Information current

August 7, 2020

We're in Phase 3 of lifting COVID-19 restrictions. Watch the latest video update.

For non-medical questions, email covid19info@gov.yk.ca or phone 1-877-374-0425.

For medical questions or if you feel ill, phone 811, or launch the COVID-19 self-assessment tool.

Information for people entering Yukon

If you have questions about borders and enforcement, phone toll free 1-877-374-0425 or email covid19enforcement@gov.yk.ca.

If you're coming to Yukon

As of 1 July 2020, anyone may enter Yukon. However, those who are not residents of BC, NWT or Nunavut, or have travelled outside of those jurisdictions in the 14 days prior to entering Yukon are required to self-isolate in Whitehorse for 14 days.

What else you need to know 

Find out more about entering Yukon and border restrictions during the pandemic.

Find out if you have to self-isolate

Who does not need to self-isolate 

You do not need to self-isolate when you get to Yukon if you're a resident of:

  • Yukon;
  • British Columbia;
  • the Northwest Territories; or
  • Nunavut.

If you're a resident of 1 of these 4 regions and you travelled outside of these 4 regions in the last 14 days you have to self-isolate.

You also do not need to self-isolate if you're a critical worker

Who needs to self-isolate

If you're a resident coming from anywhere else in Canada you must self-isolate for 14 days when you arrive in Yukon. This is the law in Yukon.

When you self-isolate, you have to monitor yourself for symptoms of COVID-19.

What if you tested negative for COVID-19 before arriving in Yukon?

Even if you tested negative for a COVID-19 before or upon arriving in Yukon, you still have to self-isolate for 14 days when you arrive in Yukon.

Why is self-isolation 14 days long?

You have to isolate for 14 days because this is how long it takes most people to become sick after they’ve been infected with COVID-19. During most of the time between exposure and infection, people will test negative. This negative result does not mean that people will not become sick.

Hours for Yukon-British Columbia border enforcement

Travellers entering Yukon from British Columbia have to stop at the Watson Lake weigh station or the Yukon-British Columbia border at Junction 37. Enforcement officers are on duty at both locations 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

If you get sick while travelling or working in Yukon

If you feel unwell or have any symptoms of COVID-19 while you're in Yukon, phone 811 immediately and speak with a health professional to find out if you need testing.

If you have symptoms and need immediate medical attention, call 911 and tell them you may have COVID-19.

If you need to be tested

  1. If you need a test for COVID-19, you must phone ahead and then go to the closest emergency room or health centre.
  2. Greeters will meet you at the door to screen and admit you. You must follow the instructions you're given to avoid possibly transmitting the virus to other patients and staff.
  3. While you're waiting for your test results you'll be required to go into self-isolation.

Help with self-isolation

Phone the Emergency Support Services team 867-332-4587. They'll work with you on a safe self-isolation plan.

Be aware that any costs to do with self-isolation, including food, accommodation or for having to extend your stay in Yukon will be your responsibility.

Where can you self-isolate?

In Yukon, self-isolation is only permitted in Whitehorse. Phone the Emergency Support Services team 867-332-4587. They'll work with you to assess the situation and determine the safest self-isolation plan and if required, transportation requirements for getting to Whitehorse.

Any costs associated with self-isolation will be your responsibility. This includes:

  • food;
  • accommodation; or
  • having to extend your stay in Yukon.

We recommend that you keep a journal or detailed record of when and where you visited during your time in Yukon in the event that contract tracing is required. If you do experience symptoms, contact tracing will help us limit the spread. Please have your health care card with you during your trip.

Yukon residents travelling home to Yukon

If you're arriving from a region outside of British Columbia, Northwest Territories or Nunavut:

  • You must self-isolate for 14 days immediately upon arriving at your home or other safe location.
  • Do not make unnecessary stops along the way.
  • Arrange for a friend or neighbor to drop groceries and other supplies at your door.
  • Monitor yourself for symptoms.

If you develop symptoms, phone 811 or your local health provider to see if you require testing.

Questions or need support with self-isolation?

If you do not have a place where you can safely self-isolate or if you require support while self-isolating such as:

  • picking up medication or groceries; or
  • needing mental wellness of substance use care:
    • email covid19info@gov.yk.ca; or
    • phone
      • Emergency Support Services at 867-332-4587. Monday to Friday from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. 
      • COVID-19 InfoLine toll-free at 1-877-374-0425 between 7:30 a.m. and 8 p.m. every day.

