Information current

May 14, 2021

Keep yourself and others safe: practise the Safe 6 and wear a mask. For medical questions or if you feel ill phone 811 or launch the COVID-19 self-assessment tool.

Information for people entering Yukon

If you have questions about borders and enforcement, phone toll free 1-877-374-0425 or email covid19enforcement@yukon.ca.

If you're coming to Yukon

If you're arriving in Yukon

Anyone may enter Yukon but everyone must self-isolate for 14 days upon arrival in the territory. This is the law in Yukon. Learn more about self-isolation and get help to self-isolate.

There are exceptions. You do not need to self-isolate if you're a resident of the Yukon-BC border areas of Atlin Lower Post, Fire Side, Jade City, Fraser and Pleasant Camp and you have not travelled outside of the BC border areas or Yukon in the last 14 days.

You do not need to fully self-isolate if you're a critical service worker who has:

  • only left Yukon to perform your duties; or 
  • travelled to Yukon as part of your job.

As a critical worker, you may go to work, but during the 14 days after you arrive in Yukon, you must self-isolate when you are not performing your duties.

If you're arriving in Yukon from outside of Canada

You can travel to your destination in Yukon, but you must follow additional federal rules for quarantine prior to arrival. This includes a mandatory 3 night pre-paid booking at a government-authorized hotel at your own cost when you arrive in Canada. Your mandatory 14-day Yukon self-isolation begins when you arrive in the territory.

Federal quarantine rules are different from Yukon self-isolation rules. Find out what the federal quarantine laws are. 

Where to self-isolate

You must self-isolate for 14 days in Whitehorse unless you’re:

  • staying with a family member who is a Yukon resident and they live outside the city; or
  • a Yukon resident who does not live in Whitehorse.

When you self-isolate or quarantine, you have to monitor yourself for symptoms of COVID-19.

What if you tested negative for COVID-19 before arriving in Yukon?

Even if you tested negative for a COVID-19 before or upon arriving in Yukon, you still have to self-isolate for 14 days when you arrive in Yukon.

Why is self-isolation 14 days long?

You have to isolate for 14 days because this is how long it takes most people to become sick after they’ve been infected with COVID-19. During most of the time between exposure and infection, people will test negative. This negative result does not mean that people will not become sick.

Learn more about self-isolation. 

Land border enforcement

Travellers entering Yukon from British Columbia have to stop at the Watson Lake weigh station or the Yukon-British Columbia border at Junction 37. Enforcement officers are on duty at both locations from 6 a.m. to 12 a.m. 7 days a week.

  • Travellers arriving outside of these hours will be required to stop at an on-site kiosk.
  • They must sign a declaration and submit their self-isolation plan, along with a contact number.
  • Completing the self-declaration is required by law.

The Canada Border Services Agency controls all land borders into Yukon from Alaska. We are working closely and collaboratively with CBSA.

There are signs directing those travelling along the Dempster Highway to contact us if they're entering from outside of Yukon.

If you get sick while travelling or working in Yukon

If you feel unwell or have any symptoms of COVID-19 while you're in Yukon:

  1. Self-isolate, and then:
  2. Follow the advice you're given.

Find out how to self-isolate.

Find out how to arrange for testing.

Help with self-isolation

The Self-Isolation Facility Assistance (SIFA) team works primarily to review and approve requests to self-isolate at the facility in Whitehorse. The facility is for emergency use only. The SIFA team can also work with you to develop a safe self-isolation plan. 

Phone: 867-332-4587.

The SIFA team answers this phone Monday through Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. The team does not answer this phone on holidays or weekends.

Outside of these hours, you can leave messages on the SIFA phone. These will be returned  on the following business day.

Be aware that any costs to do with self-isolation, including food, accommodation or for having to extend your stay in Yukon will be your responsibility.

Where can you self-isolate?

Yukon residents

For Yukon residents and their relatives, self-isolation can take place in all communities. After arriving in Whitehorse, they're allowed to travel to their home community to safely self-isolate:

  • at home; or
  • another facility that's capable of meeting the requirements.

Non-Yukon residents

Anyone that is not a Yukon resident, and who is required to self-isolate, must do so in Whitehorse. There are limited exceptions included in the Civil Emergency Measures Health Protection (COVID-19) Order.

You are responsible for covering the cost of your self-isolation accommodation, with limited exceptions. You cannot self-isolate at a Government of Yukon campground, but you can self-isolate in a hotel or similar accommodation. Email us and we can help you to figure out your self-isolation plan: covid19info@yukon.ca.

We recommend that you keep a journal or detailed record of when and where you visited during your time in Yukon. This will help in the event that contract tracing is required. If you do experience symptoms, contact tracing will help us limit the spread. Please have your health care card with you during your trip.

