Information current

August 13, 2020

We're in Phase 3 of lifting COVID-19 restrictions. Watch the latest video update.

For non-medical questions, email covid19info@gov.yk.ca or phone 1-877-374-0425.

For medical questions or if you feel ill, phone 811, or launch the COVID-19 self-assessment tool.

Common questions: COVID-19 in Yukon

Find answers in the themes below to commonly asked questions about COVID-19 in Yukon. We update this information as the COVID-19 pandemic situation evolves. Find the latest information about COVID-19 in Yukon

Yukon's public health emergency

On March 18, 2020, Yukon's Chief Medical Officer of Health declared a public health emergency. This declaration enables the Chief Medical Officer of Health to:

  • respond more quickly to the rapidly changing situation; and
  • ensure the health and safety of Yukoners.

The public health emergency will be in effect until further notice.

COVID-19 symptoms

You should get tested if you have any of the following symptoms:

  • fever/chills;
  • cough;
  • shortness of breath;
  • runny nose;
  • sore throat;
  • headache;
  • loss of sense of taste or smell;
  • headache;
  • fatigue;
  • loss of appetite;
  • nausea and vomiting;
  • diarrhea; and
  • muscle aches.

Use the online COVID-19 self-assessment tool if you think you may have COVID-19.

Arriving in Yukon?

Yukon, British Columbia, Nunavut and Northwest Territories residents

You do not have to self-isolate if you have not travelled outside:

  • Yukon;
  • British Columbia;
  • Nunavut; and
  • Northwest Territories.

If you travelled outside of these 4 regions, you will have to self-isolate.

Residents of other parts of Canada

You must self-isolate for 14 days when you arrive in Yukon. This applies even if you've spent the previous 14 days in British Columbia, Nunavut or Northwest Territories. 

Find out how to self-isolate.

Who has to self-isolate when they arrive in Yukon?

Arriving in Yukon?

Yukon, British Columbia, Nunavut and Northwest Territories residents

You do not have to self-isolate if you have not travelled outside:

  • Yukon;
  • British Columbia;
  • Nunavut; and
  • Northwest Territories.

If you travelled outside of these 4 regions, you will have to self-isolate.

Residents of other parts of Canada

You must self-isolate for 14 days when you arrive in Yukon. This applies even if you've spent the previous 14 days in British Columbia, Nunavut or Northwest Territories. 

If you develop symptoms of COVID-19

Self-isolate and:

Find out how to self-isolate.

Testing and a vaccine

Getting tested for COVID-19

You should get tested for COVID-19 if you have COVID-19 symptoms. Always phone 811 before going anywhere to get tested.

Find out about symptoms of COVID-19.

Where to get tested

Only people who meet the screening criteria for COVID-19 will be tested.

In communities:

Phone your local health centre to arrange for testing. Find a community health centre.

In Whitehorse:

Phone 811 or your family physician.

Test results

You’ll receive your test results within 2 to 5 days of being tested.

Assessing yourself for COVID-19

If you think you may have COVID-19, use the online self-assessment tool.

COVID-19 vaccine

No vaccine for COVID-19 exists. It can take years to develop a vaccine for a new disease and produce enough of it for the populations that need them.

If you received a flu vaccine, it will not protect you against a coronavirus. No natural health products are certified to treat or protect you against COVID-19.

Schools

Public schools are on track to resume face-to-face classes

Face-to-face classes were suspended for the remainder of the 2019‒20 school year. 

The Government of Yukon is planning for Yukon Kindergarten to Grade 12 students to return to face-to-face classes in public schools for the start of the 2020‒21 school year.

Schools are planning their operations based on initial health and safety guidance and detailed health and safety guidelines that will be set by the Chief Medical Officer of Health.  

Trusted information about COVID-19
Mental health and wellness support

The COVID-19 pandemic means different things for everyone. When faced with an ongoing traumatic situation out of their control, all people have a strong emotional response. However, our ability to cope will vary depending on resources, both internal and external.

Find mental health and wellness support during COVID-19.

Do not hesitate to make use of these services – this is a stressful time and talking to someone about it can help.

Animals, wild meat and COVID-19

Spread of COVID-19 between animals and people

A small number of dogs and cats in several countries have tested positive for COVID-19 or antibodies to the virus. In addition, the virus has been detected in tigers and lions in zoo collections, as well as in farmed mink in Europe. Some positive animals have had symptoms of respiratory disease, but typically these are mild and not fatal. All cases are presumed to be due to exposure to infected people (for example, transmission from infected people to animals).

COVID-19 (SARS-CoV-2) is in the family of viruses that caused the SARS outbreak in 2003. Research on COVID-19 has examined animals known to have cell receptors that allow infection by SARS viruses including cats, ferrets and pigs. Cats, hamsters and ferrets can be infected, develop illness and can pass the virus to other animals of the same species through direct contact. Dogs are apparently less susceptible, and pigs, ducks and geese have not been positive.

There’s no evidence that animals play a significant role in spread of COVID-19. People with COVID-19 should exercise precautions to avoid spreading the virus to pets, especially cats, hamsters and ferrets. Testing animals in Canada is not recommended at this time, but may be performed in exceptional situations. Veterinarians must consult with the Chief Veterinary Officer for guidance on animal testing.

You have COVID-19: contact with animals

It’s plausible that the virus could survive on the hair of animals as it can on other surfaces. It’s recommended that if you’ve been diagnosed with COVID-19 and you have a pet or other animal:

  • avoid close contact with them (for example, do not let them lick you, sit in your lap or sleep on your bed);
  • practise good cough etiquette; cover your mouth or nose with a tissue  or cough or sneeze into your upper arm or elbow (avoid sneezing or coughing on your animals);
  • have someone else care for your animals;
  • if someone else cannot care for your animals, always wash your hands before and after touching or feeding them; and
  • limit your animal’s contact with other people and animals.​

Livestock and COVID-19

If you own livestock owners practice normal biosecurity measures. This includes limiting visitors or workers who may have travelled to, or been in contact with, someone from a COVID-19 affected area. For more information about on-farm disease prevention, producers are encouraged to consult:

  • the National Biosecurity Standards and Biosecurity Principles, and
  • the National Farm-Level Biosecurity Planning Guide.

Food and COVID-19

There is currently no evidence to suggest that food is a likely source or route of transmission of the virus. This includes meat from livestock or Yukon wildlife. Keep yourself and your family safe when handing any food:

  • follow food safety practices.
  • avoid contamination of uncooked foods.
  • avoid consuming raw or undercooked animal products.

Bringing animals to Canada from another country

The Public Health Agency of Canada recommends that you limit or postpone the importation of animals from affected areas. This includes importers, rescue organizations, and adoptive families. If you import animals from an affected area:

  • they should be closely monitored for signs of illness; and
  • you should contact a veterinarian if they become sick; phone ahead to ensure your veterinarian is aware of the circumstances.

All animals entering Canada must meet import requirements set out by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA). There are currently no specific requirements in place in Canada restricting the import of animals related to the COVID-19 outbreak.

Veterinary clinics

Veterinary clinics in Yukon are currently open but are taking measures that allow for social distancing. These include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • reducing hours;
  • limiting the number of clients in the clinic at any given time; and
  • postponing non-emergency appointments.

Phone your veterinary clinic to find out more.

More information on animals and COVID-19

World Health Organization

Canadian Veterinary Medical Association

Centres for Disease Control and Prevention

Public Health Agency of Canada

Community health centres and hospitals

What health centres are doing to protect the community

All community health centres are open. To visit your health centre:

  • follow the instructions posted outside or on the front door of your community health centre; and
  • whenever possible, phone ahead to book an appointment. 

You'll be asked COVID-19-related screening questions about your symptoms and recent travel by a greeter or administrative assistant when you:

  • arrive at the health centre; or
  • phone the centre.

If you have any symptoms, you’ll be asked to wash your hands and put on a mask.
You’ll be asked to wait in a specific area at the health centre or, if the centre is busy, you may be asked to wait in your vehicle until a nurse is available.

Visiting someone in the hospital, or going to an appointment

Screening is in place at all hospitals. If you go to a hospital you’ll be asked about:

  • the reason for your visit;
  • your symptoms; and
  • your travel history.

There are restrictions on visitors to the territory’s 3 hospitals. Get up-to-date information about hospital restrictions.

Contact your community health centre

Find the contact information of all Yukon community health centres and hospitals.

Driver medical examination exemption period

Medical examination certificate deadline extended: commercial drivers and drivers 70 years of age

We signed a new Ministerial Order under the Civil Emergency Measures Act. This order allows for the extension of the timeline to provide the certificate. It also means that drivers who cannot provide the medical certificate at this time will not be penalized.

How we're notifying affected drivers

  • Press release announcing and detailing the changes
  • Sharing this information on social media and on Yukon.ca.
  • Reaching out to commercial drivers through the Yukon Transportation Association.

New deadline

Until September 27, 2020.

Affected drivers will have this period to become compliant with the law and provide a medical examination certificate.

On March 18, the Yukon Medical Association advised Motor Vehicles that physician offices would not be booking driver medical examinations for the foreseeable future. The Ministerial Order is retroactive to that date. This decision affects all classes of licences (commercial and seniors 70 years of age and older).

The effect on commercial drivers

Over the next 6 months, from April to September, 835 commercial drivers will be affected.

