this year.  Visit Travel to Yukon communities guidelines: COVID-19 for more information.

Six steps to staying safe 

The six steps to staying safe and stopping the spread of COVID-19 are: physical distancing; regular hand washing; staying home when sick; not gathering in groups of more than 10; limiting travel to communities and self-isolating when required.

Latest information

To keep up to date with the latest information and to read the government’s reopening plan, A Path Forward: Yukon’s plan for lifting COVID-19 restrictions, Yukoners should visit Yukon.ca/COVID-19.

June 24, 2020 – Update on COVID-19

The Government of Yukon has the following updates on measures being taken in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

COVID-19 case count

As of today, June 17, at 2 p.m. the COVID-19 case count remains at 11 in the territory. All of the 11 people who have contracted COVID-19 in Yukon have recovered. There are no active cases in the territory and 1,265 people have been tested. We have had no new cases since April 20.

Border controls to be eased

Starting July 1, residents of British Columbia and Yukon will be allowed to travel back and forth without the need to self-isolate for 14 days. BC residents entering Yukon will need to provide documentation proving their BC residence at the border or airport, such as a driver’s licence.

Also from July 1, residents of the Northwest Territories and Nunavut will be allowed to enter Yukon without needing to self-isolate for 14 days, as long as they travel directly to Yukon from one of the territories or through BC.

The decision to ease border restrictions was made based on careful risk assessments and confidence in the territory’s health care capacity and ability to contact trace if new cases arrive in Yukon.

Resources for vulnerable populations

To help Yukoners at risk during this pandemic, vulnerable populations can now access mental health and social supports online. This includes homeless people, those experiencing or at risk of gender-based violence, people with disabilities, seniors and those with underlying medical conditions.

Pools to reopen

Effective July 1, public pools will be able to operate with an approved operational plan. Swimming and other water-related activities are excellent ways to get the physical activity needed for a healthy life.

The use of public pools is considered a low-risk activity as long as pools are operated safely and are properly maintained. All requirements in the Public Pool Regulations, under the Public Health and Safety Act, must be adhered to. An operational plan must be submitted to COVID19info@gov.yk.ca and there must be a pre-opening public pool inspection. Pool operators throughout the territory have been advised of this information.

Farmers market

Beginning July 1, the Whitehorse Farmers Market can welcome non-food vendors (such as artisans and soap and flower sellers). Information booths will continue to be excluded. In addition, market organizers have been advised they now have the ability to offer seating and an outdoor dining experience to the public as long as physical distancing is maintained. Buskers are also allowed to return to the market beginning July 1.

June 17, 2020 – Update on COVID-19

The Government of Yukon has the following updates on measures being taken in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

COVID-19 case count

As of today, June 17, at 2 p.m. the COVID-19 case count remains at 11 in the territory. All of the 11 people who have contracted COVID-19 in Yukon have recovered. There are no active cases in the territory and 1,245 people have been tested. We have had no new cases since April 20.

Full dental services to resume in Yukon

Dental professionals may again offer full dental services in the territory beginning on July 1. All dental care except emergency and urgent procedures had previously been suspended due to the pandemic on March 27. The Chief Medical Officer of Health has recommended the resumption of full dental services as part of the territory’s COVID-19 reopening plan, which enters Phase 2 on July 1.

Dental professionals will be able to offer non-urgent services, including but not limited to:

  • initial or periodic oral examinations or recall visits;
  • routine dental cleaning and preventative therapies;
  • routine radiographs;
  • extraction of asymptomatic teeth;
  • aesthetic dental procedures;
  • dental implants;
  • restorative dentistry; and
  • non-painful chronic periapical lesions.

At this time, dental professionals must continue to follow the Chief Medical Officer of Health’s Recommended Practices and Personal Protective Equipment.

Guidelines issued

Guidelines have now been created and posted for the operation of fitness centres and gyms. This guidance does not apply to recreation centres with pools, arenas, sports fields or large indoor spaces for gatherings. It is designed for public indoor spaces designed for shared fitness purposes. An operational plan must be submitted if the operation employs staff and the safe six must be applied.

Guidelines for the operation of public recreation centres have also been released. These guidelines address facilities with large indoor spaces, pools, running tracks, curling and ice rinks, etc. Again, operational plans must be submitted and the safe six adhered to. 

Restaurants at full capacity

Beginning July 1, Yukon restaurants can increase their operating capacity from 50 per cent to 100 per cent. Restaurants were closed to all but take out services on March 22 and reopened at 50 per cent on May 29. Restaurants will still be required to follow the reopening food premises guidelines.

Gatherings

As of July 1, outdoor gatherings in Yukon may have up to 50 people in attendance. These should still respect physical distancing guidelines and may not serve shared food. No buffets or pot lucks are permitted at this time. The limit for indoor gatherings remains at 10 or fewer.

Yukon Public Library update

Public libraries throughout Yukon will begin providing varying levels of service to their respective communities. People should contact their local library for more details. 

Whitehorse Public Library currently offers curbside service. Patrons can place holds on materials by phoning 867-667-5239, by emailing whitehorse.library@gov.yk.ca or online. Books on hold can be picked up Monday to Friday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Appropriate physical distancing measures will be in place for the library curbside pickup and library items will be processed according to recommended national guidelines and safety protocols. This includes a quarantine period, which means a delay in getting books back into circulation. Late fees will continue to be waived and extended loan periods remain in place. The e-library continues to be available for use.

June 12, 2020 – Update on COVID-19

The Government of Yukon has the following updates on measures being taken in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

COVID-19 case count

As of today, June 12, at 2 p.m. the COVID-19 case count remains at 11 in the territory. All of the 11 people who have contracted COVID-19 in Yukon have recovered. There are no active cases in the territory and 1,235 people have been tested. We have had no new cases since April 20.

State of emergency extended

On the advice of the Chief Medical Officer of Health, the Government of Yukon is extending the state of emergency under the Civil Emergency Measures Act (CEMA) for another 90 days, as of today. This will allow the government to continue to use every tool at its disposal to protect the health and safety of Yukoners during the COVID-19 pandemic.

As the pandemic continues to evolve and there continues to be nationwide transmission of COVID-19, the Government of Yukon is continually evaluating the situation and will adjust measures as necessary. The state of emergency can be cancelled at any time, or can continue to be extended by 90 days so long as the pandemic continues to pose a risk to Yukoners.

Violations of the orders under the CEMA are an offence and are punishable by a fine or imprisonment. A full list of the orders and legislative changes made under the Civil Emergency Measures Act can be found at yukon.ca/en/health-and-wellness/covid-19/legislation-changes-covid-19.

Guidelines released for visitors at long-term care facilities

Outdoor visits for long-term care residents are now permitted with the release of a staged plan for the reopening of long-term care facilities in Yukon to visitors. Currently residents can identify one visitor with whom they can visit in a pre-set outdoor location. The reintroduction of visitors is staged over four phases, similar to the Yukon government’s Path Forward plan. Phase 2 will permit two outdoor visitors at the same time.

The territory’s five long-term care homes were closed to all visitors and volunteers on March 16 to avoid introduction of COVID-19 into long-term care homes. In Canada the highest number of deaths is attributed to COVID-19 in nursing and long-term care homes.

Bars able to reopen shortly

Guidelines for the reopening of bars within the territory have been shared with all proprietors, with the intent of giving them time to prepare for reopening on Friday, June 19. Bars may only open at 50 per cent capacity, the same as restaurants. This is intended to promote physical distancing and limit the size of groups. Groups planning to gather at a bar can be no larger than 10 sitting together.

All bars must submit an operational plan to the Health Emergency Operations Centre for approval. Live music will not be permitted at this time and recreation areas such as dart boards, pool tables, dance floors and gaming (such as pinball and video games) are not permitted to open at this time.

COVID-19 update

As plans for reopening move forward and there is no presence of COVID-19 in Yukon, we are reducing the number of updates. The regular COVID-19 updates will move to once a week beginning Wednesday, June 17, at 2 p.m. 

June 5, 2020 – Update on COVID-19

The Government of Yukon has the following updates on measures being taken in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

COVID-19 case count

As of today, June 5, at 2 p.m. the COVID-19 case count remains at 11 in the territory. All of the 11 people who have contracted COVID-19 in Yukon have recovered. There are no active cases in the territory and 1,201 people have been tested. We have had no new cases since April 20.

Updated guidance for critical and essential service workers released

The Government of Yukon’s guidance for critical and essential workers has been updated this week to provide greater clarity to workers delivering critical and essential services in the territory between now and July 1, 2020. After July 1, 2020, restrictions will be eased for critical and essential workers entering Yukon from BC.

The updated guidance document clarifies that the restrictions of gatherings to 10 people does not apply to workplaces, that people who need to do urgent repairs or maintenance on infrastructure are considered critical workers, as are judges, witnesses and other individuals necessary to carry out the rule of law. The updated document also clarifies that all of Yukon’s communities – whether Whitehorse or rural – should be treated similarly by people who need to come to Yukon to work from outside the territory.

The guidance document is in effect immediately and only applies to the current phase of our approach to the pandemic. Further changes to this document may arise once we enter Phase 2 of our plan to lift COVID-19 restrictions.

Updates to A Path Forward: Yukon’s plan for lifting COVID-19 restrictions

Following the announcement about the anticipated start of Phase 2 on July 1, Yukon’s plan for lifting COVID-19 restrictions has been updated to include specific dates and new timelines. Find the latest version of the plan to lift restrictions. It will be updated periodically as we progress through the phases of the plan.

Faith-based services

Beginning this Sunday, June 7, places of worship will be permitted to open. Service organizers and attendees are required to adopt steps to ensure physical distancing, even adapting the nature of their services where necessary.

