Access to the abandoned Clinton Creek Mine site is prohibited.

The site is currently unstable and dangerous. There is a risk of serious injury or death. 

Find out how the government manages Type II abandoned mines sites

  • Who is responsible for cleaning up the Type II mine sites?
  • What happens to Type II mine sites? How are these closed?
  • Status of Yukon's Type II mine sites
  • Monitoring water to keep the environment and people safe

There are 7 Type II mines in Yukon. These have or may have unfunded environmental liabilities. Some are abandoned and others are operating.

  1. Who is responsible for cleaning up the Type II mine sites?

    The governments of Canada, Yukon and Yukon First Nations work together to manage these sites. This relationship is outlined in the Devolution Transfer Agreement.

    As the Government of Canada originally approved these mines, the government is responsible for funding:

    • care and maintenance operations;
    • remediation planning;
    • site remediation; and
    • site closure.

      
    At some of the Type II sites, the Government of Yukon is responsible for carrying out:

    • care and maintenance operations;
    • remediation planning;
    • site remediation; and
    • site closure.

      
    The Government of Yukon consults and involves Yukon First Nations:

    • to develop remediation plans; and
    • on care and maintenance activities.

     

  2. What happens to Type II mine sites? How are these closed?

    Each abandoned Type II mine site has activities unique to its stage in the closure and remediation process.

    Before closure and remediation

    While waiting for closure and remediation, care and maintenance activities are carried out to:

    • maintain the site; and
    • protect people and the environment.

    Closing a mine

    Closing a mine site can range from:

    • dismantling infrastructure; to
    • remediation of disturbed areas.

    Remediation planning

    Before remediating a site, a remediation plan:

    • is developed;
    • goes through an environmental assessment; and
    • needs regulatory approvals.
  3. Status of Yukon's Type II mine sites

    Brewery Creek

    Still in operation. Owned by Golden Predator

    Clinton Creek

    Abandoned in 1978. The Government of Yukon is responsible for care-and-maintenance. Remediation planning is underway.

    Faro

    Abandoned in 1998. The Government of Canada is responsible for care-and-maintenance, and remediation. Remediation planning is underway.

    Ketza River

    Abandoned in 2015. The Government of Yukon is responsible for care-and-maintenance. Remediation planning is underway.

    Minto

    Under temporary care-and-maintenance since October 2018. Owned by Capstone Mining Corp.

    Mount Nansen

    Abandoned in 1999. The Government of Yukon is responsible for care-and-maintenance. Remediation planning underway. The Government of Canada is in the process of selling the mine site.

    United Keno Hill

    Abandoned in 2000. Operations restarted in 2006. Elsa Reclamation and Development Company Ltd. and Alexco Resource Corporation are responsible for care-and-maintenance, and remediation.

  4. Monitoring water to keep the environment and people safe

    Managing water on these sites is the most important way to keep people and the environment safe. We do this by keeping water from local creeks clean as it moves around and through these sites.

    The Government of Yukon leads care and maintenance activities at these Type II sites:

    • Clinton Creek;
    • Ketza; and
    • Mount Nansen.

    We collect contaminated water and treat it. We use the effluent quality standard in the mine's former water licence. Once it's met the standard, we discharge it back into the environment.

    Water monitoring data

    The Government of Canada is responsible for care and maintenance activities at the abandoned Faro mine site. You can find water monitoring data for the Faro mine site on the Yukon Water Board's Waterline.