Driver 70 years of age and older: driver’s exam or eye exam

To comply with physical distancing measures, driving tests are currently suspended. New licence applications that require a road test are not being processed. The Motor Vehicles office is still able to conduct vision tests at the office for licence renewals.

Exception: suspension removed

If a driver’s licence was suspended after March 18, 2020, but before the declared state of emergency on March 27, 2020, and the only reason for the suspension was that the person did not file a medical examination certificate, these suspensions have been automatically removed.

Suspension remains in place

Your will continue to be suspended if:

  • you were non-compliant; or
  • your licence was suspended before the start of the exemption period.

Expiring licences

If your licence expires, you'll still need to renew it. Our offices are following the chief medical officer of health's recommendations for physical distancing. We ask that you do not renew your licence in person.

You can renew your drivers’ licence:

  • over the phone;
  • by email; or
  • fax.

If you have to provide a medical examination certificate at the same time that your licence expires, we'll waive the requirement until the public health emergency has been lifted.

Long-haul truckers or drivers who are driving in other jurisdictions

These drivers will still have a valid licence, provided it has not expired. The Ministerial Order has temporarily disabled the medical requirements. The licences of drivers who must file medical exam certificates, but have not yet been able to, are not being automatically suspended. Once the public health emergency has been lifted, these drivers will have a grace period to bring themselves into compliance with the act.

Driver 70 years of age and older: driver’s exam or eye exam

To comply with physical distancing measures, driving tests are currently suspended. New licence applications that require a road test are not being processed. The Motor Vehicles office is still able to conduct vision tests at the office for licence renewals.

Events and gatherings

Avoid public gatherings

Attending even small gatherings increases the risk of exposure to COVID-19. You could can pass on the virus to vulnerable friends and family, particularly seniors, Elders and people with existing health conditions.

Participating in cultural gatherings

We acknowledge the significance of cultural gatherings in our communities. There are lingering negative memories and trauma caused by a history of banning cultural activities.

Gatherings have limits

  • Indoor gatherings of people in your social bubble are limited to 15 people.
  • Indoor gatherings of people outside your social bubble are limited to 10 people who must socially distance.
  • Outdoor seated gatherings are limited to 50 people who must socially distance.
  • Outdoor standing gatherings are limited to 100 people who must socially distance.

This is to protect public health, especially that of Elders and people with chronic diseases.

Communities are encouraged to consider alternatives, such as:

  • holding smaller events now; and
  • postponing the larger events until a later date.

If you're organizing an event, read the guidance about how to organize an event safely. You can also email us: covid19info@gov.yk.ca.

Types of cultural gatherings

These can include: sweat lodges, potlatches, ceremonies and other gatherings

Holding a small event

  • Consider having bag lunches rather than shared meals.
  • Ensure there are opportunities to wash or sanitize hands.
  • Practise social distancing.

Sweat lodge ceremony

The implications of sweat lodge ceremonies for viral transmission of COVID-19 are unknown. We ask that you proceed with caution.

Attending a funeral

  • Practise safe social distancing at a funeral.
  • If travelling from outside Yukon, British Columbia, Northwest Territories or Nunavut to a funeral in Yukon you’ll have to self-isolate for 14 days.
  • If travelling to a funeral outside Yukon, find out what the regulations to self-isolate are at your destination.

Death

There is currently no known risk associated with being in the same room at a funeral or visitation service with the body of someone who died of COVID-19.

The virus spreads primarily through droplets of bodily fluid produced when an infected person coughs or sneezes, similar to how a cold or flu spreads. This type of spread is not a concern after death.

If you have questions about funerals, email covid19info@gov.yk.ca. A member of our staff will phone you back to talk about your situation.

Read out guidelines for funerals and death care services during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Get funding for fixed costs: Yukon Business Relief Program

The purpose of the Yukon Business Relief Program

The Yukon Business Relief Program (YBRP) helps Yukon businesses that are experiencing significantly reduced revenues due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The program provides funding to cover specific fixed costs to help businesses survive and be in a position to resume normal business activities when the threat to public health eases.

When is the program deadline?

The Yukon Business Relief Program was extended to July 31. This is so we can continue our partnership with CanNor’s Northern Business Relief Fund.

How to apply

A business applies through Yukon government for support from either or both programs. This coordination happens automatically provided the business, on its application form, has permitted information sharing between the 2 governments.

How are applications assessed?

For expenses during the May 23 – July 23 extension period, applications will be assessed for support under CanNor’s Northern Business Relief Fund. Expenses not eligible for CanNor support will be assessed for payment by the Yukon Business Relief Program. Applications for June and July must demonstrate revenue loss in each month for which support is being sought.

How to show eligibility

You need to show 1 month of 30 per cent revenue loss (March, April and May 2020).

Which businesses are eligible?

This program is open to Yukon businesses, including home-based businesses, that have faced a minimum of 30 per cent loss in gross revenue due to the COVID-19 pandemic. A Yukon Business means a business that meets 3 of the following criteria:

  • has an office with a physical address in Yukon;
  • is subject to the Yukon Income Tax Act;
  • is registered as per the Business Corporations Act or the Partnership and Business Name Act, where applicable; and/or
  • has a valid municipal business license, where applicable.

What if you owe money to the Government of Yukon?

A business that owes money to Government of Yukon is eligible for this support.

Who qualifies for 75 per cent or 100 per cent reimbursement of costs?

100 per cent

Certain businesses with high levels of public contact, such as restaurants and retail, as well as those ordered to close by the Chief Medical Officer of Health.

75 per cent

Other businesses qualify for this amount. Please contact the Department of Economic Development for the reimbursement specific to your business.

Which organizations are ineligible?

The following organizations are excluded from this program:

  • Government of Yukon and its corporations;
  • Government of Canada and its corporations;
  • Yukon First Nation governments and their corporations;
  • municipalities;
  • religious organizations; and
  • not-for-profits.

This program also excludes businesses that belong to any of the following industries as classified under the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS):

  • finance and insurance;
  • real estate;
  • utilities;
  • telecommunications; and
  • mines.

What if you recently started your business?

Your new business is eligible if it was in operation by March 1, 2020, and meets the criteria for being a Yukon business. If your business operated for less than 1 year, a month-to-month comparison can be used to show the 30 per cent revenue drop. For example, February to March 2020, March to April 2020, April to May 2020, May to June 2020, or June to July 2020.

Eligible costs

This program covers the following fixed costs essential to business continuity:

  • commercial rent or lease for physical business location;
  • water, sewage and waste disposal;
  • electricity and heating fuel;
  • telephone, cable, internet and satellite;
  • software, data services, and subscriptions;
  • business insurance; and
  • pest control.

Eligible costs for home-based businesses:

  • Mortgage interest or rent costs accepted by the Canada Revenue Agency as attributable to the operation of the home-based business.
  • Home-based businesses must provide proof of “business use-of-home expenses deductions” as accepted by the Canada Revenue Agency. For example, portion of rent, property insurance, utilities and interest on mortgages deducted under the business use-of-home expenses, from their 2018 tax filings.
  • New home-based businesses without 2018 tax filings may provide 2019 tax filing documentation as proof of eligibility.

Ineligible costs

  • Mortgage principle payments for home businesses
  • Vehicle or equipment lease payment
  • Any costs that have already been covered by insurance
  • Any expense not listed under eligible costs covered by the program
  • Bank fees
  • Business mortgage and interest
  • Taxes you paid on eligible expenses

Prepare your application

How to demonstrate 30 per cent loss in revenue

Documentation you'll need

Submit your income statements for the months in question. Include items such as those listed below.

Utilities and other bills

If you haven’t received certain bills, submit your bill from the previous month as an estimate.

Rent

We can accept your April and May invoices. You do not have to calculate rent for a period of days.

Quarterly billing period

If you pay bills on a quarterly basis, we'll use the best proxy you have available such as expenses for previous quarter(s) or annual averages. Contact the department for guidance specific to your business

Insurance payment an annual basis

We'll calculate your pro-rated amount as the yearly amount divided by 12 months. You'll be reimbursed for the monthly equivalent.

What if you're unable to show revenue loss with income statements?

You may be able to provide other documentation showing decreased business of at least 30 per cent. Accommodations and tourism businesses, for example, can demonstrate decreased business through the number of reservations. Contact the department for guidance specific to your business.

Home-based business

Home-based businesses must provide proof of “business use-of-home expenses deductions” as accepted by the Canada Revenue Agency. For example, a portion of rent, property insurance, utilities and interest on mortgages deducted under the business use of home expenses from their 2018 tax filings. New home-based businesses without 2018 tax filings may provide 2019 tax filing documentation as proof of eligibility.

Periods of time to compare to show revenue loss

March 22 – May 23

You need to show revenue drop in 1 of those months.

May 24 – July 23

You must show the revenue drop for each month you're claiming expenses. This change is to verify there's been a sustained drop in revenue.

2 ways to show revenue loss over time:

  • A decline in 1 month in 2020 compared to the same month in 2019
  • A single month’s decline, from the month previous, for March through July, 2020.

Seasonal businesses: fixed costs but no revenue March – May, 2020

Seasonal businesses can qualify if their number of bookings (for future business during their operating season) decreased by 30 per cent.

How to apply

A single application can cover all months. If you were approved for March – May costs, you'll need to show a continued drop in revenue in June and July when you submit costs for those months. You do not need to submit another application.