This means, for example, that the seating capacity of indoor venues will be limited to one third of the building capacity up to a maximum of 50 people including service leaders and organizers.

Leaders and organizers must also increase the frequency of cleaning and disinfecting common, high-touch areas such as seating, railings, switched and ceremonial objects. Organizers are required to complete an operational plan that must be produced if requested. It does not need to be approved in advance. The guidance for faith-based services and activities is now online at Yukon.ca.

Mental health resources

Yukon has a wide range of mental health support. list of the resources is available on the Yukon.ca.

These resources are provided by the Yukon government, First Nations governments, the federal government and the non-governmental organization (NGO) community. The majority of these supports remain available during the COVID-19 pandemic. Some services have been altered to comply with the orders and recommendations of the Chief Medical Officer of Health.

This list is not comprehensive and the provision of services will change depending on which phase Yukon is at based on the plan for management of the COVID-19 pandemic level in Yukon, including plans to lift restrictions.

These resources have been collected and organized by population to make it easier for health care providers, NGOs and anyone supporting the health and wellness of Yukoners, so identify the appropriate resources.

Accessing Opioid Treatment Services during COVID-19

Opioid Treatment Services and support are available to anyone who feels a need to discuss or address their opioid use, especially considering the increased stressors many are under due to COVID-19. The medical community is expressing concerns over the lack of safe supply. This may encourage people to seek treatment over fears that the drugs they normally use may not be available or are unsafe to use and that some individuals may be using more at this time as a coping mechanism. 

Opioid treatment includes access to prescription medications such as suboxone and methadone used to treat opioid use disorder. If people are unsure if treatment is right for them, they are encouraged to come in and have a conversation with a clinician about what options are available and what treatment might look like.

Opioid Treatment Services operate out of the Referred Care Clinic at 210 Elliott Street in Whitehorse. Normally these are drop-in services but because of COVID-19, the public is being asked to call first and make an appointment. The clinic operates Monday through Wednesday, 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. and 1 to 4 p.m. and can be reached at 867-668-2552. Harm reduction supplies and naloxone kits are also available through the clinic. 

May 26, 2020 – Update on COVID-19

Yukon’s Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Brendan Hanley has the following updates for the Yukon public on measures being taken in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

COVID-19 cases and recoveries

As of today, May 26, at 2 p.m. the case count remains at 11 cases of COVID-19 in the territory.

All of the 11 people who have contracted COVID-19 in Yukon have recovered. There are no active cases in the territory and 1,159 people have been tested. We have had no new cases since April 20.

We have traced each case in Yukon so far to its origin which means there continues to be no known community spread in the territory. We assume community spread has occurred when we can no longer trace how somebody became infected.

Weekday updates

We update information about COVID-19 cases and tests every weekday on Yukon.ca, except public holidays. The information we publish includes how many confirmed cases there are in Yukon, how many tests have been negative, how many results are pending, the total number of tests and how many people have recovered. Today’s update focuses on the modelling work being done within the Chief Medical Officer of Health office. Copies of this technical briefing presentation are available here.

Single site survey

To address the potential risk of COVID-19 transmission from the movement of staff, volunteers and contractors between certain facilities, such as long-term care facilities, and other volunteer and employment settings, the Chief Medical Officer of Health will collect information to identify where there is cross over.

As Yukon prepares to shift into a new phase of the pandemic response it may be necessary to restrict movement of certain employees between facilities and other employment types in order to lessen the risk of COVID-19 transmission in these facilities. The goal of this project is to ensure the continuity of services and to protect the health of residents and employees in facilities, while mitigating impacts on operations and on affected staff.

All information is being collected through a secure online portal and in accordance with applicable Yukon privacy legislation.

Day camps and Canada Games Centre

Since the publication of the guidelines for summer day camps, City of Whitehorse camps and Polarettes have had their plans okayed. Additional plans are being reviewed this week.

The phased-in reopening of the Canada Games Centres has also been approved. The plan allows for time at each phase to educate, monitor, adjust and evaluate before moving on, similar to the government’s reopening plan.

Paramedic Services Week

May 24 to 30 is Paramedic Services Week and thanks go to our volunteer emergency medical responders, advanced, critical and primary care paramedics, the critical care nurses working alongside them on the medevac crews and dispatchers and other Emergency Medical Services (EMS) staff working behind the scenes to support them.

Of the almost 200 members of Emergency Medical Services, more than 100 are volunteer Emergency Medical Responders. They’re the backbone of EMS operations in 15 communities across the territory. These volunteer paramedics go above and beyond the call of duty, even responding to serious incidents outside of their scheduled hours. We thank them for their dedication and hard work and for giving their time to support their communities.

Morel mushroom season

Yukoners will now be able to obtain permits for harvesting morel mushrooms commercially provided they remain compliant with the six steps to staying safe. Travel to Yukon is not permitted for commercial harvesting of mushrooms and permits will not be issued to non-Yukon residents.

Six steps to staying safe 

The six steps to staying safe and stopping the spread of COVID-19 are: physical distancing; regular hand washing; staying home when sick; not gathering in groups of more than 10; limiting travel to communities and self-isolating when required.

Latest information

To keep up to date with the latest information and to read the government’s reopening plan, A Path Forward: Yukon’s plan for lifting COVID-19 restrictions, Yukoners should visit Yukon.ca.

May 22, 2020 – Update on COVID-19

Yukon’s Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Brendan Hanley has the following updates for the Yukon public on measures being taken in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

COVID-19 cases and recoveries

As of today, May 22, at 2 p.m. the case count remains at 11 cases of COVID-19 in the territory.

All of the 11 people who have contracted COVID-19 in Yukon have recovered. There are no active cases in the territory and 1,145 people have been tested. We have had no new cases since April 20.

We have traced each case in Yukon so far to its origin which means there continues to be no known community spread in the territory. We assume community spread has occurred when we can no longer trace how somebody became infected.

Weekday updates

We update information about COVID-19 cases and tests every weekday on Yukon.ca, except public holidays. The information we publish includes how many confirmed cases there are in Yukon, how many tests have been negative, how many results are pending, the total number of tests and how many people have recovered.

Civil Emergency Measures Act new Order

A new health order was issued today under the Civil Emergency Measures Act. This Order allows the Minister of Community Services in consultation with the Chief Medical Officer of Health to review and approve variations to the requirements and restrictions in the existing orders.

This will provide more flexibility as we move forward with the reopening plan so that services such as hair salons and dine-in restaurants can resume. It also allows the Government of Yukon to respond quickly and close services if we see a spike in COVID-19 cases or community spread of the virus in the territory.

Child care services

Licensed child care operators can now provide child care for the children of all Yukon families, rather than only for vulnerable families and the families of critical and essential workers. Child care operators can also return to their pre-COVID-19 enrolment numbers and are now following the new guidelines for operating child care centres during COVID-19.

Inspectors are working with child care operators to determine when they can return to their normal licensing capacity.

Restaurants

From May 29, restaurants can again provide dine-in services, as long as they have developed a COVID-19 operational plan to keep staff and customers safe and the government has approved the plan. Restaurants have been able to continue providing take-out services throughout the pandemic.

Personal services

Personal services businesses can reopen on May 27 as long as they have developed a COVID-19 operational plan and it has been approved by the government. Personal services businesses include hair salons, barber shops, tattoo parlours, nail salons and non-registered massage therapists.

We ask Yukoners to be patient and give businesses the time they need to get ready to provide services again after their complete closure.

COVID-19 operational plan template

All businesses, service providers and employers need to have a COVID-19 operational plan in place even if they were not mandated to close under the Civil Emergency Measures Act. They don’t need to have the plan approved in order to operate but need to have it available for inspection by the government.

The template for COVID-19 operational plans is on Yukon.ca.

As and when the government lifts restrictions on types of businesses currently mandated to close under the Civil Emergency Measures Act those businesses must complete a COVID-19 operational plan and have it approved by the government before they can reopen.

Recreational programming COVID-19 review form

Event planners and recreational programmers should develop a COVID-19 plan and get it approved by public health officials. The online form is on the “Request a review of business, service or event operations during COVID-19 page” of Yukon.ca.

Six steps to staying safe 

The six steps to staying safe and stopping the spread of COVID-19 are: physical distancing; regular hand washing; staying home when sick; not gathering in groups of more than 10; limiting travel to communities and self-isolating when required.

Latest information

To keep up to date with the latest information and to read the government’s reopening plan, A Path Forward: Yukon’s plan for lifting COVID-19 restrictions, Yukoners should visit Yukon.ca.

May 19, 2020 – Update on COVID-19

Yukon’s Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Brendan Hanley has the following updates for the Yukon public on measures being taken in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

COVID-19 cases and recoveries

As of today, May 19, at 2 p.m. the case count remains at 11 cases of COVID-19 in the territory.

All of the 11 people who have contracted COVID-19 in Yukon have recovered. There are no active cases in the territory and 1,134 people have been tested. We have had no new cases since April 20.

We have traced each case in Yukon so far to its origin which means there continues to be no known community spread in the territory. We assume community spread has occurred when we can no longer trace how somebody became infected.

Weekday updates

We update information about COVID-19 cases and tests every weekday on Yukon.ca, except public holidays. The information we publish includes how many confirmed cases there are in Yukon, how many tests have been negative, how many results are pending, the total number of tests and how many people have recovered.

Combined households

As from May 15, 2020, the territory is now in Phase 1 of the Government of Yukon’s reopening plan, A Path Forward. This means we can all now choose one other household to join up with and not have to practise physical distancing with people in that household. Once we’ve chosen a household to pair with we cannot change to another pairing.

It's acceptable if the number of people in the two households is more than 10 but we must continue to avoid gathering in social groups of more than 10 other than that. We must also continue to keep a physical distance of two metres (six feet) from anyone not in our two households.