Do you have questions or need support with self-isolation?

If you do not have a place where you can safely self-isolate or if you require support while self-isolating such as:

  • picking up medication or groceries; or
  • needing mental wellness of substance use care:
    • email covid19info@yukon.ca; or
    • phone the Self-Isolation Facility Assistance (SIFA) team at 867-332-4587.

The SIFA team answers their phone Monday through Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. The team does not answer this phone on holidays or weekends.

Outside of these hours, you can leave messages on the SIFA phone. These will be returned  on the following business day.

You can also call the COVID-19 InfoLine toll-free at 1-877-374-0425 between 7:30 a.m. and 8 p.m. every day.

Find out how to safely self-isolate.

Non-Yukon resident travelling through Yukon to reach Alaska, NWT or elsewhere
  • You must transit through Yukon within 24 hours.

  • Avoid stopping in rural communities.
  • Do not stop for non-essential reasons. If you must get gas, pay at the pump. If you must stay overnight at a hotel, self-isolate in your room.
  • If you develop COVID-19 symptoms during your transit, stop and phone 811.

Travel to or from Alaska

The border between the United States and Canada is closed to all non-essential travel. Americans can travel into Canada if they’re travelling:

  • to Alaska; or
  • from Alaska to the rest of the United States.

Americans travelling through Yukon have to follow a designated travel corridor. We give travellers a map of this route at Yukon borders. The State of Alaska introduced travel guidance. Read Alaska’s health guidance for travellers during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Download route maps for your travel through Yukon

These maps show mandated travel routes.

Critical or essential worker entering or returning to Yukon for work

Essential service providers who enter the territory must self-isolate for 14 days. 

Critical service providers who need to travel in or out of Yukon or the Yukon-BC border area (as defined in the Civil Emergency Measures Health Protection Order) that are travelling to perform their work duties, must follow self-isolation requirements as much as possible. This includes the guidelines for the delivery of critical services during COVID-19.

Critical and essential service providers must also follow the delivery of services guidelines when travelling to communities.

Find the latest updates on COVID-19 in Yukon.

Masks in Yukon

Where you have to wear a non-medical mask

By law, you have to wear a non-medical mask in all public indoor spaces in Yukon.

What are the current orders and directions?

Orders given by the Minister of Community Services and the Chief Medical Officer of Health are enforceable under the Civil Emergency Measures Act and the Public Health and Safety Act. Anyone who fails to obey an order may be subject to a fine up to $500 per day, up to 6 months in prison, or both. Charges under the Public Health and Safety Act (PHSA) may include fines of up to $5,000 per day.

Directions are guidance and advice to limit the spread of COVID-19. Although they are not enforceable, they should be followed.

Read Orders and directions

 

If you're arriving in Yukon

Anyone may enter Yukon but everyone must self-isolate for 14 days upon arrival in the territory. This is the law in Yukon. Learn more about self-isolation and get help to self-isolate.

There are exceptions. You do not need to self-isolate if you're a resident of the Yukon-BC border areas of Atlin Lower Post, Fire Side, Jade City, Fraser and Pleasant Camp and you have not travelled outside of the BC border areas or Yukon in the last 14 days.

You do not need to fully self-isolate if you're a critical service worker who has:

  • only left Yukon to perform your duties; or 
  • travelled to Yukon as part of your job.

As a critical worker, you may go to work, but during the 14 days after you arrive in Yukon, you must self-isolate when you are not performing your duties.

If you're arriving in Yukon from outside of Canada

You can travel to your destination in Yukon, but you must follow additional federal rules for quarantine prior to arrival. This includes a mandatory 3 night pre-paid booking at a government-authorized hotel at your own cost when you arrive in Canada. Your mandatory 14-day Yukon self-isolation begins when you arrive in the territory.

Federal quarantine rules are different from Yukon self-isolation rules. Find out what the federal quarantine laws are. 

Where to self-isolate

You must self-isolate for 14 days in Whitehorse unless you’re:

  • staying with a family member who is a Yukon resident and they live outside the city; or
  • a Yukon resident who does not live in Whitehorse.

When you self-isolate or quarantine, you have to monitor yourself for symptoms of COVID-19.

What if you tested negative for COVID-19 before arriving in Yukon?

Even if you tested negative for a COVID-19 before or upon arriving in Yukon, you still have to self-isolate for 14 days when you arrive in Yukon.

Why is self-isolation 14 days long?

You have to isolate for 14 days because this is how long it takes most people to become sick after they’ve been infected with COVID-19. During most of the time between exposure and infection, people will test negative. This negative result does not mean that people will not become sick.

Learn more about self-isolation. 