What if you do not know your vendor ID

Leave this section blank and we can complete it up for you.

Learn more and apply.

Applying to other COVID-19 funding programs

You can apply to the Yukon Business Relief Program and the Canadian Emergency Wage Subsidy. Talk to your accounting professional for information on tax implications specific to your business.

Other funding options

We're collecting applications for the Northern Business Relief Fund administered by the Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency (CanNor). This program also pays certain fixed expenses but has different eligibility criteria and benefits that may be a better fit for your business. To discuss other Government of Yukon and Government of Canada supports you may qualify for, contact the department for guidance specific to your business.

If you have questions, email ecdev@gov.yk.ca or phone 867-456-3803, toll free in Yukon 1-800-661-0408 extension 3803.

Landlord and tenant supports
Residential renters and landlords

A new Ministerial Order supports tenants who:

  • may have to follow a COVID-19 health-protection measure after June 25, 2020; or
  • owe back rent due to COVID-19 loss of income from March 26 to June 25, 2020.

The order includes the following:

  • a landlord may not evict a tenant if they breach the tenancy agreement or the Residential Landlord and Tenant Act because they are subject to a health-protection measure;
  • a landlord may not enter a rental unit while the tenant or someone in their household is under a health-protection measure;
  • a tenant may end their tenancy early with 30 days' notice if they're unable to pay rent because of COVID-19 loss of income;
  • as of July 1, 2020, a tenant must pay rent as per the tenancy agreement, unless they're under a health-protection measure; and
  • a tenant must pay their rent arrears to their landlord by December 31, 2020.

Paying rent arrears

  • A tenant who accrues rent arrears because they're subject to a health-protection measure after June 25, 2020, has until December 31, 2020 to repay.
  • If a tenant who is not subject to a health-protection measure accrues rent arrears after June 25, 2020, the landlord may serve them with a notice to end tenancy.
  • A tenant who has accrued rent from March 26 to June 25, 2020 because they or a member of their household were under a health-protection measure or because of loss of income due to COVID-19, has until December 31, 2020 to repay.

What happens if a tenant or a member of their household has COVID-19?

If a tenant or a member of their household becomes subject to a health-protection measure, the tenant must immediately notify the landlord and provide the following information:

  • state that they're subject to a health-protection measure;
  • the date that they expect the health-protection measure to be lifted; and
  • any change to the above.

If a tenant is unable to pay rent on time because they are subject to a health-protection, they must immediately notify their landlord by providing them with following information:

  • the tenant is unable to pay rent because they are subject to a health-protection measure;
  • the measures that the tenant is taking to access other sources of income;
  • the date when the tenant expects to be able to pay the rent; and
  • any change to the above.

What is a health-protection measure?

A health-protection measure means any of the following as it relates to a tenant or a member of the tenant’s household and COVID-19:

  • a quarantine of the person;
  • a restriction on the movement of the person or class of people, to and from the rental unit ‒ a health officer imposes the measure under the Public Health and Safety Act;
  • a restriction of a person's movement if it's recommended by or is under the authority of the Chief Medical Officer of Health or the Chief Public Health Officer ‒ it does not include physical distancing; and
  • hospitalization of the person.

Can the landlord ask for proof?

A landlord may ask a tenant to provide evidence that is “reasonable.”

The landlord cannot ask a tenant to provide a certificate issued by a doctor or nurse practitioner. The purpose of this is to not overload the medical system.

If the landlord is not satisfied with the evidence, they can apply to the Residential Tenancies Office for a determination whether a term of the Ministerial Order applies.

What if the landlord doesn’t believe that the regulation should apply to the tenancy?

The landlord may apply to the Residential Tenancies Office for an exemption.

Entry by the landlord into a unit

If a tenant gives a landlord notice that they or a member of their household is under a health-protection measure, the landlord cannot enter the rental unit unless:

  • the landlord has an order from the Residential Tenancies Office;
  • the tenant appears to have abandoned the rental unit; or
  • there's an emergency and it's necessary for the landlord to enter the rental unit to protect life or property.

Late payment of rent after June 25, 2020

What the tenant must do if they're under a COVID-19 health-protection measure

The tenant must pay the unpaid rent as soon as they're able to, or by December 31, 2020 – whichever comes 1st.

The tenant may end the tenancy early by giving the landlord 30 days' notice.

Unless the tenant is under a health-protection measure, all rent that's due as of July 1, 2020, must be paid in full as per the residential tenancy agreement.

What about filing applications for dispute resolution?

If a landlord serves a tenant with a notice to end tenancy for cause and the tenant is subject to a health-protection measure within 4 days of receiving it then all the deadlines are suspended. This is until the until the tenant is no longer subject to a health-protection measure.

If a landlord serves a tenant with a notice to end tenancy without cause and the tenant is subject to a health-protection measure within 9 days of receiving the notice then all deadlines are suspended. This is until the tenant is no longer subject to a health-protection measure. Tenants may dispute evictions suspended in this way once they are no longer subject to a health-protection measure.

What happens if a tenant is under a health-protection measure when their tenancy ends?

A tenant who is subject to a health-protection measure at the same time as their tenancy is set to end, may stay in the rental unit until 4 days after they are no longer subject to a health-protection measure. They must pay rent on a prorated basis for the time that they are overholding.

What about serving documents?

If 1 party has the email address for another, they may serve documents by sending them to that email.

The documents will be considered served:

  • either the earliest date that the party confirms receipt by email; or
  • 5 days after it was sent.

How long will this order be in effect for?

It will be in effect until the COVID-19 state of emergency ends.

Paid leave program

10-day Paid Sick Leave Rebate for employers and the self-employed

Reimburses employers who pay their employees to:

  • take sick days; and
  • self-isolate.

It's in effect from March 11, 2020, to September 11, 2020.

Find out about the Paid Sick Leave Rebate for employers, workers and self-employed.

Protecting yourself and others

Get posters and materials to increase awareness and prevent the spread of COVID-19. 

How to prevent the spread of COVID-19

Follow the 6 steps to staying safe.

Also:

  • avoid close contact with people who are sick;
  • clean and disinfect objects and surfaces that are touched often;
  • cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze, then throw the tissue immediately into the trash; and
  • cover your mouth and nose with your inner elbow when you cough or sneeze.

How to reduce the risk of potential complications from COVID-19

Stay as healthy as possible now. For example, stop smoking or vaping and get the seasonal flu shot. You should also manage chronic illnesses such as diabetes with help from your doctor.

Remember you can still phone your doctor for your regular health needs or to discuss new concerns. Doctors offices and community health centre are open. 

Using bleach or alcohol as cleaners

Get information on cleaning and disinfecting your home or workplace.

Using a humidifier

The benefits of a humidifier may depend on your existing health condition. Ask your health care professional for advice.

About COVID-19

Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses. Some cause illness in people and others cause illness in animals.

Human coronaviruses are common and are typically associated with mild illnesses similar to the common cold. Rarely, animal coronaviruses can infect people. More rarely, these can then spread from person to person through close contact. For more information about animal to human transmission.

COVID-19 is a new disease that has not been previously identified in humans. The World Health Organization declared the COVID-19 pandemic. The “19” in the name of the virus indicates the year the virus appeared.

How COVID-19 spreads

COVID-19 is a type of coronavirus. Coronaviruses are most commonly spread from someone who’s infected through:

  • respiratory droplets generated when you cough or sneeze;
  • close, prolonged personal contact, such as touching or shaking hands; or
  • touching something with the virus on it, then touching your mouth, nose or eyes before washing your hands.

What is community spread?

Community spread is when we cannot trace how someone became infected. For example, a person does not have a history of travel or a connection to someone who is infected with COVID-19. Sometimes we talk about community transmission. This means the same as community spread.

How long does the virus lasts on surfaces?

We do not know for certain how long COVID-19 virus survives on surfaces. Early information suggests that the COVID-19 virus may last on surfaces for a few hours or several days depending on different conditions.

To protect yourself, use good hygiene measures and regularly clean and disinfect surfaces.

Food and COVID-19

There’s currently no evidence to suggest that food is a likely source or route of transmission of the virus. This includes meat from livestock or Yukon wildlife.

Keep yourself and your family safe when handing any food:

  • follow food safety practices;
  • cook food to safe temperatures;
  • avoid contamination of uncooked foods; and
  • avoid consuming raw or undercooked animal products.
Keeping staff and clients safe: support for employers

Keep your employees safe from COVID-19

  • Enforce safe-spacing measures in the workplace.
  • Encourage and support employees to work from home, if possible.
  • Undertake routine environmental cleaning (download information on cleaning and disinfecting the workplace and cleaning and disinfecting your home).
  • Promote respiratory etiquette.
  • Promote regular hand-washing. Download 1 of our hand-washing signs to post as a reminder.
  • Encourage and support staff to stay home when they’re sick.
  • Support staff and clients returning to Yukon.

Review the guidelines for the delivery of critical, essential and other services in Yukon communities.

Other guidance

  • People who can work from home are asked to do so.
  • Employers are asked to look for ways to support employees to work from home, where possible.
  • Continue to practise good hand hygiene at your place of work.
  • Continue to keep your place of work clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces often.
  • Employees who’ve returned from travel outside of the territory have to self-isolate for 14 days and should not be working.

Read about essential services in Yukon during COVID-19.

Read about critical services in Yukon during COVID-19.