There’s more information in the combined household guidelines on Yukon.ca.

Reopening businesses and services

Being in Phase 1 of the reopening plan means that businesses and service providers that weren’t ordered to close may operate as long as they have a COVID-19 operational plan and have put safety precautions in place.

Recreational programming such as sporting events and day camps are possible but organizers need to have an approved plan in place.

Businesses such as personal services and restaurants that were ordered to close will be able to open up again once they’ve prepared operational plans based on the guidelines we’re developing and had them approved.

Restaurants can meanwhile continue to provide take-out and delivery services but must submit an operational plan to the government by May 29. Guidelines for restaurants planning to restore table service will be available in the coming days.

All  other employers are also required to complete COVID-19 operational plans and have them available for inspection but these don’t need to be submitted for approval.

Businesses, employers and event organizers can find more information about the steps they need to take and where to send their plans for review or approval on the “Operating businesses, services and events safely during COVID-19” page of Yukon.ca.

As soon as we complete guidelines we publish them on the “Guidelines and recommendations” page of Yukon.ca.

A change to the six steps to staying safe 

Now that we’re in Phase 1, we’ve changed our guidance that said avoid travel to communities to instead asking people to limit travel to communities. Communities are particularly vulnerable during the pandemic and we ask Yukoners to travel within the territory as respectfully and safely as possible. 

The updated six steps to staying safe and stopping the spread of COVID-19 are: physical distancing; regular hand washing; staying home when sick; not gathering in groups of more than 10; limiting travel to communities and self-isolating when required.

Moving through reopening phases

We’ll make decisions about moving to the next phase of the reopening plan in a gradual, cautious and objective way with at least two to four weeks between each phase. This means we’ll have time to detect changes in the pandemic situation and evaluate the risks of the steps we’ve taken so far and how safe it is to move to the next stage. This is why we’re not committing to fixed dates. We’ll keep Yukoners informed at every step of the way.

The six criteria we’re basing our decisions on are: community engagement, preventative measures, public health capacity, importation risk, health system capacity, and virus spread and containment. The Government of Yukon will make decisions in consultation with Yukon’s Chief Medical Officer of Health.

The phases of the plan are: Phase 1 – restart; Phase 2 – recover; and Phase 3 – new normal. We also have Phase 0: response, which is the phase we were in until May 15 and, to be prepared in case the situation in Yukon backtracks and we need to impose restrictions again, we also have a Phase minus 1 – worsened state.

The full plan is published on Yukon.ca.

Victim Services

We recognize that staying home during the pandemic is not safe for everyone. Support is available for anyone who’s not safe at home because of partner violence, family violence or sexualized violence.

Victim Services can work with people to explore options based on their circumstances, help them make a safety plan and access safe shelter if they need it. To contact Victim Services, call toll free 1-800-661-0408, extension 8500.

Staff at the Women’s Transition home in Whitehorse, the Dawson Women’s Shelter or Help and Hope for families in Watson Lake can also help. If anyone needs immediate help they should call 9-1-1.

Latest information

To keep up to date with the latest information, Yukoners should visit Yukon.ca.

May 12, 2020 – Update on COVID-19

Yukon’s Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Brendan Hanley has the following updates for the Yukon public on measures being taken in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

COVID-19 cases and recoveries

As of today, May 12, at 2 p.m. the case count remains at 11 cases of COVID-19 in the territory.

All of the 11 people who have contracted COVID-19 in Yukon have recovered. There are no active cases in the territory and 1,106 individuals have been tested.

We have traced each case in Yukon so far to its origin which means there continues to be no known community spread in the territory. We assume community spread has occurred when we can no longer trace how somebody became infected.

Weekday case updates

While the number of cases of COVID-19 remains low, we’ll update information about COVID-19 cases and tests every weekday on Yukon.ca rather than daily as we have been doing lately. The information we publish includes how many confirmed cases there are in Yukon, how many tests have been negative, how many results are pending, the total number of tests and how many people have recovered.

Keeping COVID-19 out of Yukon

With no new cases announced since April 20, we must work together to keep COVID-19 out of the territory. We can do this by continuing to control our borders and maintaining the requirement for people arriving in Yukon to self-isolate for 14 days. Keeping these measures in place will enable us to start easing other restrictions.

Under the current Border Control Measures Order, people can only enter Yukon if they can provide evidence that they are:

Yukon residents;
non-resident family members of Yukon residents;
delivering a critical or essential service;
travelling through Yukon to a neighbouring jurisdiction, which they must do with 24 hours; or
exercising an Aboriginal or treaty right.

Information about how to safely self-isolate is on Yukon.ca.

National Nursing Week

During National Nursing Week, May 11 to 17, we’re celebrating the vital contributions that nurses make to our lives and are grateful for all they’re doing to help keep our families and friends safe and well in Yukon and all across the country. This year’s particularly apt theme is Nurses: A Voice to Lead – Nursing the World to Health. The World Health Organization has designated 2020 the Year of the Nurse.

Six steps to staying safe

The six steps to staying safe and stopping the spread of COVID-19 are: physical distancing; regular hand washing; staying home when sick; not gathering in groups of more than 10; avoiding unnecessary travel to communities and self-isolating when required.

Latest information

To keep up to date with the latest information, Yukoners should visit Yukon.ca.

May 8, 2020 – Update on COVID-19

Yukon’s Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Brendan Hanley has the following updates for the Yukon public on measures being taken in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

COVID-19 cases and recoveries

As of today, May 8, at 2 p.m. the case count remains at 11 cases of COVID-19 in the territory.

All of the 11 people who have contracted COVID-19 in Yukon have recovered. There are no active cases in the territory and 1,075 individuals have been tested.

We have traced each case in Yukon so far to its origin which means there continues to be no known community spread in the territory. We assume community spread has occurred when we can no longer trace how somebody became infected.

Daily updates

The Government of Yukon publishes information about COVID-19 tests daily on Yukon.ca. This includes how many confirmed cases there are in Yukon, how many tests have been negative, how many results are pending, the total number of tests and how many people have recovered.

Guidelines for health care professionals

We are providing guidelines to help health care practitioners who aren’t doctors and nurses to reopen their businesses in ways that will keep their clients safe. These practitioners are called allied health professionals and they include:

  • acupuncturists;
  • chiropractors;
  • naturopaths;
  • occupational therapists;
  • osteopaths;
  • physiotherapists; and
  • registered massage therapists.

Under the new guidelines, practitioners will call patients 24 hours before their appointment to screen them for COVID-19 and should maintain physical distancing when they meet patients in person.

Guidelines for optometrists

We are also providing guidelines for optometrists to help them provide services safely to Yukoners during the pandemic.

Health care workers

We do not require health care workers to self-isolate and avoid social gatherings when they’re not at work. However, we do ask them to comply with all current recommendations and orders, including holding any social gatherings outdoors and in a well-spaced grouping of not more than 10 people. 

Supporting fundraisers

We encourage Yukoners to find new ways to support charities or take part in fundraising activities during the pandemic. This is as long as people have the money or time to participate and activities are carried out safely.

Run for Mom, for example, which takes place on Mother’s Day, Sunday, May 10, is inviting Yukoners to run, walk or cycle any route they choose while practising safe spacing rather than take part in the usual annual run around the 4.2 kilometre Millennium Trail in Whitehorse.

Run for Mom is an annual event to raise awareness of breast health and money for breast imaging equipment at Whitehorse General Hospital.

Six steps to staying safe

The six steps to staying safe and stopping the spread of COVID-19 are: physical distancing; regular hand washing; staying home when sick; not gathering in groups of more than 10; avoiding unnecessary travel to communities and self-isolating when required.

Latest information

To keep up to date with the latest information, Yukoners should visit Yukon.ca.

May 5, 2020 – Update on COVID-19

Yukon’s Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Brendan Hanley has the following updates for the Yukon public on measures being taken in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

COVID-19 cases and recoveries

As of today, May 5, at 2 p.m. the case count remains at 11 cases of COVID-19 in the territory.

All of the 11 people who have contracted COVID-19 in Yukon have recovered. There are no active cases in the territory and 1,041 individuals have been tested.

We have traced each case in Yukon so far to its origin which means there continues to be no known community spread in the territory. We assume community spread has occurred when we can no longer trace how somebody became infected.

Daily updates

The Government of Yukon publishes information about COVID-19 tests daily on Yukon.ca. This includes how many confirmed cases there are in Yukon, how many tests have been negative, how many results are pending, the total number of tests and how many people have recovered.

Yukon modelling

Modelling shows that because Yukoners have followed the six steps to staying safe, we have successfully reduced the spread of COVID-19 in the territory. If we had not put restrictions in place when we did, our modelling shows we would have expected to have seen around 2,500 cases of COVID-19 by May 1. Instead we saw 11.

We would also have expected approximately 150 people to be in a hospital by May 1. No one in Yukon infected by COVID-19 has had to go to a hospital and, on average, there are 28 unoccupied hospital beds every day. If we’d had 10 cases and no restrictions, we could have seen more than 7,000 cases, with close to 1,000 hospitalizations.

We will provide a technical briefing about modelling in Yukon soon.

Pandemic impact on Yukoners

It’s vital that Yukoners continue to practise the six steps to staying safe. As a territory, we must take a long-term view of the pandemic and move gradually and in an evidence-based way that’s specific to Yukon circumstances towards easing restrictions so we can ensure we’re always prepared for any changes in our situation.

The COVID-19 pandemic is affecting everybody in different ways, depending on our circumstances and vulnerabilities. We cannot always anticipate how each of us will be affected. Yukoners can play a role in supporting others through this difficult experience as well as making sure we seek help for ourselves when we need it.