Travellers entering Yukon from British Columbia have to stop at the Watson Lake weigh station or the Yukon-British Columbia border at Junction 37. Enforcement officers are on duty at both locations from 6 a.m. to 12 a.m. 7 days a week.

  • Travellers arriving outside of these hours will be required to stop at an on-site kiosk.
  • They must sign a declaration and submit their self-isolation plan, along with a contact number.
  • Completing the self-declaration is required by law.

The Canada Border Services Agency controls all land borders into Yukon from Alaska. We are working closely and collaboratively with CBSA.

There are signs directing those travelling along the Dempster Highway to contact us if they're entering from outside of Yukon.

If you feel unwell or have any symptoms of COVID-19 while you're in Yukon:

  1. Self-isolate, and then:
  2. Follow the advice you're given.

Find out how to self-isolate.

Find out how to arrange for testing.

Help with self-isolation

The Self-Isolation Facility Assistance (SIFA) team works primarily to review and approve requests to self-isolate at the facility in Whitehorse. The facility is for emergency use only. The SIFA team can also work with you to develop a safe self-isolation plan. 

Phone: 867-332-4587.

The SIFA team answers this phone Monday through Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. The team does not answer this phone on holidays or weekends.

Outside of these hours, you can leave messages on the SIFA phone. These will be returned  on the following business day.

Be aware that any costs to do with self-isolation, including food, accommodation or for having to extend your stay in Yukon will be your responsibility.

Where can you self-isolate?

Yukon residents

For Yukon residents and their relatives, self-isolation can take place in all communities. After arriving in Whitehorse, they're allowed to travel to their home community to safely self-isolate:

  • at home; or
  • another facility that's capable of meeting the requirements.

Non-Yukon residents

Anyone that is not a Yukon resident, and who is required to self-isolate, must do so in Whitehorse. There are limited exceptions included in the Civil Emergency Measures Health Protection (COVID-19) Order.

You are responsible for covering the cost of your self-isolation accommodation, with limited exceptions. You cannot self-isolate at a Government of Yukon campground, but you can self-isolate in a hotel or similar accommodation. Email us and we can help you to figure out your self-isolation plan: covid19info@yukon.ca.

We recommend that you keep a journal or detailed record of when and where you visited during your time in Yukon. This will help in the event that contract tracing is required. If you do experience symptoms, contact tracing will help us limit the spread. Please have your health care card with you during your trip.

If you do not have a place where you can safely self-isolate or if you require support while self-isolating such as:

  • picking up medication or groceries; or
  • needing mental wellness of substance use care:
    • email covid19info@yukon.ca; or
    • phone the Self-Isolation Facility Assistance (SIFA) team at 867-332-4587.

The SIFA team answers their phone Monday through Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. The team does not answer this phone on holidays or weekends.

Outside of these hours, you can leave messages on the SIFA phone. These will be returned  on the following business day.

You can also call the COVID-19 InfoLine toll-free at 1-877-374-0425 between 7:30 a.m. and 8 p.m. every day.

Find out how to safely self-isolate.

  • You must transit through Yukon within 24 hours.

  • Avoid stopping in rural communities.
  • Do not stop for non-essential reasons. If you must get gas, pay at the pump. If you must stay overnight at a hotel, self-isolate in your room.
  • If you develop COVID-19 symptoms during your transit, stop and phone 811.

Travel to or from Alaska

The border between the United States and Canada is closed to all non-essential travel. Americans can travel into Canada if they’re travelling:

  • to Alaska; or
  • from Alaska to the rest of the United States.

Americans travelling through Yukon have to follow a designated travel corridor. We give travellers a map of this route at Yukon borders. The State of Alaska introduced travel guidance. Read Alaska’s health guidance for travellers during the COVID-19 pandemic.

These maps show mandated travel routes.

Essential service providers who enter the territory must self-isolate for 14 days. 

Critical service providers who need to travel in or out of Yukon or the Yukon-BC border area (as defined in the Civil Emergency Measures Health Protection Order) that are travelling to perform their work duties, must follow self-isolation requirements as much as possible. This includes the guidelines for the delivery of critical services during COVID-19.

Critical and essential service providers must also follow the delivery of services guidelines when travelling to communities.

Find the latest updates on COVID-19 in Yukon.

Where you have to wear a non-medical mask

By law, you have to wear a non-medical mask in all public indoor spaces in Yukon.

Orders given by the Minister of Community Services and the Chief Medical Officer of Health are enforceable under the Civil Emergency Measures Act and the Public Health and Safety Act. Anyone who fails to obey an order may be subject to a fine up to $500 per day, up to 6 months in prison, or both. Charges under the Public Health and Safety Act (PHSA) may include fines of up to $5,000 per day.

Directions are guidance and advice to limit the spread of COVID-19. Although they are not enforceable, they should be followed.

Read Orders and directions