For more information check the Government of Canada’s Risk Informed Decision Making

Find information about supports for employees, businesses and resources on how to maintain a safe workplace.

Find information about supports available for Yukoners.

Keeping work camps stay safe

The Government of Yukon has guidelines for work camps operating during the COVID-19 pandemic

What you can do

  • Be sure to provide staff and camp residents access to the most up-to-date and accurate information about COVID-19.
  • Ensure all staff and camp residents are informed of the infection prevention and control measures being implemented in the camp to help reduce and minimize the risk of potential disease transmission in the camp.
  • Inform the staff and camp residents of procedures to follow should they become sick.
  • We advise that employees do not work when they are sick.
  • Employers should not require the worker to provide a doctor’s note for sick leave if they are sick or are required to self-isolate.

Remuneration for isolating employees

We recommend that employers provide remuneration to employees who are on isolation precautions. This should be provided throughout the duration of self isolation. This will help to ensure that people who are sick will:

  • report their symptoms; and
  • follow to isolation protocols.

Concern: a mine or employer near your community brings in employees from out of territory

Miners coming to work in the territory have to self-isolate for 14 days upon entering Yukon. Mines facilitate this in hotels in Whitehorse. The Office of the Chief Medical Officer of Health and the Department of Energy, Mines and Resources are working closely with the individual mines. Each mine must be evaluated to assess levels of risk and determine if operations can continue in a safe manner.

People at most risk

There's an increased risk for more severe outcomes in people:

  • 65 years or older;
  • who have compromised immune systems; or
  • who have underlying medical conditions.
Risks for infants, pregnancy and people who use drugs or alcohol

What is the risk for infants?

Recent evidence suggests the risk to infants is low – very few children under 5 show serious illness from COVID-19, though they are not immune.

What are the risks for pregnant women?

We do not currently know if pregnant women have a greater chance of getting sick from COVID-19 than the general public nor whether they are more likely to have serious illness as a result.

Pregnant women experience changes in their bodies that may increase their risk of some infections. With viruses from the same family as COVID-19, and other viral respiratory infections, such as influenza, women have had a higher risk of developing severe illness. It is always important for pregnant women to protect themselves from illnesses.

What are the risks for people who use drugs or alcohol?

See the BC Centre for Centre for Disease Control’s website for more information about people who use drugs or alcohol and COVID-19.

Safe spacing and self-isolation

Safe spacing 

When someone coughs or sneezes they spray small liquid droplets from their nose or mouth. These droplets may contain the virus. If you’re too close and the person has the COVID-19 virus, you may contract it.

Safe spacing means making changes in your everyday routines to minimize close contact with others.

  • avoid common greetings, such as handshakes and hugs;
  • limit contact with people at higher risk such as older adults and people in poor health; and
  • keep a distance of at least 2 metres (6 feet) from anyone who’s not in your household or your combined household.

Self-isolation

You must monitor yourself for symptoms if you’re self-isolating because you:

  • travelled outside Yukon, British Columbia, the Northwest Territories or Nunavut; or
  • had contact with someone infected with COVID-19

If you develop symptoms:

Phone 911 if you’re having a medical emergency.

Get more information about self-isolation.

Travel and borders

The Chief Medical Officer of Health is telling all people who travelled outside of Yukon, British Columbia, Northwest Territories and Nunavut to self-isolate for 14 days when they arrive in Yukon. 

You'll need to:

  • monitor your health for fever, cough or difficulty breathing; and
  • follow healthy respiratory practices.

If you do develop symptoms within 14 days:

  • continue to isolate yourself from others;
  • phone a health care provider;
  • tell your health care provider about your symptoms and travel history; and
  • your health care provider will provide advice on what you should do.

In communities outside Whitehorse:

Phone your local health centre to arrange for testing.

In Whitehorse:

Phone 811 or your family physician. If your symptoms become severe and you need immediate medical care phone 911.

Border enforcement

Every person arriving at a Yukon border has to stop at a checkpoint. Find information about border enforcement.

Residents leaving Yukon

Choosing not to travel outside Yukon is the best way to protect yourself, your family, and our communities from the spread of COVID-19. If you have plans to travel, consider cancelling or postponing your trip.

Yukoners abroad

Yukon residents currently outside of Canada should find out what commercial options are available to return to home. They should consider returning as soon as possible.

Although it’s not advised, if you’re still considering travel outside of Canada, you should do the following:

  • check travel advisories before travelling;
  • know the health risks for your destination;
  • understand the risks to your safety and security abroad;
  • ensure you have sufficient finances and necessities, including medication, in case your travels are disrupted; and
  • be prepared if airlines revise scheduled flights to and from your destination.

If you travel abroad:

  • you’ll be subject to the measures of other countries;
  • your scheduled trip may become much longer;
  • you may have reduced access to quality health care; and
  • your travel health insurance will likely not provide coverage in a pandemic.

The Chief Medical Officer of Health would also like to reiterate that you should avoid all travel on cruise ships due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Find out about financial assistance for Yukoners abroad.

Travel within Yukon

The Chief Medical Officer of Health advises you be respectful of community members’ requests when entering a community or a business.

Find out more about travelling to communities.

Public gatherings of more than 50 people have been banned. Yukoners should not attend any social gatherings if they have:

  • any flu-like symptoms; or
  • an underlying health condition.

Concern: community members bringing the virus back into community

People who choose to travel outside of Yukon, British Columbia, Northwest Territories and Nunavut have to self-isolate for 14 days upon returning to Yukon. Outdoor gatherings of 50 people or more are banned in Yukon.

When travelling and at home, people need to be extra diligent with preventative practices:

  • wash your hands often;
  • use hand sanitizer if soap and water are not available; and
  • avoid touching your face.

Find more information about travel during COVID-19.

Virtual Town Hall questions and answers

In May 2020, we invited the public to send in questions about the COVID-19 pandemic for Premier Sandy Silver and Yukon Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Brendan Hanley to answer at a Virtual Town Hall on May 29. There was not time for them to answer all the questions during the event so we've published the remaining questions and answers for you to read.  

Yukon nominees and employers

Information for nominees

Job loss because of COVID-19: will your permanent residence application be affected

Lay-offs caused by COVID-19 will not affect either your Yukon Nominee Program status or impact your permanent residency application for the duration of the state of emergency. You do need to contact the Yukon Immigration Unit.

Laid-off: do you qualify for Employment Insurance?

The Government of Canada administers Employment Insurance benefits. Phone toll free 1-800-206-7218 to find out if you're eligible.

Laid-off: work permit is about to expire

Contact our office immediately. If your work permit or nomination is going to expire during the state of emergency, we'll issue you a support letter to extend your work permit so you can maintain legal status in Canada.

Information for employers

Your nominee signed a Tri-Partite Agreement: affecting on the 35 to 40 hours per week agreement

To give businesses more flexibility during the pandemic, the usual 35 ro 40 hour obligation for nominees has been waived. If you need to reduce hours for all staff and the nominee’s work hours are also affected, please keep track of this reduction of hours. If your nominee is laid-off, please notify our office.

Laying off staff: what to do about current nominees

Nominees who lose their employment during the state of emergency will remain in the program without penalty. After the state of emergency has ended they will be given 90 days to return to their previous employer or find a new employer.

Application in process to sponsor an overseas nominee: how to proceed

Applications will still be accepted as long as:

  • you have not laid off any Canadian citizens or permanent residents; and
  • your operations are continuing as usual.

Before your assessment we'll confirm that:

  • you're continuing to recruit domestically; and
  • you wish to proceed with the application.

Current territorial travel restrictions mean only essential and critical workers can enter Yukon by road or air. Monitor our website for updates to this information. Federal travel restrictions may affect a worker wanting to enter Canada.

Laying off a nominee: rehiring

If you lay off your nominee, you can rehire them. No new application will be required.

Application in process: putting it on hold

We can hold applications for employers waiting to determine how their operations will be affected by the state of emergency. To have your application put on hold, please phone or email us as soon as possible.

Nominee arriving in Yukon: employer responsibilities

Anyone entering Canada is required to self-isolate upon arrival. Employers cannot prevent workers from meeting these requirements.

During self-isolation, the employer:

  • has to pay the worker regular pay and benefits for the self-isolation period;
  • cannot make any payroll deductions related to self-isolation measures;
  • has to provide accommodation that meets all self-isolation requirements, including alternate accommodation (for example, hotel) if the requirements cannot otherwise be met; and
  • must monitor the worker’s health on a daily basis by phone or email, and report any symptoms to the appropriate authority.

The worker cannot be asked to perform any duties during the self-isolation period.

If the nominee has symptoms they must self-isolate in the 1st city they arrive in Canada. If they do not have symptoms (asymptomatic) they can travel to their final destination and self-isolate there.

Information for foreign nationals

Applying to the Yukon Nominee Program: lost your job, or cannot find a job

To be eligible for the Yukon Nominee Program, you will need a job offer from an employer. Then, the employer will apply to the program to hire you.

On a study permit: can you work full time?

Restrictions on employment are handled by the Government of Canada. Find more information about working in Canada if you're on a study permit.

More information

How the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is affecting immigration, refugees, citizenship and passport services.

Frequently asked questions: Changes to the Temporary Foreign Worker program regarding COVID-19

For questions about this or other immigration issues email yukon.nominee@gov.yk.ca, or phone 867-667-5131, toll free in Yukon 1-800-661-0407 extension 5131.