We must also balance our personal responses to the pandemic with the risks to other Yukoners’ health. Each safe action we take helps others who are vulnerable.

Spartan Cube machines

On April 17, 2020, we said we expected to receive the Spartan Cube machines we had ordered from the federal government around the end of May for portable, rapid testing around the territory. However, because of problems with the Spartan Cube’s performance, Health Canada will no longer be supplying the machines.

Six steps to staying safe

The six steps to staying safe and stopping the spread of COVID-19 are: physical distancing; regular hand washing; staying home when sick; not gathering in groups of more than 10; avoiding travel to communities and self-isolating when required.

Latest information

To keep up to date with the latest information, Yukoners should visit Yukon.ca.

May 1, 2020 – Update on COVID-19

Yukon’s Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Brendan Hanley has the following updates for the Yukon public on measures being taken in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

COVID-19 cases and recoveries

As of today, May 1, at 2 p.m. the case count remains at 11 cases of COVID-19 in the territory.

All of the 11 people who have contracted COVID-19 in Yukon have recovered. There are no active cases in the territory.

We have traced each case in Yukon so far to its origin which means there continues to be no known community spread in the territory. We assume community spread has occurred when we can no longer trace how somebody became infected.

The Government of Yukon publishes information about COVID-19 tests daily on Yukon.ca. This includes how many confirmed cases there are in Yukon, how many tests have been negative, how many results are pending, the total number of tests and how many people have recovered.

A personal message for Yukoners from the Chief Medical Officer of Health

I recognize that people are getting tired of the restrictions that have been put in place. They see Yukon’s low number of cases of infection and wonder why we are keeping things locked down so tightly. They look to our neighbours to the south and the east and see that other parts of Canada are beginning to open up.

Here in Yukon, while people feel we have taken drastic measures, we haven’t had to go as far as many of the provinces had to. When our neighbours to the south and east open up, their first phases will be catching up to where we are now in terms of restrictions.

We want to take a calm and measured approach to reopening the territory. More details will be coming week by week. We want to take incremental steps and, if it’s fine and we don’t see more disease, then walk in a little deeper.

The worst thing would be that if we open up, see a resurgence of the disease within the territory and have to shut down again, just after folks have tasted a little bit of freedom.

Increasing non-urgent hospital services

Yukon’s hospitals will on a limited basis increase some elective and non-urgent services that were temporarily suspended over the last month to help limit the spread of COVID-19. The services include elective surgeries and non-urgent bloodwork, x-rays, imaging tests, physiotherapy, occupational therapy and appointments with visiting specialists.

Hospitals will provide all of these resumed services by appointment only so they can maintain physical distancing and ensure the safety of vulnerable populations and health care workers. The hospitals will contact people to let them know when their appointment is. They will continue screening all patients and visitors for risk of infection at all hospital entrances.

Accessing mental health services

Looking after our mental health is part of how we should respond to the pandemic whatever our situation or role, including people who have never accessed mental health services before. Feeling afraid, worried or stressed are normal in a crisis and with all the change that COVID-19 has brought to our lives, so is feeling we’re no longer in control and grieving for what we have lost.

Reaching out for extra mental health support is a sign of strength. There are plenty of mental health professionals available to help and Yukoners are reminded they can call Mental Wellness and Substance Use Services at 867-456-3838 or toll free at 1-866-456-3838. People can also call the Canadian Mental Health Association for phone counselling appointments at 867-668-6429.

The Child Development Centre at 867-456-8182 provides services for families with children under school age. Families with children or adults with disabilities can call Disability Services at 867-393-7464.

We provide anyone coming into the territory with a list of resources and tools for self-care and mental wellness while they self-isolate.

People can find free resources for supporting mental health at the Wellness Together Canada at ca.portal.gs.

Six steps to staying safe

The six steps to staying safe and stopping the spread of COVID-19 are: physical distancing; regular hand washing; staying home when sick; not gathering in groups of more than 10; avoiding travel to communities and self-isolating when required.

Latest information

To keep up to date with the latest information, Yukoners should visit Yukon.ca.

April 28, 2020 – Update on COVID-19

Yukon’s Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Brendan Hanley has the following updates for the Yukon public on measures being taken in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

COVID-19 cases and recoveries

As of today, April 28, at 2 p.m. the case count remains at 11 cases of COVID-19 in the territory.

Eight of the 11 people who have contracted COVID-19 in Yukon have recovered and all others are doing well at home.

We can trace each case in Yukon so far to its origin which means there continues to be no known community spread in the territory. We assume community spread to have occurred when we can no longer trace how somebody became infected.

Daily updates

The Government of Yukon publishes information about COVID-19 tests daily on Yukon.ca. This includes how many confirmed cases there are in Yukon, how many tests have been negative, how many results are pending, the total number of tests and how many people have recovered.

Testing update

We shared the new testing criteria we announced on Friday, April 24, with health care professionals over the weekend. They have now increased testing for people who have a broader range of symptoms and who have travelled outside Yukon.

We’ve also opened up testing to people who have not travelled. This allows us to test people from vulnerable populations including residents in long-term care homes and marginalized citizens who struggle with housing and day-to-day living.

As we move towards lightening the current restrictions we’re living under, we need to have the appropriate testing capacity in place to watch for community spread and to know where infection is and track where it’s been.

National Immunization Awareness Week

April 25 to May 2 is National Immunization Awareness Week. We want Yukoners to keep routine immunizations for children up to date. Delaying or missing scheduled vaccines puts children at risk for common and serious childhood infections such as measles and whooping cough. Protecting babies and children through vaccinations and reducing the risk of an outbreak of a disease that’s preventable by a vaccine is a public health priority. We have strategies in place across all Yukon health care centres to continue to deliver these services safely.

Don’t put your health on hold

The government launched a new campaign this week to remind Yukon residents that if they’re ill, they can still call their doctor, visit the health centre or go to the Emergency Department. Numbers of physician, health centre and emergency visits have dropped in recent weeks and we’re concerned that people who may be really ill or have legitimate health concerns are putting off that call or visit because of COVID-19.

Lifting of restrictions

Work continues on developing a national, coordinated approach to how and when to gradually ease restrictions put in place in response to the pandemic. Recognizing the different situations in each jurisdiction, changes will be implemented locally based on local circumstances. Planning for Yukon’s opening up strategy is underway led by the Premier’s office and following a public health framework developed by the Chief Medical Officer of Health, in coordination with federal and jurisdictional counterparts.

Some Yukon businesses have begun to reopen on their own initiative after changing their practices to comply with current public health advice. Retail operations may remain open as long as they have a plan in place to serve the public safely. Other establishments, such as bars, restaurants except for take out and delivery, recreation facilities and businesses offering personal services, remain closed under public health order. All closures and operating requirements will be reviewed as part of Yukon’s opening plan.  

Businesses can view the cleaning guidelines that have been approved by the government’s environmental health services on Yukon.ca.

Social gatherings

The ban on gatherings of more than 10 people refers to social gatherings rather than work environments. People within a workplace must space themselves appropriately and take increased hygiene precautions. The maximum number of people in a work space depends on the size of the establishment and not the absolute number.

Indoor gatherings should be limited to usual household members and close family members and should not exceed 10 people. Outdoor gatherings of 10 or fewer are allowed as long as people are appropriately spaced.

Six steps to staying safe

The six steps to staying safe and stopping the spread of COVID-19 are: physical distancing; regular hand washing; staying home when sick; not gathering in groups of more than 10; avoiding travel to communities and self-isolating when required.

Latest information

To keep up to date with the latest information, Yukoners should visit Yukon.ca.

April 24, 2020 – Update on COVID-19

Yukon’s Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Brendan Hanley has the following updates for the Yukon public on measures being taken in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

COVID-19 cases and recoveries

As of today, April 24, at 3 p.m. the case count remains at 11 cases of COVID-19 in the territory.

Eight of the 11 people who have contracted COVID-19 in Yukon have recovered and all others are doing well at home. No one has had to go to a hospital.

Daily updates

Information about COVID-19 tests is published daily on Yukon.ca. This includes how many confirmed cases there are in Yukon, how many tests have been negative, how many results are pending, the total number of tests and how many people have recovered.

Changes to testing criteria

From Monday, April 27, the criteria for who is tested for COVID-19 in Yukon will be expanded. People will be tested if they have any one of the following symptoms and if they have travelled outside the territory in the last 14 days or have had close contact with anyone who has travelled outside the territory.

The symptoms for recent travellers include fever, chills, cough, difficulty breathing, a sore throat or hoarse voice, headache, runny nose or nasal congestion, unexplained vomiting or diarrhea, fatigue or muscle aches, or loss of smell or taste.

People with no travel history but who are experiencing fever, cough, or difficulty breathing can also be tested.

Testing will also be broadened in long-term care facility residents and the Whitehorse Emergency Shelter clients.

The reasons for broadening the testing criteria are that due to being well past the peak of flu season we are seeing fewer people come forward for testing. We wish to continue with high rates of testing to detect any COVID as early as possible. We also are working to continue to protect vulnerable populations and to increase our ability to detect signals of community transmission. Community transmission means it is no longer possible to trace how somebody became infected. The origin of all 11 cases in Yukon so far has been traced back to travel outside the territory.

Health care providers continue to have the discretion to make decisions about who is tested or not based on their clinical expertise.

The self-assessment tool on Yukon.ca and the 811 Health Line will be updated with the new criteria on April 27.

Doctor’s offices and community health centres

Yukoners are reminded they can call their doctor for their regular health needs such as renewing medication, dealing with chronic health conditions or to discuss new concerns. Doctor’s offices and community health centres remain open.

Health support for Yukon communities

Information about health services support for communities during the pandemic has been added to Yukon.ca, including health care access, mental health services and the testing process. 

