Find out about victims' rights

  • Yukon Victims' Bill of Rights
  • Canadian Victims Bill of Rights

Victims rights are protected under the Yukon's Victims of Crime Act and under the Canadian Victims Bill of Rights.

  1. Yukon Victims' Bill of Rights

    Federal organizations such as the crown or RCMP are not bound by this act. Victim Services works to have victims’ rights respected throughout the criminal justice system.

    Who is a victim under the Yukon Victims of Crime Act

    A victim of crime is someone who suffered harm as the result of an offence. The act identifies 5 kinds of harm:

    • bodily injury;
    • mental injury;
    • emotional pain;
    • economic loss; and
    • loss of property.
       

    You can be a victim under the Yukon Victims of Crime Act even if:

    • no charge was laid; or
    • the accused was not convicted.

    Other victims

    A victim who has been harmed by the offence could be a:

    • family member; or
    • guardian.

    A person might suffer harm because of an offence against someone else. For example, a person who sees a close relative assaulted might suffer emotional pain.

    If the victim is a young child

    A guardian or caregiver can receive information and services for a child.

    What if the victim is not able to exercise their rights?

    Any of the following individuals may act for a victim under this act:

    • the victim’s spouse;
    • the person living with the victim in a conjugal relationship for at least 1 year;
    • a relative or dependent of the victim;
    • a person responsible for the care or support of the victim, or a dependent of the victim.

    What are your rights?

    The Yukon Victims of Crime Act states that victims of crime have the right to:

    • get information about the justice system;
    • express their views;
    • have their property returned when it's no longer needed as evidence; and
    • have their needs considered when victim programs and services are developed.

    The Victims of Crime Act also includes 3 basic rights. The right to:

    • be treated with courtesy, caring and respect;
    • privacy;
    • expect that reasonable measures consistent with the law will be taken to:
      • minimize their inconvenience; and
      • protect them from intimidation and retaliation. 
         

    The Act recognizes that protecting the dignity and safety of a person serves the well-being of the whole community.

    Learn more about the Yukon Victims of Crime Act.

  2. Canadian Victims Bill of Rights

    The rights of a victim of crime need to be considered during every stage of the criminal justice process by:

    • police;
    • prosecutors;
    • courts;
    • review boards;
    • corrections; and
    • parole boards.

    Who is a victim under the Canadian Victims Bill of Rights?

    A victim of crime is someone who has suffered harm as the result of an offence. The law identifies 4 kinds of harm:

    • physical harm;
    • emotional harm;
    • property damage; and
    • economic loss.

    If the victim is a young child

    A guardian can receive information and services for young children.

    What if the victim is not able to exercise their rights?

    Any of the following individuals may act for a victim under this act:

    • the victim’s spouse;
    • the person living with the victim in a conjugal relationship for at least 1 year;
    • a relative or dependent of the victim;
    • a person responsible for the care or support of the victim, or a dependent of the victim.

    Exercising your rights

    A victim of crime is able to exercise their rights while:

    • an offence is being investigated or prosecuted; and
    • the offender is going through the corrections or conditional release process.

    What are your rights?

    The bill gives a victim the right to information about:

    • the justice system;
    • Victim Services;
    • the progress of their case; and
    • the status of the person who harmed them.

    The bill gives a victim the right to participation:

    • Present a victim impact statement.
    • Give views on decisions that affect their rights.

    The bill gives a victim the right to seek restitution

    Restitution orders:

    • must be considered; and
    • can be enforced through civil courts.

    The bill gives a victim the right to protection

    • Security and privacy.
    • Reasonable and necessary protection from intimidation and retaliation.

    Read more about the Canadian Victim Bill of Rights.


Contact 

Victim Services

You can call or drop in to talk to us (no appointment required) Monday through Friday between 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Email: victim.services@gov.yk.ca

Whitehorse

In person: 301 Jarvis Street, 2nd floor
Phone: 867-667-8500, or toll free 1-800-661-0408, ext. 8500

Dawson City

In person: 813B 3rd Avenue
Phone: 867-993-5831

Watson Lake

In person: 820 Adela Trail
Phone: 867-536-2541