Wearing a face mask

If you have signs of a respiratory infection, you’ll be asked to wear a mask in a health facility, such as a:

  • hospital;
  • health centre; or
  • continuing care home.

Homemade or cloth masks

Wearing a homemade or cloth mask is not a substitute for safe spacing. If you’re wearing a mask, you must still keep 2 metres (6 feet) away from people who are not in your household bubble.

Wearing a mask at Yukon airports

You have to wear a non-medical mask in Yukon airport terminals and buildings. 

Where we recommend you wear a non-medical mask

The Chief Medical Officer of Health recommends that people wear non-medical masks in certain situations

Medical masks

Supplies of medical masks must continue to be given to health care workers so they can wear them;

  • during medical procedures; and
  • when they care for people who are infected.

Find out more about non-medical masks.

On March 18, 2020, Yukon's Chief Medical Officer of Health declared a public health emergency. This declaration enables the Chief Medical Officer of Health to:

  • respond more quickly to the rapidly changing situation; and
  • ensure the health and safety of Yukoners.

The public health emergency will be in effect until further notice.

You should get tested if you have any of the following symptoms:

  • fever/chills;
  • cough;
  • shortness of breath;
  • runny nose;
  • sore throat;
  • headache;
  • loss of sense of taste or smell;
  • headache;
  • fatigue;
  • loss of appetite;
  • nausea and vomiting;
  • diarrhea; and
  • muscle aches.

Use the online COVID-19 self-assessment tool if you think you may have COVID-19.

Arriving in Yukon?

Yukon, British Columbia, Nunavut and Northwest Territories residents

You do not have to self-isolate if you have not travelled outside:

  • Yukon;
  • British Columbia;
  • Nunavut; and
  • Northwest Territories.

If you travelled outside of these 4 regions, you will have to self-isolate.

Residents of other parts of Canada

You must self-isolate for 14 days when you arrive in Yukon. This applies even if you've spent the previous 14 days in British Columbia, Nunavut or Northwest Territories. 

Find out how to self-isolate.

Arriving in Yukon?

Yukon, British Columbia, Nunavut and Northwest Territories residents

You do not have to self-isolate if you have not travelled outside:

  • Yukon;
  • British Columbia;
  • Nunavut; and
  • Northwest Territories.

If you travelled outside of these 4 regions, you will have to self-isolate.

Residents of other parts of Canada

You must self-isolate for 14 days when you arrive in Yukon. This applies even if you've spent the previous 14 days in British Columbia, Nunavut or Northwest Territories. 

If you develop symptoms of COVID-19

Self-isolate and:

Find out how to self-isolate.

Getting tested for COVID-19

You should get tested for COVID-19 if you have COVID-19 symptoms. Always phone 811 before going anywhere to get tested.

Find out about symptoms of COVID-19.

Where to get tested

Only people who meet the screening criteria for COVID-19 will be tested.

In communities:

Phone your local health centre to arrange for testing. Find a community health centre.

In Whitehorse:

Phone 811 or your family physician.

Test results

You’ll receive your test results within 2 to 5 days of being tested.

Assessing yourself for COVID-19

If you think you may have COVID-19, use the online self-assessment tool.

COVID-19 vaccine

No vaccine for COVID-19 exists. It can take years to develop a vaccine for a new disease and produce enough of it for the populations that need them.

If you received a flu vaccine, it will not protect you against a coronavirus. No natural health products are certified to treat or protect you against COVID-19.

Public schools are on track to resume face-to-face classes

Face-to-face classes were suspended for the remainder of the 2019‒20 school year. 

The Government of Yukon is planning for Yukon Kindergarten to Grade 12 students to return to face-to-face classes in public schools for the start of the 2020‒21 school year.

Schools are planning their operations based on initial health and safety guidance and detailed health and safety guidelines that will be set by the Chief Medical Officer of Health.  

The COVID-19 pandemic means different things for everyone. When faced with an ongoing traumatic situation out of their control, all people have a strong emotional response. However, our ability to cope will vary depending on resources, both internal and external.

Find mental health and wellness support during COVID-19.

Do not hesitate to make use of these services – this is a stressful time and talking to someone about it can help.

Spread of COVID-19 between animals and people

A small number of dogs and cats in several countries have tested positive for COVID-19 or antibodies to the virus. In addition, the virus has been detected in tigers and lions in zoo collections, as well as in farmed mink in Europe. Some positive animals have had symptoms of respiratory disease, but typically these are mild and not fatal. All cases are presumed to be due to exposure to infected people (for example, transmission from infected people to animals).

COVID-19 (SARS-CoV-2) is in the family of viruses that caused the SARS outbreak in 2003. Research on COVID-19 has examined animals known to have cell receptors that allow infection by SARS viruses including cats, ferrets and pigs. Cats, hamsters and ferrets can be infected, develop illness and can pass the virus to other animals of the same species through direct contact. Dogs are apparently less susceptible, and pigs, ducks and geese have not been positive.

There’s no evidence that animals play a significant role in spread of COVID-19. People with COVID-19 should exercise precautions to avoid spreading the virus to pets, especially cats, hamsters and ferrets. Testing animals in Canada is not recommended at this time, but may be performed in exceptional situations. Veterinarians must consult with the Chief Veterinary Officer for guidance on animal testing.

You have COVID-19: contact with animals

It’s plausible that the virus could survive on the hair of animals as it can on other surfaces. It’s recommended that if you’ve been diagnosed with COVID-19 and you have a pet or other animal:

  • avoid close contact with them (for example, do not let them lick you, sit in your lap or sleep on your bed);
  • practise good cough etiquette; cover your mouth or nose with a tissue  or cough or sneeze into your upper arm or elbow (avoid sneezing or coughing on your animals);
  • have someone else care for your animals;
  • if someone else cannot care for your animals, always wash your hands before and after touching or feeding them; and
  • limit your animal’s contact with other people and animals.​

Livestock and COVID-19

If you own livestock owners practice normal biosecurity measures. This includes limiting visitors or workers who may have travelled to, or been in contact with, someone from a COVID-19 affected area. For more information about on-farm disease prevention, producers are encouraged to consult:

  • the National Biosecurity Standards and Biosecurity Principles, and
  • the National Farm-Level Biosecurity Planning Guide.

Food and COVID-19

There is currently no evidence to suggest that food is a likely source or route of transmission of the virus. This includes meat from livestock or Yukon wildlife. Keep yourself and your family safe when handing any food:

  • follow food safety practices.
  • avoid contamination of uncooked foods.
  • avoid consuming raw or undercooked animal products.

Bringing animals to Canada from another country

The Public Health Agency of Canada recommends that you limit or postpone the importation of animals from affected areas. This includes importers, rescue organizations, and adoptive families. If you import animals from an affected area:

  • they should be closely monitored for signs of illness; and
  • you should contact a veterinarian if they become sick; phone ahead to ensure your veterinarian is aware of the circumstances.

All animals entering Canada must meet import requirements set out by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA). There are currently no specific requirements in place in Canada restricting the import of animals related to the COVID-19 outbreak.

Veterinary clinics

Veterinary clinics in Yukon are currently open but are taking measures that allow for social distancing. These include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • reducing hours;
  • limiting the number of clients in the clinic at any given time; and
  • postponing non-emergency appointments.

Phone your veterinary clinic to find out more.

More information on animals and COVID-19

World Health Organization

Canadian Veterinary Medical Association

Centres for Disease Control and Prevention

Public Health Agency of Canada

What health centres are doing to protect the community

All community health centres are open. To visit your health centre:

  • follow the instructions posted outside or on the front door of your community health centre; and
  • whenever possible, phone ahead to book an appointment. 

You'll be asked COVID-19-related screening questions about your symptoms and recent travel by a greeter or administrative assistant when you:

  • arrive at the health centre; or
  • phone the centre.

If you have any symptoms, you’ll be asked to wash your hands and put on a mask.
You’ll be asked to wait in a specific area at the health centre or, if the centre is busy, you may be asked to wait in your vehicle until a nurse is available.

Visiting someone in the hospital, or going to an appointment

Screening is in place at all hospitals. If you go to a hospital you’ll be asked about:

  • the reason for your visit;
  • your symptoms; and
  • your travel history.

There are restrictions on visitors to the territory’s 3 hospitals. Get up-to-date information about hospital restrictions.

Contact your community health centre

Find the contact information of all Yukon community health centres and hospitals.

Medical examination certificate deadline extended: commercial drivers and drivers 70 years of age

We signed a new Ministerial Order under the Civil Emergency Measures Act. This order allows for the extension of the timeline to provide the certificate. It also means that drivers who cannot provide the medical certificate at this time will not be penalized.

How we're notifying affected drivers

  • Press release announcing and detailing the changes
  • Sharing this information on social media and on Yukon.ca.
  • Reaching out to commercial drivers through the Yukon Transportation Association.

New deadline

Until September 27, 2020.

Affected drivers will have this period to become compliant with the law and provide a medical examination certificate.

On March 18, the Yukon Medical Association advised Motor Vehicles that physician offices would not be booking driver medical examinations for the foreseeable future. The Ministerial Order is retroactive to that date. This decision affects all classes of licences (commercial and seniors 70 years of age and older).

The effect on commercial drivers

Over the next 6 months, from April to September, 835 commercial drivers will be affected.