Latest information

To keep up to date with the latest information, Yukoners should visit Yukon.ca.

April 22, 2020 – Update on COVID-19

COVID-19 cases and recoveries

As of today, April 22, at 3 p.m. the case count remains at 11 cases of COVID-19 in the territory.

Eight of the 11 people who have contracted COVID-19 in Yukon have recovered and all others are doing well at home.

Each case in Yukon so far can be traced to its origin and there continues to be no known community transmission in the territory. Community transmission is assumed to have occurred when it is no longer possible to trace how somebody became infected.

Daily updates

Information about COVID-19 tests is published daily on Yukon.ca. This includes how many confirmed cases there are in Yukon, how many tests have been negative, how many results are pending, the total number of tests and how many people have recovered.

Living with COVID-19 longer term

Work is underway across Canada to plan a national, coordinated approach to how and when to gradually ease restrictions put in place in response to the pandemic. The slow transition to living longer-term with COVID-19 will be tailored to different contexts and implemented by each jurisdiction based on local circumstances. 

Yukon’s Chief Medical Officer of Health is a member of the federal, provincial and territorial Special Advisory Committee set up to guide this work and advise deputy ministers of health across the country on matters related to the pandemic.

The committee’s work is based on data and evidence and includes developing criteria to assess readiness for loosening or altering public health measures and preparing a framework for guiding decisions.

Smoking and vaping

People who smoke and vape should be aware they are at increased risk of contracting COVID-19 and of developing more severe health complications if they become ill. Smoking and vaping damage the lungs and weaken the immune system, making it harder to fight off COVID-19. This includes smoking cannabis as well as tobacco. Also, sharing cigarettes or vaping devices risks spreading COVID-19.

Yukoners wanting to give up smoking can get help from the Quitpath program by calling 867-667-8393 in Whitehorse, 1-866-221-8393 toll free in communities or by visiting www.quitpath.ca. Help is also available at www.smokershelpline.ca.

Youth and mental health

Anxiety is a normal reaction to uncertainty and situations that can be harmful. Children and youth struggling with living through a pandemic are encouraged to talk to adults they trust, call Kids Help Phone toll free at 1-800-668-6868 or visit kidshelpphone.ca.

Parents, care givers and other adults can support children and youth by responding to questions and researching answers to factual questions together, thinking of ways to help others and setting achievable goals.

Six steps to staying safe

The six steps to staying safe and stopping the spread of COVID-19 are: physical distancing; regular hand washing; staying home when sick; not gathering in groups of 10 or more; avoiding travel to communities and self-isolating when required.

Latest information

To keep up to date with the latest information, Yukoners should visit Yukon.ca.

April 20, 2020 – Update on COVID-19

Yukon’s Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Brendan Hanley has the following updates for the Yukon public on measures being taken in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

COVID-19 cases and recoveries

As of today, April 20, at 3 p.m. there are two new cases of COVID-19 in the territory, bringing the total number of cases to 11. The new cases relate to a cluster in Whitehorse that is associated with international travel. Contact tracing and investigation continue.

Eight of the 11 people who have contracted COVID-19 in Yukon, including all people not involved in the present cluster, have recovered and all are doing well.

Each case in Yukon so far can be traced to its origin and there continues to be no known community transmission in the territory. Community transmission is assumed to have occurred when it is no longer possible to trace how somebody became infected.

Daily updates

Information about COVID-19 tests is published daily on Yukon.ca. This includes how many confirmed cases there are in Yukon, how many tests have been negative, how many results are pending, the total number of tests and how many people have recovered.

Contact tracing

Whenever new cases of COVID-19 occur in the territory that can be traced to a particular person, Yukon Communicable Disease Control will contact anyone who has had close contact with that person and let them know what steps they must take to avoid spreading infection, such as self-isolating and monitoring themselves for symptoms. Each person will be given direction according to their individual circumstances.

Travellers returning to Yukon

People returning to Yukon who are self-isolating for 14 days and who develop symptoms or whose symptoms worsen should call 811 or their family physician if they are in Whitehorse. People in communities who develop symptoms should call their local health centre.

Mental health support

Mental health should be a priority for Yukoners to help them manage their way through the pandemic. Reaching out for mental wellness support is proactive health care.

Advice for mental health self-care includes being kind to yourself, getting outside for at least 15 to 20 minutes a day, appreciating nature, eating well and staying hydrated, monitoring your caffeine and alcohol intake, getting eight hours of sleep a night and taking medications as prescribed.

Anyone seeking support can call Mental Wellness and Substance Use Services at 867-456-3838 or toll free at 1-866-456-3838. People can also call the Canadian Mental Health Association for phone counselling appointments at 867-668-6429.

Latest information

To keep up to date with the latest information, Yukoners should visit Yukon.ca.

April 17, 2020 – Update on COVID-19

Yukon’s Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Brendan Hanley has the following updates for the Yukon public on measures being taken in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

COVID-19 cases and recoveries

As of today, April 17, at 3 p.m. there is one new case of COVID-19 in the territory, bringing the total number of cases to nine. The new case is in Whitehorse and related to international travel. Contact tracing is underway.

Seven of the nine people who have contracted COVID-19 in Yukon have recovered and no one has had to go to a hospital.

Each case in Yukon so far can be traced to its origin and there continues to be no known community transmission in the territory. Community transmission is assumed to have occurred when it is no longer possible to trace how somebody became infected.

Information about COVID-19 tests is published on Yukon.ca. This includes how many confirmed cases there are in Yukon, how many tests have been negative, how many results are pending, the total number of tests and how many people have recovered.

Testing for COVID-19

Starting today, information about COVID-19 tests will be published daily on Yukon.ca.

Yukon continues to have an aggressive strategy for testing for COVID-19 but as the incidence of influenza and other respiratory illnesses lessens in the territory, fewer individuals need to be tested. Also, with fewer people coming into Yukon than before due to border restrictions, the risk of imported COVID-19 has substantially decreased.

The Chief Medical Officer of Health office is continually re-examining the testing strategy for Yukon to ensure there are mechanisms in place to protect the territory’s most vulnerable citizens as well as to look for signs of community transmission.

Rapid test kits

Within the next couple of weeks Yukon expects to have a GeneXpert rapid test kit set up and running.  This will be for testing within a  hospital setting rather than for general use and can provide results quickly on site. New Spartan Cube machines are also expected to arrive in Yukon around the end of May for portable, rapid testing in different health care settings around the territory.

The Government of Yukon will also continue to send tests to the BC Centre for Disease Control by air transport.

Communal living guidance

The Government of Yukon has produced a new guide to help operators prevent and manage COVID-19 in communal settings such as homeless shelters, women’s shelters, youth shelters, transition homes, group homes and hostels. The guidance includes topics such as education, cleaning, personal protective equipment and monitoring and reporting.

The document is called Guidance for the Prevention and Management of COVID-19 in Communal Living Settings and is now on Yukon.ca.

Keeping COVID-19 at bay

Yukoners have succeeded in creating an environment where COVID-19 has not spread and are strongly advised to keep it that way by following the six steps to staying safe. The six steps are: physical distancing; regular hand washing; staying home when sick; not gathering in groups of 10 or more; avoiding travel to communities and self-isolating when required.

Latest information

To keep up to date with the latest information, Yukoners should visit Yukon.ca.

April 14, 2020 – Update on COVID-19

Yukon’s Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Brendan Hanley has the following updates for the Yukon public on measures being taken in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

COVID-19 cases and recoveries

As of today, April 14, at 3 p.m. the number of cases of COVID-19 in Yukon remains at eight with seven cases in Whitehorse and one in a community.

Six of the eight people who have contracted COVID-19 in Yukon have recovered and no one has had to go to a hospital.

Each case in Yukon so far can be traced to its origin and there continues to be no known community transmission in the territory. Community transmission is presumed to occur when it is no longer possible to trace how somebody became infected.

Information about COVID-19 tests is published regularly on Yukon.ca. This includes how many confirmed cases there are in Yukon, how many tests have been negative, how many results are pending, the total number of tests and how many people have recovered.

Easter success

Yukoners are thanked for following the pandemic orders and recommendations over the Easter weekend and staying close to home, staying safe and not putting unnecessary pressure on medical and emergency services.

Six steps to staying safe

Although community transmission is not known to have reached the territory yet, it is possible that it has already arrived. This is why the public should continue to act to limit potential infection. By following six steps to staying safe, Yukoners will help to stop the spread of COVID-19.

  1. Practise physical distancing – keep two metres or six feet away from everyone who’s not in your household.
  2. Wash your hands frequently.
  3. Stay home when you’re sick.
  4. Don’t gather in groups of 10 or more people.
  5. Don’t travel to communities unless it’s essential.
  6. Self-isolate when you’re required to – either because you’ve travelled into the territory or because you are a contact of someone diagnosed with or being investigated for COVID-19.

Doctor appointments and immunizations

People who would normally be visiting health centres for immunizations should carry on doing so despite the pandemic. Those with ailments or conditions not related to COVID-19 should call their doctors for appointments in the usual way. They will be able to talk to their doctor by phone and their doctor will determine whether they need a face to face appointment.

Latest information

To keep up to date with the latest information, Yukoners should visit Yukon.ca.

April 8, 2020 – Update on COVID-19

Yukon’s Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Brendan Hanley has the following updates for the Yukon public on measures being taken in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

COVID-19 cases and recoveries

As of today, April 8, at 3 p.m. the number of cases of COVID-19 in Yukon is eight.

The eighth case is in a rural Yukon community. The patient is self-isolating and doing well at home. This case is linked to international travel.

Four of the eight people who have contracted COVID-19 in Yukon have now recovered and no one has had to go to a hospital.

Information about COVID-19 tests is published regularly on Yukon.ca. This includes how many confirmed cases there are in Yukon, how many tests have been negative, how many results are pending, the total number of tests and how many people have recovered.