If you need assistance outside the times noted, the Emergency Support Services team’s voicemail has additional directions.

Find out how to safely self-isolate.

 

Non-Yukon resident travelling through Yukon to reach Alaska, NWT or elsewhere
  • You must transit through Yukon within 24 hours.

  • Avoid stopping in rural communities.
  • Do not stop for non-essential reasons. If you must get gas, pay at the pump. If you must stay overnight at a hotel, self-isolate in your room.
  • If you develop COVID-19 symptoms during your transit, stop and phone 811.

Travel to or from Alaska

The border between the United States and Canada is closed to all non-essential travel. Americans can travel into Canada if they’re travelling:

  • to Alaska; or
  • from Alaska to the rest of the United States.

Americans travelling through Yukon have to follow a designated travel corridor. We give travellers a map of this route at Yukon borders. The State of Alaska introduced travel guidance. Read Alaska’s health guidance for travellers during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Download route maps for your travel through Yukon

These maps show mandated travel routes.

Critical or essential worker entering or returning to Yukon for work

Essential service providers who enter the territory must self-isolate for 14 days if they do not live in British Columbia, Northwest Territories or Nunavut. 

Critical service providers who need to travel in or out of Yukon or the Yukon-BC border area (as defined in the Civil Emergency Measures Health Protection Order) must follow self-isolation requirements as much as possible, including the guidelines for the delivery of critical services during COVID-19.

Critical and essential service providers must also follow the delivery of services guidelines when travelling to communities.

Find the latest updates on COVID-19 in Yukon.

Masks in Yukon

Where you have to wear a non-medical mask

It's mandatory to wear a non-medical mask in Yukon airport buildings and terminals.

Wearing a mask

It is not mandatory for people to wear masks in Yukon aside from in airport buildings and terminals. 

A personal service establishment, such as a hairdresser, may ask you to wear a mask. 

If you're sick

Wear a mask, self-isolate and seek medical advice or phone 811. 

What are the current orders and directions?

Orders given by the Minister of Community Services and the Chief Medical Officer of Health are enforceable under the Civil Emergency Measures Act and the Public Health and Safety Act. Anyone who fails to obey an order may be subject to a fine up to $500 per day, up to 6 months in prison, or both. Charges under the Public Health and Safety Act (PHSA) may include fines of up to $5,000 per day.

Directions are guidance and advice to limit the spread of COVID-19. Although they are no enforceable, they should be followed.

Read Orders and directions

 

As of 1 July 2020, anyone may enter Yukon. However, those who are not residents of BC, NWT or Nunavut, or have travelled outside of those jurisdictions in the 14 days prior to entering Yukon are required to self-isolate in Whitehorse for 14 days.

What else you need to know 

Find out more about entering Yukon and border restrictions during the pandemic.

Who does not need to self-isolate 

You do not need to self-isolate when you get to Yukon if you're a resident of:

  • Yukon;
  • British Columbia;
  • the Northwest Territories; or
  • Nunavut.

If you're a resident of 1 of these 4 regions and you travelled outside of these 4 regions in the last 14 days you have to self-isolate.

You also do not need to self-isolate if you're a critical worker

Who needs to self-isolate

If you're a resident coming from anywhere else in Canada you must self-isolate for 14 days when you arrive in Yukon. This is the law in Yukon.

When you self-isolate, you have to monitor yourself for symptoms of COVID-19.

What if you tested negative for COVID-19 before arriving in Yukon?

Even if you tested negative for a COVID-19 before or upon arriving in Yukon, you still have to self-isolate for 14 days when you arrive in Yukon.

Why is self-isolation 14 days long?

You have to isolate for 14 days because this is how long it takes most people to become sick after they’ve been infected with COVID-19. During most of the time between exposure and infection, people will test negative. This negative result does not mean that people will not become sick.

Travellers entering Yukon from British Columbia have to stop at the Watson Lake weigh station or the Yukon-British Columbia border at Junction 37. Enforcement officers are on duty at both locations 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

If you feel unwell or have any symptoms of COVID-19 while you're in Yukon, phone 811 immediately and speak with a health professional to find out if you need testing.

If you have symptoms and need immediate medical attention, call 911 and tell them you may have COVID-19.