Driver 70 years of age and older: driver’s exam or eye exam

To comply with physical distancing measures, driving tests are currently suspended. New licence applications that require a road test are not being processed. The Motor Vehicles office is still able to conduct vision tests at the office for licence renewals.

Exception: suspension removed

If a driver’s licence was suspended after March 18, 2020, but before the declared state of emergency on March 27, 2020, and the only reason for the suspension was that the person did not file a medical examination certificate, these suspensions have been automatically removed.

Suspension remains in place

Your will continue to be suspended if:

  • you were non-compliant; or
  • your licence was suspended before the start of the exemption period.

Expiring licences

If your licence expires, you'll still need to renew it. Our offices are following the chief medical officer of health's recommendations for physical distancing. We ask that you do not renew your licence in person.

You can renew your drivers’ licence:

  • over the phone;
  • by email; or
  • fax.

If you have to provide a medical examination certificate at the same time that your licence expires, we'll waive the requirement until the public health emergency has been lifted.

Long-haul truckers or drivers who are driving in other jurisdictions

These drivers will still have a valid licence, provided it has not expired. The Ministerial Order has temporarily disabled the medical requirements. The licences of drivers who must file medical exam certificates, but have not yet been able to, are not being automatically suspended. Once the public health emergency has been lifted, these drivers will have a grace period to bring themselves into compliance with the act.

Driver 70 years of age and older: driver’s exam or eye exam

To comply with physical distancing measures, driving tests are currently suspended. New licence applications that require a road test are not being processed. The Motor Vehicles office is still able to conduct vision tests at the office for licence renewals.

Avoid public gatherings

Attending even small gatherings increases the risk of exposure to COVID-19. You could can pass on the virus to vulnerable friends and family, particularly seniors, Elders and people with existing health conditions.

Participating in cultural gatherings

We acknowledge the significance of cultural gatherings in our communities. There are lingering negative memories and trauma caused by a history of banning cultural activities.

Gatherings have limits

  • Indoor gatherings of people in your social bubble are limited to 15 people.
  • Indoor gatherings of people outside your social bubble are limited to 10 people who must socially distance.
  • Outdoor seated gatherings are limited to 50 people who must socially distance.
  • Outdoor standing gatherings are limited to 100 people who must socially distance.

This is to protect public health, especially that of Elders and people with chronic diseases.

Communities are encouraged to consider alternatives, such as:

  • holding smaller events now; and
  • postponing the larger events until a later date.

If you're organizing an event, read the guidance about how to organize an event safely. You can also email us: covid19info@gov.yk.ca.

Types of cultural gatherings

These can include: sweat lodges, potlatches, ceremonies and other gatherings

Holding a small event

  • Consider having bag lunches rather than shared meals.
  • Ensure there are opportunities to wash or sanitize hands.
  • Practise social distancing.

Sweat lodge ceremony

The implications of sweat lodge ceremonies for viral transmission of COVID-19 are unknown. We ask that you proceed with caution.

Attending a funeral

  • Practise safe social distancing at a funeral.
  • If travelling from outside Yukon, British Columbia, Northwest Territories or Nunavut to a funeral in Yukon you’ll have to self-isolate for 14 days.
  • If travelling to a funeral outside Yukon, find out what the regulations to self-isolate are at your destination.

Death

There is currently no known risk associated with being in the same room at a funeral or visitation service with the body of someone who died of COVID-19.

The virus spreads primarily through droplets of bodily fluid produced when an infected person coughs or sneezes, similar to how a cold or flu spreads. This type of spread is not a concern after death.

If you have questions about funerals, email covid19info@gov.yk.ca. A member of our staff will phone you back to talk about your situation.

Read out guidelines for funerals and death care services during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The purpose of the Yukon Business Relief Program

The Yukon Business Relief Program (YBRP) helps Yukon businesses that are experiencing significantly reduced revenues due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The program provides funding to cover specific fixed costs to help businesses survive and be in a position to resume normal business activities when the threat to public health eases.

When is the program deadline?

The Yukon Business Relief Program was extended to July 31. This is so we can continue our partnership with CanNor’s Northern Business Relief Fund.

How to apply

A business applies through Yukon government for support from either or both programs. This coordination happens automatically provided the business, on its application form, has permitted information sharing between the 2 governments.

How are applications assessed?

For expenses during the May 23 – July 23 extension period, applications will be assessed for support under CanNor’s Northern Business Relief Fund. Expenses not eligible for CanNor support will be assessed for payment by the Yukon Business Relief Program. Applications for June and July must demonstrate revenue loss in each month for which support is being sought.

How to show eligibility

You need to show 1 month of 30 per cent revenue loss (March, April and May 2020).

Which businesses are eligible?

This program is open to Yukon businesses, including home-based businesses, that have faced a minimum of 30 per cent loss in gross revenue due to the COVID-19 pandemic. A Yukon Business means a business that meets 3 of the following criteria:

  • has an office with a physical address in Yukon;
  • is subject to the Yukon Income Tax Act;
  • is registered as per the Business Corporations Act or the Partnership and Business Name Act, where applicable; and/or
  • has a valid municipal business license, where applicable.

What if you owe money to the Government of Yukon?

A business that owes money to Government of Yukon is eligible for this support.

Who qualifies for 75 per cent or 100 per cent reimbursement of costs?

100 per cent

Certain businesses with high levels of public contact, such as restaurants and retail, as well as those ordered to close by the Chief Medical Officer of Health.

75 per cent

Other businesses qualify for this amount. Please contact the Department of Economic Development for the reimbursement specific to your business.

Which organizations are ineligible?

The following organizations are excluded from this program:

  • Government of Yukon and its corporations;
  • Government of Canada and its corporations;
  • Yukon First Nation governments and their corporations;
  • municipalities;
  • religious organizations; and
  • not-for-profits.

This program also excludes businesses that belong to any of the following industries as classified under the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS):

  • finance and insurance;
  • real estate;
  • utilities;
  • telecommunications; and
  • mines.

What if you recently started your business?

Your new business is eligible if it was in operation by March 1, 2020, and meets the criteria for being a Yukon business. If your business operated for less than 1 year, a month-to-month comparison can be used to show the 30 per cent revenue drop. For example, February to March 2020, March to April 2020, April to May 2020, May to June 2020, or June to July 2020.

Eligible costs

This program covers the following fixed costs essential to business continuity:

  • commercial rent or lease for physical business location;
  • water, sewage and waste disposal;
  • electricity and heating fuel;
  • telephone, cable, internet and satellite;
  • software, data services, and subscriptions;
  • business insurance; and
  • pest control.

Eligible costs for home-based businesses:

  • Mortgage interest or rent costs accepted by the Canada Revenue Agency as attributable to the operation of the home-based business.
  • Home-based businesses must provide proof of “business use-of-home expenses deductions” as accepted by the Canada Revenue Agency. For example, portion of rent, property insurance, utilities and interest on mortgages deducted under the business use-of-home expenses, from their 2018 tax filings.
  • New home-based businesses without 2018 tax filings may provide 2019 tax filing documentation as proof of eligibility.

Ineligible costs

  • Mortgage principle payments for home businesses
  • Vehicle or equipment lease payment
  • Any costs that have already been covered by insurance
  • Any expense not listed under eligible costs covered by the program
  • Bank fees
  • Business mortgage and interest
  • Taxes you paid on eligible expenses

Prepare your application

How to demonstrate 30 per cent loss in revenue

Documentation you'll need

Submit your income statements for the months in question. Include items such as those listed below.

Utilities and other bills

If you haven’t received certain bills, submit your bill from the previous month as an estimate.

Rent

We can accept your April and May invoices. You do not have to calculate rent for a period of days.

Quarterly billing period

If you pay bills on a quarterly basis, we'll use the best proxy you have available such as expenses for previous quarter(s) or annual averages. Contact the department for guidance specific to your business

Insurance payment an annual basis

We'll calculate your pro-rated amount as the yearly amount divided by 12 months. You'll be reimbursed for the monthly equivalent.

What if you're unable to show revenue loss with income statements?

You may be able to provide other documentation showing decreased business of at least 30 per cent. Accommodations and tourism businesses, for example, can demonstrate decreased business through the number of reservations. Contact the department for guidance specific to your business.

Home-based business

Home-based businesses must provide proof of “business use-of-home expenses deductions” as accepted by the Canada Revenue Agency. For example, a portion of rent, property insurance, utilities and interest on mortgages deducted under the business use of home expenses from their 2018 tax filings. New home-based businesses without 2018 tax filings may provide 2019 tax filing documentation as proof of eligibility.

Periods of time to compare to show revenue loss

March 22 – May 23

You need to show revenue drop in 1 of those months.

May 24 – July 23

You must show the revenue drop for each month you're claiming expenses. This change is to verify there's been a sustained drop in revenue.

2 ways to show revenue loss over time:

  • A decline in 1 month in 2020 compared to the same month in 2019
  • A single month’s decline, from the month previous, for March through July, 2020.

Seasonal businesses: fixed costs but no revenue March – May, 2020

Seasonal businesses can qualify if their number of bookings (for future business during their operating season) decreased by 30 per cent.

How to apply

A single application can cover all months. If you were approved for March – May costs, you'll need to show a continued drop in revenue in June and July when you submit costs for those months. You do not need to submit another application.

What if you do not know your vendor ID

Leave this section blank and we can complete it up for you.

Learn more and apply.