Identifying rural communities where COVID-19 is present

When a case is diagnosed in a rural community, the Office of the Chief Medical Officer of Health will not publicly identify the community. This commitment is made for several reasons including the need to protect the personal health information and privacy of the individual and anyone affected.

Individual cases that are contained do not increase the risk to the public. There is concern that if communities are identified, the community or people who are affected may be stigmatized.

If there are specific places where contact may have occurred and contacts are unknown, those locations may need to be posted regardless of the community.

Easter weekend

Yukoners are reminded to do what they can to help stop the spread of COVID-19 over the Easter weekend so the territory remains free of known community transmission.

This means staying close to home, avoiding activities that risk the need for emergency services to be called out and keeping a safe, two-metre distance from anyone who’s not a member of the same household. People should do grocery and other shopping alone as much as possible and not play sports or games with people who are not from the same household.

However, Yukoners who are healthy and not self-isolating should not take this to mean they cannot see local family and friends who are not vulnerable to infection. Yukoners connecting with others should keep safely spaced at all times, practise greater hygiene and avoid gatherings of more than 10 people.

As announced on March 22, people are strongly advised not to travel to Yukon rural communities unless their journey is essential.

Playgrounds

Healthy Yukoners are also reminded that they may go to local parks and playgrounds to get fresh air and play as long as they keep safely spaced from anyone who’s not in their household. 

Doctor appointments

People with ailments or conditions not related to COVID-19 are encouraged to call their doctors for appointments in the usual way. They can talk to their doctor by phone and their doctor will determine whether a face to face appointment is necessary.

Anyone who thinks they have COVID-19 symptoms should call Yukon HealthLine 811 or use the COVID-19 self-assessment tool on Yukon.ca.

Schools

With face-to-face classes suspended for the rest of the school year, parents and caregivers are encouraged to help children continue to learn but in the role of a guide rather than putting pressure on themselves to step into the role of a teacher. 

Tips for supporting children at this challenging time include talking to them about COVID-19 while also restricting their access to online news about the pandemic, maintaining a regular daily structure and teaching children the basics of increased hygiene while not becoming upset if they forget.

Latest information

To keep up to date with the latest information, Yukoners should visit Yukon.ca.

April 6, 2020 – Update on COVID-19

Yukon’s Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Brendan Hanley has the following updates for the Yukon public on measures being taken in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

COVID-19 cases and recoveries

As of today, April 6, at 3 p.m. the number of cases of COVID-19 in Yukon is seven.

Four of the seven people who have contracted COVID-19 have now recovered and all others are isolating and doing well at home. No Yukon cases have required medical treatment.

Information about COVID-19 tests is published regularly on Yukon.ca. This includes how many confirmed cases there are in Yukon, how many tests have been negative, how many results are pending, the total number of tests and how many people have recovered.

Contact tracing

Whenever new cases of COVID-19 occur in the territory that can be traced to a particular person, the Government of Yukon will contact anyone who has had close contact with that individual. This is called contact tracing and is a normal, precautionary step in the response to any infectious disease, not just COVID-19.

Yukoners who have had close contact with someone who is infected will be notified individually and the steps they need to take will be explained to them directly, such as monitoring themselves for symptoms and self-isolating. The risk of infection is determined case by case by Yukon Communicable Disease Control.

COVID-19 transmission

Yukon continues to have no known cases of community transmission. All identified infections in the territory so far are connected to travel outside Yukon or to known contacts. Community transmission occurs when it is no longer possible to trace how somebody became infected. Physical spacing measures are people’s best protection against unknown community transmission.

With global information about COVID-19 growing each day there is now evidence that some infected people can transmit the virus before they develop symptoms and also that some people who never develop symptoms can also transmit the virus.

Personal protective equipment

Yukon is not facing a shortage of personal protective equipment (PPE). To help manage resources, PPE supplies in the territory have been centralized and health care workers are following protocols so that equipment is neither over-used nor under-used.

Supplies of medical masks must continue to be given to health care workers so they can wear them during medical procedures and when they care for people who are infected.

Wearing a non-medical mask such as a homemade cloth mask in the community has not been proven to protect the person wearing it. However, using non-medical mask or facial covering can be an additional measure people can take to protect others around them. It also helps people to be aware of not spreading infection and remember to not touch their face. Wearing a non-medical mask when in public or other settings is not a replacement for following proven measures such as hand washing and safe spacing.

Safe Easter recreation

Yukoners are strongly advised to choose less risky outdoor activities close to home this Easter weekend. The territory’s first responders and medical system workers need to be available to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic rather than attend to outdoor activity injuries.

Latest information

A range of information in response to people’s queries about the pandemic is being added today to Yukon.ca.

To keep up to date with the latest information, Yukoners are encouraged to visit Yukon.ca.

April 3, 2020 – Update on COVID-19

Yukon’s Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Brendan Hanley and Premier Silver have the following updates for the Yukon public on measures being taken in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

COVID-19 cases and recoveries

As of today, April 3, at 3 p.m. the number of cases of COVID-19 in Yukon remains at six.

Four of the six people who contracted COVID-19 have now recovered and all others are isolating and doing well at home. No Yukon cases have required medical treatment.

Yukon continues to have no documented cases of community transmission. All identified infections in the territory so far are connected to travel outside Yukon or to known contacts. Community transmission occurs when it is no longer possible to trace how somebody became infected. Physical spacing measures are people’s best protection against unknown community transmission.

Information about COVID-19 tests is published regularly on Yukon.ca. This includes how many confirmed cases there are in Yukon, how many tests have been negative, how many results are pending, the total number of tests and how many people have recovered.

Legal orders

As announced by the Government of Yukon on April 2, 2020, Yukoners should be aware that all orders put in place by the Yukon Chief Medical Officer in response to the pandemic are enforceable by law. This announcement about enforcement measures was in recognition of the vulnerability of communities throughout Yukon and will help clarify the rules for anyone who is uncertain about what they and others can and cannot legally do.

The enforceable orders require that: everyone who enters Yukon must self-isolate for 14 days; all essential services workers must self-isolate in a place other than a work camp or mine; all people entering Yukon must provide contact information and details of their self-isolation plan and declare they don’t have any COVID-19 symptoms; no more than 10 people can gather in the same place unless they live together; all restaurants that remain open must only provide take out; all bars must close; dental visits are limited to emergency only; and all personal service businesses such as hair salons, tattoo parlours and massage therapy must close.

Special provisions and requirements are now in place for critical service providers, people travelling through Yukon and people who live in the BC-Yukon border area who haven’t travelled out of the territory or border area in the last 14 days. Travellers are only allowed to be in Yukon for 24 hours as they pass through.

Recommendations

To help protect Yukoners since the start of the pandemic, the Chief Medical Officer of Health has made several strong recommendations as well as orders. These recommendations include: not travelling to rural communities or outside the territory unless it’s essential; practicing greater hygiene and always keeping at least two meters apart from others unless they’re part of the same household; working from home when possible; and avoiding non-essential treatment at hospitals. 

Hospital care

Yukoners are reminded that hospitals are still very safe places to seek care. If people need to see a doctor for their illness, medical condition or injury they should call 811 first. If they’re advised to go to Emergency then they should do so.

Yukoners should also be aware that no hospital visitors are allowed except in limited circumstances and that active screening is in place at the entrances to all hospitals. Screeners have the difficult but important job of ensuring people have access to urgent care and keeping everyone safe. This means they may have to redirect people to other health service or turn away visitors. This is not an easy measure to enforce and Yukoners are asked to be understanding that these steps are being taken to ensure everyone’s safety.

Rural communities

To help protect rural communities in Yukon from the pandemic, the Chief Medical Officer of Health also now strongly recommends that all service providers engage with local or municipal and First Nations governments before they enter any communities. A Government of Yukon team is being established to support this engagement.

Work is also underway to help ensure that Yukoners across the territory are kept up to date with COVID-19 developments and advice in a range of ways, in recognition that not everyone has easy access to online information.

Critical and essential services

To support orders and recommendations made by Yukon’s Chief Medical Officer of Health during the pandemic, the Government of Yukon has published guidelines that explain what critical and essential services are in the context of the pandemic and state the measures that businesses and workers must take to reduce the spread of COVID-19 in the territory.

Critical workers are defined as those whose services are necessary to preserve life, health and the basic running of society, such as health care, emergency services, energy, water and food.

Essential workers are defined as those whose services support the infrastructure needed for the health, safety and economic wellbeing of Yukoners, such as transportation, construction, and information and communication technologies.

The new guidelines also identify other services that are essential, for example, long-term care facility workers, child care workers, veterinarians and cleaning services.

Guidance on self-isolating

Yukoners who are self-isolating are reminded that they may go outdoors for fresh air or exercise and to carry out urgent errands such as collecting medication if no one else can do this for them, as long as they keep a distance of at least two meters – or six feet – from other people.

Safe spacing is not a law in Yukon but a strong recommendation and common sense during the pandemic. All Yukoners have a responsibility to help stop the spread of COVID-19 with the territory.

Latest information

To keep up to date with the latest information, Yukoners are encouraged to visit Yukon.ca.

April 1, 2020 – Update on COVID-19

Yukon’s Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Brendan Hanley has the following updates for the Yukon public on measures being taken in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

COVID-19 cases and recoveries

As of today, April 1, at 3 p.m. there are 6 cases of COVID-19 in Yukon. The new case is linked to international travel. The person followed all proper protocols, self-isolated and is recovering at home.

3 of the 6 people who contracted COVID-19 have now recovered and all others are doing well on home isolation.

Information about COVID-19 tests is published regularly on Yukon.ca. This includes how many confirmed cases there are in Yukon, how many tests have been negative, how many results are pending, the total number of tests and how many people have recovered.