If you need to be tested

  1. If you need a test for COVID-19, you must phone ahead and then go to the closest emergency room or health centre.
  2. Greeters will meet you at the door to screen and admit you. You must follow the instructions you're given to avoid possibly transmitting the virus to other patients and staff.
  3. While you're waiting for your test results you'll be required to go into self-isolation.

Help with self-isolation

Phone the Emergency Support Services team 867-332-4587. They'll work with you on a safe self-isolation plan.

Be aware that any costs to do with self-isolation, including food, accommodation or for having to extend your stay in Yukon will be your responsibility.

Where can you self-isolate?

In Yukon, self-isolation is only permitted in Whitehorse. Phone the Emergency Support Services team 867-332-4587. They'll work with you to assess the situation and determine the safest self-isolation plan and if required, transportation requirements for getting to Whitehorse.

Any costs associated with self-isolation will be your responsibility. This includes:

  • food;
  • accommodation; or
  • having to extend your stay in Yukon.

We recommend that you keep a journal or detailed record of when and where you visited during your time in Yukon in the event that contract tracing is required. If you do experience symptoms, contact tracing will help us limit the spread. Please have your health care card with you during your trip.

If you're arriving from a region outside of British Columbia, Northwest Territories or Nunavut:

  • You must self-isolate for 14 days immediately upon arriving at your home or other safe location.
  • Do not make unnecessary stops along the way.
  • Arrange for a friend or neighbor to drop groceries and other supplies at your door.
  • Monitor yourself for symptoms.

If you develop symptoms, phone 811 or your local health provider to see if you require testing.

Questions or need support with self-isolation?

If you do not have a place where you can safely self-isolate or if you require support while self-isolating such as:

  • picking up medication or groceries; or
  • needing mental wellness of substance use care:
    • email covid19info@gov.yk.ca; or
    • phone
      • Emergency Support Services at 867-332-4587. Monday to Friday from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. 
      • COVID-19 InfoLine toll-free at 1-877-374-0425 between 7:30 a.m. and 8 p.m. every day.

If you need assistance outside the times noted, the Emergency Support Services team’s voicemail has additional directions.

Find out how to safely self-isolate.

 

  • You must transit through Yukon within 24 hours.

  • Avoid stopping in rural communities.
  • Do not stop for non-essential reasons. If you must get gas, pay at the pump. If you must stay overnight at a hotel, self-isolate in your room.
  • If you develop COVID-19 symptoms during your transit, stop and phone 811.

Travel to or from Alaska

The border between the United States and Canada is closed to all non-essential travel. Americans can travel into Canada if they’re travelling:

  • to Alaska; or
  • from Alaska to the rest of the United States.

Americans travelling through Yukon have to follow a designated travel corridor. We give travellers a map of this route at Yukon borders. The State of Alaska introduced travel guidance. Read Alaska’s health guidance for travellers during the COVID-19 pandemic.

These maps show mandated travel routes.

Essential service providers who enter the territory must self-isolate for 14 days if they do not live in British Columbia, Northwest Territories or Nunavut. 

Critical service providers who need to travel in or out of Yukon or the Yukon-BC border area (as defined in the Civil Emergency Measures Health Protection Order) must follow self-isolation requirements as much as possible, including the guidelines for the delivery of critical services during COVID-19.

Critical and essential service providers must also follow the delivery of services guidelines when travelling to communities.

Find the latest updates on COVID-19 in Yukon.

Where you have to wear a non-medical mask

It's mandatory to wear a non-medical mask in Yukon airport buildings and terminals.

Wearing a mask

It is not mandatory for people to wear masks in Yukon aside from in airport buildings and terminals. 

A personal service establishment, such as a hairdresser, may ask you to wear a mask. 

If you're sick

Wear a mask, self-isolate and seek medical advice or phone 811. 

Orders given by the Minister of Community Services and the Chief Medical Officer of Health are enforceable under the Civil Emergency Measures Act and the Public Health and Safety Act. Anyone who fails to obey an order may be subject to a fine up to $500 per day, up to 6 months in prison, or both. Charges under the Public Health and Safety Act (PHSA) may include fines of up to $5,000 per day.

Directions are guidance and advice to limit the spread of COVID-19. Although they are no enforceable, they should be followed.

Read Orders and directions