Applying to other COVID-19 funding programs

You can apply to the Yukon Business Relief Program and the Canadian Emergency Wage Subsidy. Talk to your accounting professional for information on tax implications specific to your business.

Other funding options

We're collecting applications for the Northern Business Relief Fund administered by the Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency (CanNor). This program also pays certain fixed expenses but has different eligibility criteria and benefits that may be a better fit for your business. To discuss other Government of Yukon and Government of Canada supports you may qualify for, contact the department for guidance specific to your business.

If you have questions, email ecdev@gov.yk.ca or phone 867-456-3803, toll free in Yukon 1-800-661-0408 extension 3803.

Residential renters and landlords

A new Ministerial Order supports tenants who:

  • may have to follow a COVID-19 health-protection measure after June 25, 2020; or
  • owe back rent due to COVID-19 loss of income from March 26 to June 25, 2020.

The order includes the following:

  • a landlord may not evict a tenant if they breach the tenancy agreement or the Residential Landlord and Tenant Act because they are subject to a health-protection measure;
  • a landlord may not enter a rental unit while the tenant or someone in their household is under a health-protection measure;
  • a tenant may end their tenancy early with 30 days' notice if they're unable to pay rent because of COVID-19 loss of income;
  • as of July 1, 2020, a tenant must pay rent as per the tenancy agreement, unless they're under a health-protection measure; and
  • a tenant must pay their rent arrears to their landlord by December 31, 2020.

Paying rent arrears

  • A tenant who accrues rent arrears because they're subject to a health-protection measure after June 25, 2020, has until December 31, 2020 to repay.
  • If a tenant who is not subject to a health-protection measure accrues rent arrears after June 25, 2020, the landlord may serve them with a notice to end tenancy.
  • A tenant who has accrued rent from March 26 to June 25, 2020 because they or a member of their household were under a health-protection measure or because of loss of income due to COVID-19, has until December 31, 2020 to repay.

What happens if a tenant or a member of their household has COVID-19?

If a tenant or a member of their household becomes subject to a health-protection measure, the tenant must immediately notify the landlord and provide the following information:

  • state that they're subject to a health-protection measure;
  • the date that they expect the health-protection measure to be lifted; and
  • any change to the above.

If a tenant is unable to pay rent on time because they are subject to a health-protection, they must immediately notify their landlord by providing them with following information:

  • the tenant is unable to pay rent because they are subject to a health-protection measure;
  • the measures that the tenant is taking to access other sources of income;
  • the date when the tenant expects to be able to pay the rent; and
  • any change to the above.

What is a health-protection measure?

A health-protection measure means any of the following as it relates to a tenant or a member of the tenant’s household and COVID-19:

  • a quarantine of the person;
  • a restriction on the movement of the person or class of people, to and from the rental unit ‒ a health officer imposes the measure under the Public Health and Safety Act;
  • a restriction of a person's movement if it's recommended by or is under the authority of the Chief Medical Officer of Health or the Chief Public Health Officer ‒ it does not include physical distancing; and
  • hospitalization of the person.

Can the landlord ask for proof?

A landlord may ask a tenant to provide evidence that is “reasonable.”

The landlord cannot ask a tenant to provide a certificate issued by a doctor or nurse practitioner. The purpose of this is to not overload the medical system.

If the landlord is not satisfied with the evidence, they can apply to the Residential Tenancies Office for a determination whether a term of the Ministerial Order applies.

What if the landlord doesn’t believe that the regulation should apply to the tenancy?

The landlord may apply to the Residential Tenancies Office for an exemption.

Entry by the landlord into a unit

If a tenant gives a landlord notice that they or a member of their household is under a health-protection measure, the landlord cannot enter the rental unit unless:

  • the landlord has an order from the Residential Tenancies Office;
  • the tenant appears to have abandoned the rental unit; or
  • there's an emergency and it's necessary for the landlord to enter the rental unit to protect life or property.

Late payment of rent after June 25, 2020

What the tenant must do if they're under a COVID-19 health-protection measure

The tenant must pay the unpaid rent as soon as they're able to, or by December 31, 2020 – whichever comes 1st.

The tenant may end the tenancy early by giving the landlord 30 days' notice.

Unless the tenant is under a health-protection measure, all rent that's due as of July 1, 2020, must be paid in full as per the residential tenancy agreement.

What about filing applications for dispute resolution?

If a landlord serves a tenant with a notice to end tenancy for cause and the tenant is subject to a health-protection measure within 4 days of receiving it then all the deadlines are suspended. This is until the until the tenant is no longer subject to a health-protection measure.

If a landlord serves a tenant with a notice to end tenancy without cause and the tenant is subject to a health-protection measure within 9 days of receiving the notice then all deadlines are suspended. This is until the tenant is no longer subject to a health-protection measure. Tenants may dispute evictions suspended in this way once they are no longer subject to a health-protection measure.

What happens if a tenant is under a health-protection measure when their tenancy ends?

A tenant who is subject to a health-protection measure at the same time as their tenancy is set to end, may stay in the rental unit until 4 days after they are no longer subject to a health-protection measure. They must pay rent on a prorated basis for the time that they are overholding.

What about serving documents?

If 1 party has the email address for another, they may serve documents by sending them to that email.

The documents will be considered served:

  • either the earliest date that the party confirms receipt by email; or
  • 5 days after it was sent.

How long will this order be in effect for?

It will be in effect until the COVID-19 state of emergency ends.

Get posters and materials to increase awareness and prevent the spread of COVID-19. 

How to prevent the spread of COVID-19

Follow the 6 steps to staying safe.

Also:

  • avoid close contact with people who are sick;
  • clean and disinfect objects and surfaces that are touched often;
  • cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze, then throw the tissue immediately into the trash; and
  • cover your mouth and nose with your inner elbow when you cough or sneeze.

How to reduce the risk of potential complications from COVID-19

Stay as healthy as possible now. For example, stop smoking or vaping and get the seasonal flu shot. You should also manage chronic illnesses such as diabetes with help from your doctor.

Remember you can still phone your doctor for your regular health needs or to discuss new concerns. Doctors offices and community health centre are open. 

Using bleach or alcohol as cleaners

Get information on cleaning and disinfecting your home or workplace.

Using a humidifier

The benefits of a humidifier may depend on your existing health condition. Ask your health care professional for advice.

Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses. Some cause illness in people and others cause illness in animals.

Human coronaviruses are common and are typically associated with mild illnesses similar to the common cold. Rarely, animal coronaviruses can infect people. More rarely, these can then spread from person to person through close contact. For more information about animal to human transmission.

COVID-19 is a new disease that has not been previously identified in humans. The World Health Organization declared the COVID-19 pandemic. The “19” in the name of the virus indicates the year the virus appeared.

COVID-19 is a type of coronavirus. Coronaviruses are most commonly spread from someone who’s infected through:

  • respiratory droplets generated when you cough or sneeze;
  • close, prolonged personal contact, such as touching or shaking hands; or
  • touching something with the virus on it, then touching your mouth, nose or eyes before washing your hands.

What is community spread?

Community spread is when we cannot trace how someone became infected. For example, a person does not have a history of travel or a connection to someone who is infected with COVID-19. Sometimes we talk about community transmission. This means the same as community spread.

How long does the virus lasts on surfaces?

We do not know for certain how long COVID-19 virus survives on surfaces. Early information suggests that the COVID-19 virus may last on surfaces for a few hours or several days depending on different conditions.

To protect yourself, use good hygiene measures and regularly clean and disinfect surfaces.

Food and COVID-19

There’s currently no evidence to suggest that food is a likely source or route of transmission of the virus. This includes meat from livestock or Yukon wildlife.

Keep yourself and your family safe when handing any food:

  • follow food safety practices;
  • cook food to safe temperatures;
  • avoid contamination of uncooked foods; and
  • avoid consuming raw or undercooked animal products.

Keep your employees safe from COVID-19

  • Enforce safe-spacing measures in the workplace.
  • Encourage and support employees to work from home, if possible.
  • Undertake routine environmental cleaning (download information on cleaning and disinfecting the workplace and cleaning and disinfecting your home).
  • Promote respiratory etiquette.
  • Promote regular hand-washing. Download 1 of our hand-washing signs to post as a reminder.
  • Encourage and support staff to stay home when they’re sick.
  • Support staff and clients returning to Yukon.

Review the guidelines for the delivery of critical, essential and other services in Yukon communities.

Other guidance

  • People who can work from home are asked to do so.
  • Employers are asked to look for ways to support employees to work from home, where possible.
  • Continue to practise good hand hygiene at your place of work.
  • Continue to keep your place of work clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces often.
  • Employees who’ve returned from travel outside of the territory have to self-isolate for 14 days and should not be working.

Read about essential services in Yukon during COVID-19.

Read about critical services in Yukon during COVID-19.

For more information check the Government of Canada’s Risk Informed Decision Making

Find information about supports for employees, businesses and resources on how to maintain a safe workplace.

Find information about supports available for Yukoners.

Keeping work camps stay safe

The Government of Yukon has guidelines for work camps operating during the COVID-19 pandemic

What you can do

  • Be sure to provide staff and camp residents access to the most up-to-date and accurate information about COVID-19.
  • Ensure all staff and camp residents are informed of the infection prevention and control measures being implemented in the camp to help reduce and minimize the risk of potential disease transmission in the camp.
  • Inform the staff and camp residents of procedures to follow should they become sick.
  • We advise that employees do not work when they are sick.
  • Employers should not require the worker to provide a doctor’s note for sick leave if they are sick or are required to self-isolate.

