Book an American Sign Language interpreter

Using a sign language interpreter allows for clear communication between you and your Deaf clients and makes services for Deaf people more accessible.

How do I book an ASL interpreter?

You can book an ASL interpreter by calling or texting 867-332-4275 or by email at interpreter.ASL@gov.yk.ca. Include details of your interpreting request such as time, date and location.

Book extra interpreters for longer assignments

Let us know if you need to book extra interpreters for longer assignments. Assignments that are more complex or longer than 2 hours may need a second ASL interpreter. We will provide the first interpreter, if available, at no cost to you. It is up to you to request a second interpreter at your expense. We can assist with securing a second qualified interpreter.

Who can book an ASL interpreter?

Health and other service providers

Book the interpreter when a member of the Deaf community requests this accommodation. Using a qualified medical sign language interpreter reduces misunderstandings about diagnosis and treatment and can also reduce the need for repeat visits.

Businesses and organizations that provide services to the public

Having an ASL interpreter available provides opportunity to equal access. This allows users to enjoy services and programs with the same quality and timelines that others receive.

Employers

Employers can book an interpreter for their Deaf employee so they can take part more in workplace activities such as staff meetings, assessments, evaluations and training. Communication is vital to an individual's growth and enjoyment in the workplace and having access to an ASL interpreter increases their quality of work and relationships.

What can I book an ASL interpreter for?

ASL – English interpreting is available for a variety of settings.

  • Medical. This could include appointments, hospital visits and emergencies.
  • Legal. This could include court and meetings with lawyers.
  • Government services. This could include housing and education.
  • Employment and training. This could include interviews, workplace meetings, workshops, and conferences.
  • Community and cultural events.
  • Arts and entertainment.
  • Recreation and sporting events.
  • Other individual needs.

Use video relay service to communicate

Video relay service, or VRS, is a service that enables people with hearing or speech disabilities to have phone conversations. It brings Deaf or Hard of Hearing people closer together with employers, friends, family, and service providers.

The sign language user connects to a VRS operator using Internet-based videoconferencing. The operator then places a voice call to the other party and relays the conversation from sign language to voice and vice-versa.

The service is available 24/7, 365 days a year and works over telephone, smart phone, tablet, and desktop computer. 

Find out more about SRV Canada video relay service