Air travellers

Air North staff are greeting all travellers arriving at Erik Neilson Whitehorse International Airport with any airline to give them guidance and instruct them that they must self-isolate for 14 days and monitor themselves for symptoms. Passengers also receive guidance before they deplane and COVID-19 information is displayed on airport screens.

All people arriving in Yukon are ordered to go straight home and into self-isolation for 14 days. If they cannot safely self-isolate at home, they should contact COVID19info@gov.yk.ca to be linked with the team supporting people who cannot self-isolate at home.

Support for vulnerable people

Several measures are in place at the Government of Yukon’s Whitehorse Emergency Shelter to help keep guests and staff safe during the pandemic. This includes actively monitoring guests for symptoms of COVID-19 and reducing the number of people gathering in the shelter at the same time, while still providing essential services and prioritizing people who are most in need.

Whitehorse Emergency Shelter staff are also carrying out safe spacing and additional cleaning to prevent the spread of infection and are educating guests about physical distancing, increased hygiene and coughing etiquette. Staff have accommodation ready for guests who may need to isolate and are helping people who don’t require additional support to find alternative, temporary accommodation.

In addition, the Government of Yukon is sharing guidance and resources such as a screening tool with non-governmental organizations across the territory that provides services for homeless people and those at risk of homelessness so they can help protect clients, staff and volunteers.

Work camp guidelines

Guidelines have been issued for work camps during the pandemic, including how to help staff who have symptoms or who are required to self-isolate, how to practice safe spacing and enhanced hygiene, and how to handle food.

It is recommended that employers pay staff who need to self-isolate as this will help ensure that staff report any COVID-19 symptoms and follow isolation protocols. Mining camp workers arriving in Yukon are reminded that they are required to self-isolate for 14 days before they start work.

Latest information

To keep up to date with the latest information, Yukoners are encouraged to visit Yukon.ca.

March 30, 2020 – Update on COVID-19

Yukon’s Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Brendan Hanley has the following updates for the Yukon public on measures being taken in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

COVID-19 cases and test results

As of today, March 30, at 3 p.m. there are five cases of COVID-19 in Yukon. All five people are doing well at home.

Information about COVID-19 tests is published regularly on Yukon.ca. This includes how many confirmed cases there are in Yukon, how many tests have been negative, how many results are pending and the total number of tests.

Hospital preparedness

Whitehorse General Hospital continues to prepare for the pandemic. They are planning now on how to potentially accommodate a high volume of COVID-19 patients, including identifying other facilities where care could be provided. They are also putting physical distancing measures in place and planning for the effective management of resources such as staff, equipment and supplies.

Contact tracing

People who test positive for COVID-19 may have a history of a flight or flights within the preceding 14 days. In such cases, the Government of Yukon will use information from the airline, when available, to contact only the people on that flight who were sitting specifically within the range of the infected individual.

People identified within that range are directly contacted and required to monitor themselves for symptoms. If they develop symptoms they must immediately self-isolate and contact Yukon Communicable Disease Control. This is a precautionary approach to account for any possible transmission on flights and avoids the publication of flight information. When flight manifest information is not available, the public posting of flight information may be required.

Safe spacing

Keeping two metres apart from other people is one of the most effective ways to help stop the spread of COVID-19. This behaviour has been referred to as “social distancing” but this language is shifting to the phrases “physical distancing” and “safe spacing” as that wording is clearer and easier for people to visualize and act on.

Yukoners are reminded that other powerful ways to help stop the spread of COVID-19 are frequent handwashing, covering coughs and sneezes, and avoiding face touching.

Latest information

To keep up to date with the latest information, Yukoners are encouraged to visit Yukon.ca.

March 27, 2020 – Update on COVID-19

Yukon’s Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Brendan Hanley has the following updates for the Yukon public on measures being taken in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

COVID-19 cases and test results

As of today, March 27, at 3 p.m. there are four cases of COVID-19 in Yukon. All four people are doing well at home.

Information about COVID-19 tests is published regularly on Yukon.ca. This includes how many confirmed cases there are in Yukon, how many tests have been negative, how many results are pending and the total number of tests.

Managing COVID-19 cases

As new cases of COVID-19 occur, those who are connected to infected people will continue to be traced and informed so they can take the necessary measures of monitoring themselves for symptoms for up to 14 days.

Yukoners are urged to behave as if COVID-19 is already in their community. They should continue to keep a physical distance of two meters or six feet from each other and practice greater hygiene.

Yukoners are also strongly advised to avoid passing on inaccurate information they may hear about cases of infection. This creates additional anxiety at a time when many people are already struggling to maintain their mental health. 

Federal quarantine measures

As many Yukoners will know, the Government of Canada now requires mandatory 14-day self-isolation for everyone entering Canada even if they do not have COVID-19 symptoms.

Yukoners flying into Canada with symptoms must quarantine at their arrival destination. Yukoners flying into Canada who do not have symptoms may travel home to the territory where they must then follow Yukon requirements and self-isolate for 14 days.

Dental services

The Chief Medical Officer of Health is from today ordering the territory’s dental practices to suspend all non-urgent treatment until further notice. This is to protect Yukoners as well as dental care providers from the spread of infection.

Patients with queries should contact their dental clinic.

Mining industry guidance

Everyone arriving in Yukon must self-isolate for 14 days, including workers at placer or hard rock mines, exploration camps or conducting any other business or duty associated with the mining and exploration industry. Workers cannot carry out their regular duties in a camp or at a mine while they’re self-isolating.

Further guidance for the mining industry is on Yukon.ca.

March 25, 2020 – Update on COVID-19

Yukon’s Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Brendan Hanley has the following updates for the Yukon public on measures being taken in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

COVID-19 cases and test results

As of today, March 25, at 10 a.m. there are three cases of COVID-19 in Yukon.

This third case is related to travel outside of Yukon. The individual was tested on Monday, March 23 and test results were received this morning. The individual is doing well at home and contact tracing has begun.

Information about COVID-19 tests is published regularly on Yukon.ca. This includes how many confirmed cases there are in Yukon, how many test have been negative, how many results are pending and the total number of tests.

Services for hospital outpatients

Yukon hospitals are suspending all non-urgent or routine services from Thursday, March 26. This includes bloodwork and lab tests, x-rays, CT scans and other imaging services, physiotherapy and occupational therapy, and specialist appointments.

Yukoners should not go to a hospital for a non-urgent service, treatment or exam at this time. The hospitals continue to provide urgent emergency care.

These measures are being taken to help the hospitals make sure they have enough staff and resources to respond to the pandemic and ensure only those who need to be in hospital are in a hospital. These steps also support their efforts to stop the spread of COVID-19 – and practice physical distancing from each other.

Health care insurance

The Government of Yukon is extending the Health Care Insurance Plan to cover Yukon residents who are not able to return to the territory because of the pandemic. The usual requirement to be resident in Yukon for at least 180 days to qualify for health care insurance will be waived.

Respiratory assessment centre

The respiratory assessment centre in Whitehorse is now open to support people with acute respiratory illness such as influenza or COVID-19 who need medical assessment. Yukoners will be referred to the centre from 811, a family physician’s office, Yukon Communicable Disease Control or a hospital emergency department.

Self-isolation

Yukoners and any visitors are reminded they must self-isolate for 14 days as soon as they arrive in Yukon if they have travelled within Canada or internationally. People must not stop to get groceries or make visits but go straight home and then arrange the support they need.

Yukoners should also self-isolate if they have been identified as a close contact of someone diagnosed with COVID-19.

Self-isolation means staying at home for 14 days, monitoring for symptoms and avoiding close contact with other people when going outside for fresh air. The term “quarantine” is not used in Yukon, as it is used by the Public Health Agency of Canada to mean a mandatory restriction of movement in a location determined by that agency.

Yukon.ca

Yukon.ca continues to be the central place to find information about the territory’s response to COVID-19 and is regularly updated to provide support for Yukoners. Yukoners are reminded to use the online assessment tool on Yukon.ca if they have concerns about COVID-19.

March 22, 2020 – Update on COVID-19

Yukon’s Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Brendan Hanley has the following updates on measures being taken in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

COVID-19 cases

As of today, March 22, at 7 p.m. there are 2 cases of COVID-19 in Yukon.

COVID-19 test results

Yukon is now seeing a faster turnaround time on COVID-19 test results. By early this coming week, the number of completed tests on Yukon.ca will be updated 3 times a week.

Non-essential travel outside of territory and into rural Yukon

In an effort to limit the spread of COVID-19 and to protect Yukon’s most vulnerable citizens, Yukon’s Chief Medical Officer of Health strongly advises the suspension of all non-essential travel into and out of Yukon. All Yukoners planning to return home in the next 30 days are advised to return now.

In view of the need to protect remote areas with limited medical resources, Yukon’s Chief Medical Officer of Health strongly advises the suspension of any non-essential travel to Yukon’s rural communities,

Self-isolation required for all travellers

All Yukoners returning home and all visitors to the territory are required to self-isolate for 14 days. This includes anyone returning home from other provinces and territories by road or air, as well as Yukoners returning home by road from Alaska. We are putting mechanisms in place to monitor and ensure travellers are self-isolating.

If you cannot safely self-isolate at home, email covid19info@gov.yk.ca for information and advice. All Yukoners who return home and have respiratory symptoms (cough, fever or difficulty breathing) are asked to phone 811 to get advice on COVID-19 testing.

Restaurants and bars

Restaurants must immediately reduce their seating capacity to 50%, space people 2 metres apart, and prepare to offer take-out and delivery service only as of opening on March 26. As of closing time tonight, March 22, all bars must close until further notice.