Remuneration for isolating employees

We recommend that employers provide remuneration to employees who are on isolation precautions. This should be provided throughout the duration of self isolation. This will help to ensure that people who are sick will:

  • report their symptoms; and
  • follow to isolation protocols.

Concern: a mine or employer near your community brings in employees from out of territory

Miners coming to work in the territory have to self-isolate for 14 days upon entering Yukon. Mines facilitate this in hotels in Whitehorse. The Office of the Chief Medical Officer of Health and the Department of Energy, Mines and Resources are working closely with the individual mines. Each mine must be evaluated to assess levels of risk and determine if operations can continue in a safe manner.

There's an increased risk for more severe outcomes in people:

  • 65 years or older;
  • who have compromised immune systems; or
  • who have underlying medical conditions.

What is the risk for infants?

Recent evidence suggests the risk to infants is low – very few children under 5 show serious illness from COVID-19, though they are not immune.

What are the risks for pregnant women?

We do not currently know if pregnant women have a greater chance of getting sick from COVID-19 than the general public nor whether they are more likely to have serious illness as a result.

Pregnant women experience changes in their bodies that may increase their risk of some infections. With viruses from the same family as COVID-19, and other viral respiratory infections, such as influenza, women have had a higher risk of developing severe illness. It is always important for pregnant women to protect themselves from illnesses.

What are the risks for people who use drugs or alcohol?

See the BC Centre for Centre for Disease Control’s website for more information about people who use drugs or alcohol and COVID-19.

Safe spacing 

When someone coughs or sneezes they spray small liquid droplets from their nose or mouth. These droplets may contain the virus. If you’re too close and the person has the COVID-19 virus, you may contract it.

Safe spacing means making changes in your everyday routines to minimize close contact with others.

  • avoid common greetings, such as handshakes and hugs;
  • limit contact with people at higher risk such as older adults and people in poor health; and
  • keep a distance of at least 2 metres (6 feet) from anyone who’s not in your household or your combined household.

Self-isolation

You must monitor yourself for symptoms if you’re self-isolating because you:

  • travelled outside Yukon, British Columbia, the Northwest Territories or Nunavut; or
  • had contact with someone infected with COVID-19

If you develop symptoms:

Phone 911 if you’re having a medical emergency.

Get more information about self-isolation.

The Chief Medical Officer of Health is telling all people who travelled outside of Yukon, British Columbia, Northwest Territories and Nunavut to self-isolate for 14 days when they arrive in Yukon. 

You'll need to:

  • monitor your health for fever, cough or difficulty breathing; and
  • follow healthy respiratory practices.

If you do develop symptoms within 14 days:

  • continue to isolate yourself from others;
  • phone a health care provider;
  • tell your health care provider about your symptoms and travel history; and
  • your health care provider will provide advice on what you should do.

In communities outside Whitehorse:

Phone your local health centre to arrange for testing.

In Whitehorse:

Phone 811 or your family physician. If your symptoms become severe and you need immediate medical care phone 911.

Border enforcement

Every person arriving at a Yukon border has to stop at a checkpoint. Find information about border enforcement.

Residents leaving Yukon

Choosing not to travel outside Yukon is the best way to protect yourself, your family, and our communities from the spread of COVID-19. If you have plans to travel, consider cancelling or postponing your trip.

Yukoners abroad

Yukon residents currently outside of Canada should find out what commercial options are available to return to home. They should consider returning as soon as possible.

Although it’s not advised, if you’re still considering travel outside of Canada, you should do the following:

  • check travel advisories before travelling;
  • know the health risks for your destination;
  • understand the risks to your safety and security abroad;
  • ensure you have sufficient finances and necessities, including medication, in case your travels are disrupted; and
  • be prepared if airlines revise scheduled flights to and from your destination.

If you travel abroad:

  • you’ll be subject to the measures of other countries;
  • your scheduled trip may become much longer;
  • you may have reduced access to quality health care; and
  • your travel health insurance will likely not provide coverage in a pandemic.

The Chief Medical Officer of Health would also like to reiterate that you should avoid all travel on cruise ships due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Find out about financial assistance for Yukoners abroad.

Travel within Yukon

The Chief Medical Officer of Health advises you be respectful of community members’ requests when entering a community or a business.

Find out more about travelling to communities.

Public gatherings of more than 50 people have been banned. Yukoners should not attend any social gatherings if they have:

  • any flu-like symptoms; or
  • an underlying health condition.

Concern: community members bringing the virus back into community

People who choose to travel outside of Yukon, British Columbia, Northwest Territories and Nunavut have to self-isolate for 14 days upon returning to Yukon. Outdoor gatherings of 50 people or more are banned in Yukon.

When travelling and at home, people need to be extra diligent with preventative practices:

  • wash your hands often;
  • use hand sanitizer if soap and water are not available; and
  • avoid touching your face.

Find more information about travel during COVID-19.

In May 2020, we invited the public to send in questions about the COVID-19 pandemic for Premier Sandy Silver and Yukon Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Brendan Hanley to answer at a Virtual Town Hall on May 29. There was not time for them to answer all the questions during the event so we've published the remaining questions and answers for you to read.  

Information for nominees

Job loss because of COVID-19: will your permanent residence application be affected

Lay-offs caused by COVID-19 will not affect either your Yukon Nominee Program status or impact your permanent residency application for the duration of the state of emergency. You do need to contact the Yukon Immigration Unit.

Laid-off: do you qualify for Employment Insurance?

The Government of Canada administers Employment Insurance benefits. Phone toll free 1-800-206-7218 to find out if you're eligible.

Laid-off: work permit is about to expire

Contact our office immediately. If your work permit or nomination is going to expire during the state of emergency, we'll issue you a support letter to extend your work permit so you can maintain legal status in Canada.

Information for employers

Your nominee signed a Tri-Partite Agreement: affecting on the 35 to 40 hours per week agreement

To give businesses more flexibility during the pandemic, the usual 35 ro 40 hour obligation for nominees has been waived. If you need to reduce hours for all staff and the nominee’s work hours are also affected, please keep track of this reduction of hours. If your nominee is laid-off, please notify our office.

Laying off staff: what to do about current nominees

Nominees who lose their employment during the state of emergency will remain in the program without penalty. After the state of emergency has ended they will be given 90 days to return to their previous employer or find a new employer.

Application in process to sponsor an overseas nominee: how to proceed

Applications will still be accepted as long as:

  • you have not laid off any Canadian citizens or permanent residents; and
  • your operations are continuing as usual.

Before your assessment we'll confirm that:

  • you're continuing to recruit domestically; and
  • you wish to proceed with the application.

Current territorial travel restrictions mean only essential and critical workers can enter Yukon by road or air. Monitor our website for updates to this information. Federal travel restrictions may affect a worker wanting to enter Canada.

Laying off a nominee: rehiring

If you lay off your nominee, you can rehire them. No new application will be required.

Application in process: putting it on hold

We can hold applications for employers waiting to determine how their operations will be affected by the state of emergency. To have your application put on hold, please phone or email us as soon as possible.

Nominee arriving in Yukon: employer responsibilities

Anyone entering Canada is required to self-isolate upon arrival. Employers cannot prevent workers from meeting these requirements.

During self-isolation, the employer:

  • has to pay the worker regular pay and benefits for the self-isolation period;
  • cannot make any payroll deductions related to self-isolation measures;
  • has to provide accommodation that meets all self-isolation requirements, including alternate accommodation (for example, hotel) if the requirements cannot otherwise be met; and
  • must monitor the worker’s health on a daily basis by phone or email, and report any symptoms to the appropriate authority.

The worker cannot be asked to perform any duties during the self-isolation period.

If the nominee has symptoms they must self-isolate in the 1st city they arrive in Canada. If they do not have symptoms (asymptomatic) they can travel to their final destination and self-isolate there.

Information for foreign nationals

Applying to the Yukon Nominee Program: lost your job, or cannot find a job

To be eligible for the Yukon Nominee Program, you will need a job offer from an employer. Then, the employer will apply to the program to hire you.

On a study permit: can you work full time?

Restrictions on employment are handled by the Government of Canada. Find more information about working in Canada if you're on a study permit.

More information

How the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is affecting immigration, refugees, citizenship and passport services.

Frequently asked questions: Changes to the Temporary Foreign Worker program regarding COVID-19

For questions about this or other immigration issues email yukon.nominee@gov.yk.ca, or phone 867-667-5131, toll free in Yukon 1-800-661-0407 extension 5131.

If you have signs of a respiratory infection, you’ll be asked to wear a mask in a health facility, such as a:

  • hospital;
  • health centre; or
  • continuing care home.

Homemade or cloth masks

Wearing a homemade or cloth mask is not a substitute for safe spacing. If you’re wearing a mask, you must still keep 2 metres (6 feet) away from people who are not in your household bubble.

Wearing a mask at Yukon airports

You have to wear a non-medical mask in Yukon airport terminals and buildings. 

Where we recommend you wear a non-medical mask

The Chief Medical Officer of Health recommends that people wear non-medical masks in certain situations

Medical masks

Supplies of medical masks must continue to be given to health care workers so they can wear them;

  • during medical procedures; and
  • when they care for people who are infected.

Find out more about non-medical masks.