Flag protocol

  • ​Flying flags at half-mast
  • Flag placement
  • ​Disposal of flags

  1. ​Flying flags at half-mast

    Flying flags at half-mast is a sign of respect and mourning for an individual or to mark a special day. The position of half-mast generally means the position of the flag is exactly half-way down the flag pole.

    The Government of Canada determines the occasions when the Canadian flag is flown at half-mast. Apart from these occasions dictated by national protocol, the Premier of Yukon approves when Yukon flags fly at half-mast.

     

    Days the flags fly at half-mast

    • April 9: National Day of Remembrance of the Battle of Vimy Ridge;
    • April 28: National Day of Mourning for Persons Killed or Injured in the Workplace;
    • June 23: National Day of Remembrance for Victims of Terrorism;
    • Last Sunday in September: Canadian Police and Peace Officers Memorial;
    • November 11: Remembrance Day; and
    • December 6: National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence Against Women.

     

    Occasions for half-masting flags at Government of Yukon buildings

    Flags will be flown at half-mast at Government of Yukon buildings after the passing of people who hold the following positions:

    • Commissioner of Yukon (current and former);
    • Premier of Yukon (current and former);
    • Speaker of the Yukon Legislative Assembly (current);
    • member of the Yukon Executive Council (current);
    • member of the Yukon Legislative Assembly (current);
    • Yukon Supreme Court Chief Justice (current); and
    • Yukon Member of Parliament (current).

     

    Flags will be flown at half-mast outside the Yukon Legislative Assembly after the passing of people who hold the following positions:

    • Yukon Member of Parliament (former);
    • Yukon Senator (current and former);
    • Yukon First Nations Chiefs and Grand Chief (current);
    • member of the Yukon Executive Council (former);
    • member of the Yukon Legislative Assembly (former);
    • member of the Privy Council from Yukon; and
    • mayor of Whitehorse (current).

     

    At the passing of any current Yukon community mayors (excluding Whitehorse) flags will be flown at half-mast at Government of Yukon buildings in their home community.

     

    Union Jack flag

    On December 11 the Union Jack flag is flown at Government of Yukon buildings to commemorate the anniversary of the proclamation of the Statute of Westminster.


  2. Flag placement

    When the territorial flag is flown with other flags, the order of precedence is:

    1. the Canadian flag;
    2. the flags of other sovereign nations in alphabetical order;
    3. the flags of the provinces of Canada (in the order in which they joined Confederation);
    4. the flags of the territories of Canada (in the order in which they joined Confederation);
    5. the flags of Yukon First Nation governments in alphabetical order;
    6. the flags of municipalities/cities in alphabetical order;
    7. banners of organizations in alphabetical order; and
    8. historical flags.

     

    Flag placement is determined from the point of view of the observer facing the flag poles viewing left to right.

    When flying two flags

    When flying the Canadian flag and the Yukon flag, the Canadian flag takes the position of honour on the left to an observer facing the flags.

    When the Yukon flag is displayed with another provincial or territorial flag, the Yukon flag holds the position of honour on the left.

    When flying three flags

    When three flags are displayed, the position of honour is moved to the center. The other two flags should, in alphabetical order, be placed to the left and right of the Canadian flag.

    When flying four or more flags

    When more than three flags are flown, the position of honour is on the left, followed by other flags in order of precedence.


  3. ​Disposal of flags

    When a flag becomes tattered and is no longer in a suitable condition for use, it should be destroyed in a dignified way.

    A flag is considered to be tattered or worn when its colour has faded, it has holes, or the outermost seam of the flag has become frayed.

    Flags can be disposed of in one of the following ways:

    • Return the flag to the Government of Yukon Chief of Protocol office in person at the Executive Council Office, 2071 Second Avenue, Whitehorse, Yukon, or by mail: Government of Yukon Chief of Protocol, PO Box 2703, A-8, Whitehorse YT Y1A 2C6.
    • Flags made of natural fibres (wool, cotton, linen) should be burned in a dignified manner: privately without ceremony or public attention being drawn to the destruction of the material.
    • Flags made of synthetic material (nylon or polyester) should be torn into strips, with each element of the flag reduced to a single colour, so that the remaining pieces do not resemble a flag. The individual pieces should then be placed in a bag for disposal. The shreds of fabric cannot be re-used or fashioned into anything.

Contact 

Questions about flag protocol can be sent to the Chief of Protocol by email at protocol@gov.yk.ca or by calling 867-393-6281.