All personal service establishments must close by end of day, Wednesday, March 25. This includes hair salons, barber shops, tattoo parlours, nail salons and massage therapists.

Gatherings

Gatherings of more than 10 people are banned. Smaller gatherings should ensure spacing of 2 metres between people. Yukoners should not attend any social gatherings, even those with fewer than 10 people if:

  • you have any flu-like symptoms at all;
  • you are over 65 years of age or have an underlying health condition; or
  • you work in healthcare, a healthcare facility or other essential services.

March 19, 2020 – Health supports, hospitals and child care programs

Yukon’s Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Brendan Hanley has the following updates for the Yukon public on measures being taken in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

COVID-19 cases

As of today, March 20, at 9:30 a.m. there are no cases of COVID-19 in Yukon.

COVID-19 test results

Yukon is now receiving COVID-19 test results back from BC more quickly. For now, we will be publishing how many tests have been completed on Yukon.ca on a weekly basis. Information about first cases would be shared with Yukoners as soon as possible. 

Hospital visits

Whitehorse General Hospital will suspend all scheduled, non-urgent surgery procedures from Monday, March 23, 2020. They will continue to provide surgical care for urgent and emergency cases. Anyone with an appointment will be contacted individually by the hospital to let them know and to help them with any questions.

Yukoners may also be aware that no visitors are allowed at the territory’s three hospitals with limited exceptions. Screening is in place at all hospitals, asking anyone coming to hospital about the reason for their visit, symptoms and travel history.

Child care programs

Day cares and child care centres do not need to close. Child care programs are considered to be an essential service that should remain in place as long as possible. They provide access to social supports particularly for vulnerable children and families and for parents who are themselves providing essential services to help keep Yukoners safe. Daycare operators have been briefed on safe social distancing measures within a daycare environment.

811 changes coming

In the coming day or so, people calling 811 for COVID-19 advice will have two options:

they will be able speak to the Public Health Agency of Canada; or
if they have COVID-19 symptoms and have travelled internationally within the last 14 days, or if they have symptoms and have come in contact with an individual with a confirmed case of COVID-19, they can speak to staff at Yukon Communicable Disease Control (YCDC).

The symptoms of COVID-19 include a fever, cough or shortness of breath, or difficulty breathing.

People can also still call 811 for non-COVID-19 health advice in the usual way.

Self-assessment tool

Yukoners are reminded that they can now access an online self-assessment tool on Yukon.ca if they have concerns about COVID-19.

Information on Yukon.ca continues to be expanded to provide support for Yukoners. Yukon.ca is the central place to find information about the territory’s response to COVID-19.

Respiratory assessment centre

As announced on Thursday, March 19, the Government of Yukon is setting up a respiratory assessment centre in Whitehorse for people with acute respiratory illness such as influenza or COVID-19 who need medical assessment. 

March 18, 2020 – Chief Medical Officer of Health declares public health emergency

Dr. Brendan Hanley, Yukon’s Chief Medical Officer of Health, today declared a public health emergency under section 4.3 of the Public Health and Safety Act.

This declaration enables the Chief Medical Officer of Health to respond more quickly to the rapidly changing situation and to ensure the health and safety of Yukoners. The public health emergency will be in effect until further notice.

This declaration comes with new public health measures aimed at protecting Yukoners and limiting the spread of COVID-19:

  • Classes are suspended at all Yukon public schools until April 15, or until further notice.
  • All public indoor recreational facilities are required to close until further notice. This includes the Canada Games Centre, ice rinks, and recreation centres.
  • All three Yukon hospitals are closed to visitors, with limited exceptions.
  • Libraries are closed until further notice.

March 16, 2020 – Updates on travel and mass gathering

Yukon’s Chief Medical Officer of Health is telling all individuals who have travelled outside of Canada in the last 14 days to self-isolate. This includes travel to Alaska.

Individuals who have travelled outside of Yukon in the last 14 days, or who are feeling sick, are banned from visiting hospitals.

Long-term care facilities are closed to visitors and volunteers, unless family members are at the end of life or gravely ill regardless of travel.  

These restrictions are accompanied by several others including the following:

  • Mass gatherings of more than 50 people are banned, including at houses of worship.
  • Parents or caregivers who are able to keep their children home from spring break daycamps, or daycare, are requested to do so. Fewer children in camps or daycares will help to limit any spread.
  • People who can work from home are requested to do so. Employers are asked to look for ways to support employees to work from home where possible.

Many of us are interested in how COVID-19 is spread from one person to another. As an emerging disease, there are many uncertainties about its characteristics.  The information that we communicate today is the best knowledge at this time. This knowledge does change and get out of date rapidly, and we are keeping updated and adjusting our response accordingly. We must all be cautious and patient as the information changes.

Current evidence supports that the main route of COVID-19 spread is from person-to-person through respiratory droplets when an infected person sneezes or coughs. The risk of transmission is believed to be highest when the person is most symptomatic. However recent evidence and modelling suggests that transmission may occur prior to symptoms being present.  Major uncertainties remain in the role that asymptomatic transmission may play in the spread of COVID-19.

At this time in Yukon, we are recommending self-isolation for all travellers from international destinations, even those without symptoms. This precautionary measure is important as we are working with an illness that is not fully understood. 

All people returning from international travel should self-isolate for 14 days. This means that they should stay home or in the outdoors where they can be 2 metres away from other people. See the Government of Canada webpage for more information.

We are asking all people throughout Yukon to do their part to keep Yukon healthy. Please continue to practise good hand hygiene and cough etiquette. Please be especially considerate of people over 65 years old and people who have underlying medical conditions who are at highest risk of severe complications of respiratory infections including influenza and COVID-19.

Persons who are returning from travel outside Canada and have any cough or sensation of fever, even mild, should consider themselves infectious and be extra cautious with their self-isolation and distancing from those at highest risk of severe infection.  In that case please self-isolate and call YCDC at 867-667-8323 or 1-800-661-0408 ext. 8323.

The situation with COVID-19 is fluid and we continue to update our guidance based on the latest information.  We will continue to provide the public regular updates as the situation continues to evolve.

Yours in health,

Dr. Catherine Elliott, MD FRCPC

March 11, 2020 – Coronavirus updates

There have been many questions from Yukoners today who attended, live closely with, or work with someone who attended the Prospectors and Developers Association of Canada conference in Toronto from March 1 to 4, 2020.

Yukoners who attended the conference may have been exposed to COVID-19. Symptoms of COVID-19 include a cough, fever or shortness of breath. If you don’t have these symptoms, then you can go about your regular day-to-day activities. This includes attending work, classes, events and other activities. However, if you develop any of the symptoms listed above, then please stay home and contact Yukon Communicable Disease Control at 1-867-667-8323 to arrange for testing.

It is important to remember people who have no symptoms cannot pass COVID-19 on to others.

It is normal for people to be afraid of contagious diseases. We all want to protect our families, friends and communities. However, fear can cause us to make unwise decisions like spreading misinformation, or hoarding food and medications.

Please remember that the risk of COVID-19 infection for Yukoners remains low, and the majority of individuals who contract the disease will have mild symptoms. We will continue to provide regular updates as the situation evolves.

Yours in health,

Dr. Catherine Elliott, MD FRCPC

March 7, 2020 – Cancellation of 2020 Arctic Winter Games

It is out of an abundance of caution that today, as the Chief Medical Officer of Health, responsible for public health in Yukon, I have recommended the cancellation of the 2020 Arctic Winter Games that were scheduled to be held here in Whitehorse beginning next week.

I am making this recommendation out of concern for the health and safety of Yukoners, of all athletes and delegates and for their home communities throughout the circumpolar North.

COVID-19 is a contagious disease that spreads from person to person rapidly through respiratory secretions. In a setting like the Arctic Winter Games, where people are sleeping, eating and playing together in such close quarters, the potential to spread is amplified greatly. Even in the absence of COVID-19 here, a single suspected case would have serious impacts. For example, a person with a cough who has travelled to the games would need to be tested and isolated while awaiting results. The necessity for rapid and rigorous public health response, for the individual, for the contacts, diagnosis and isolation while waiting for even a negative result, the potential for fear, concern here and throughout the North, these would be challenging in the setting of Arctic Winter Games in Whitehorse.

The possibility of importation of the disease is changing and raises much uncertainty. While there is no case of COVID-19 in Yukon, other places are seeing community spread with no explanation of how or why. We have been surprised by cases in BC, Alberta and Washington State that have no links to diagnosed cases nor travel history to affected areas. The global spread of COVID-19 has been faster and more uncertain than many of us have expected and we must take the necessary steps to protect ourselves, our citizens and others.

In Yukon, we are already responding to the potential threat of COVID-19. We are taking advantage of this time when the risk is low to mobilize our public health response and our preparedness for potential impacts on acute care services. We are actively monitoring for cases, leveraging existing influenza surveillance systems. We are ready to ensure excellent medical care in a way that protects the health of our population should COVID-19 arrive here.

It is with a heavy heart that I make this recommendation. The Arctic Winter Games is an event that brings together so many northerners from across Canada and other circumpolar regions to celebrate sport, art and culture. It demonstrates the beauty, strength and cohesion of northern peoples. This beauty, strength and cohesion must remain strong through today’s announcement and the coming days.

Catherine Elliott, MD MHSc FRCPC

Trusted sources of information

Chief Medical Officer of Health
Previous updates on coronavirus

Government of Yukon
Information about COVID-19 for Yukoners
Seasonal influenza information
Yukon HealthLine (dial 811)

BC Centre for Disease Control
Information on coronavirus

Government of Canada
COVID-19: outbreak update
COVID-19: travel advice
Toll free: 1-833-784-4397
Email: phac.info.aspc@canada.ca

World Health Organization (WHO)
COVID-19 outbreak